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Thread: Sugru Drip Lip

  1. #1
    Senior Member SouthernExposure's Avatar
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    Sugru Drip Lip

    I got into hammock hanging for several reasons. One of them was the dynamic and creative DIY spirit that pulses through this community. To date, I have made every piece of hammock equipment that I own.

    One area that many hangers seem to have some trouble with is rain water running down the tree, onto the suspension system and flowing right down into the hammock. There have been a number of solutions, some much more successful than others at diverting the flow off of the suspension before it can reach the hammock and soak it. The general solution has been to larkshead a shoestring or a strip of terry cloth onto the suspension. This has the effect of slowing the flow and providing a path for the water to drip off. Others have tried using carabiners, Dutch hardware or rings for the same ultimate goal. There is a very informative video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0-uOekjcU0) that shows tests conducted on many of these setups. He states that the string dripline solution works 100% of the time. While the string works, there may be times, such as was shown with the mechanical breaks, where rotation of the setup allowed the water to run right past it.

    The idea that rotation of the drip break device could present a problem got me to thinking and I came up with an idea. What about a conical dam on the line that redirects all pf the water away from the line and hammock and works equally well regardless of the rotation? After a number of unsuccessful attempts to make one I came up with a solution. It is based on a new material called Sugru. This is a moldable material that comes in a variety of colors that adheres very well to almost everything and cures to a flexible, rubbery state in around 24 hours. Just as with any other design, there are limitations. This has been designed for application on Whoopie Slings and other cord suspension systems. One could conceivably adapt this design for application onto strap suspensions.

    Here are the steps for making your own Drip Lip water break.

    Step 1:

    Gather the following items: 3 packets of Sugru in your favorite color, Saran wrap, popsicle sticks, Xacto knife and a rolling pin
    Open the Sugru and massage it well. I found that it took 3 packages to make 2 Drip Lips. Sugru has a work time of about 1 hour, so plan your time accordingly so that you can finish within that time frame. (Note: Once opened, the Sugru must be used immediately as the curing process has begun).

    IMG_2441.jpg


    Step 2:

    Place a piece of Saran wrap on your work surface, flatten out the Sugru and place it about 1/4 of the way from one of the short sides of the wrap, place the popsicle sticks on either side of the Sugru and fold the wrap over onto itself.

    IMG_2442.jpg


    Step 3:

    Take the rolling pin and flatten the Sugru to a uniform thickness of the two popsicle sticks.

    IMG_2443.jpg

    Step 4:

    Cut out a flat cone shape using the Xacto knife. For this sake of uniformity, I made a template of a circle with a 1.75" O.D and .25" I.D. with a wedge cut out.

    IMG_2444.jpg IMG_2445.jpg


    Step 5:

    Cut a rectangle out of the flat Sugru that is approximately .35" x 1". Wrap this around your Whoopie sling approximate half of the distance between the fixed eye loop near the hammock and the adjustable tail. Mold this onto the line into a cylinder of approximately .25" O.D. Taper the end of this cylinder that points away from the hammock. This will help the water to come off of the Whoopie sling easily. Place the cone shape at the midpoint of the cylinder and gently bring the straight edges together and mold them to form a cone with the opening facing away from the fixed eye end. Mold the cone and cylinder together where they meet.

    IMG_2448.jpg


    Step 6:

    Take a minute and gently form the cone into a clean symmetrical shape. The Drip Lip does not need to be made perfectly to work perfectly. Once the shape pleases your sensibilities, hang it up and let it cure for 24 hours. The finished piece is small, light, flexible and completely effective.

    IMG_2449.jpg


    Conclusion:

    The Drip Lip is effective for several reasons. It is made from a moldable silicone material which water does not adhere well to. It makes solid contact with the Whoopie sling and prevents water from passing under it. The conical shape makes the water reverse flow direction and flow away from the hammock. The lip of the cone lets water drip off clear of the line and prevents it from redirecting back to the line. Like a squirrel on a telephone wire, it simply cannot get past this obstacle.

    Have fun.

    Southern Exposure

  2. #2
    RBTR- Customer Support hk2001's Avatar
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    Genius! I have some Sugru left.. I need to find it!

  3. #3
    V_Allen's Avatar
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    What a brilliant post. I actually had to look up this "Sugru" to see what it was. Looks like a very versatile product with many uses.

  4. #4
    richtorfla's Avatar
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    Cool idea! Definitely will keep water running down the line from the hammock! Looks like its available at Target (local source). I see a lot more uses with this product coming!

  5. #5
    MAD777's Avatar
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    Wow, that looks effective and looks cool too!
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  6. #6
    Snowball's Avatar
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    This is very cool!
    Apparently we have some weird unspoken communication in this forum

    Until 3 days ago I did not know this stuff existed and yesterday I got almost the same idea. I was out shopping yesterday and looked for it but the store did not stock it so no cigar.
    When I got home I looked around and apparently it’s not new some members have used it for cooking gear and handles on tracking poles what not.
    If you look on YouTube you will find recipes for DIY “Sugru” using silicone and other stuff. Even though it doesn’t work as well for gluing stuff I think it would work for a drip lip. If it sticks to the cord your are fine (I think).

    Something to remember is:
    You can’t move it so select the location carefully.
    Water sticks to surfaces until the droplets gets too heavy and then they let go but the shape does make a difference. If it’s nice and round water will stick to it but if it’s a “sharp ege” it cannot. Conclusion, you will benefit from a relative sharp edge.
    Our suspension is not horizontal but around 30į

    The benefit of this is it weighs next to nothing and it can’t cut fabric or lines and I assume it’s very fixable so it won’t get damaged easily.
    This was my idea but I think both work.
    drip lip.png
    If there is nothing left to learn itís time to die.
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  7. #7
    Snowball's Avatar
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    After watching some videos made by SGT Rock I am considering to change my suspension systems.
    It involves Continuous loops so it gets a bit tricky so the drip lip don’t get in the way.
    Take your Continuous loop and stitch it together. This stitch I only to reduce stress on the Sugru so it does not split in two.

    Continuous loop drip lip.png
    If there is nothing left to learn itís time to die.
    Live and learn.

  8. #8
    Member jwygralak67's Avatar
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    I was pondering similar ideas but I never got as far as figuring out what to make it out of.
    This looks like a great idea.
    Have you tested one under the kitchen faucet yet?

  9. #9
    Senior Member SouthernExposure's Avatar
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    Yes I did. With the amsteel at 30 degrees to simulate the hang angle, I could not get water to go past the DripLip. No matter how much volume ran down the whoopie sling (it only holds so much), once it got to the DripLip, it simply came off and went into the sink.

    Cheers

    SE

  10. #10
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    Couple of quick points here:

    1) I think Sugru is neat, but sometimes it comes already cured/hardened in the package, and if I remember right it is relatively expensive. A Sugru substitute can be cheaply made with silicone caulking and cornstarch. Something like this.

    2) For this particular application, I had a similar thought... but instead of creating my own cone, I was going to purchase some small silicone funnels (like these) and simply slide them onto the suspension. Depending on how large the funnel neck is, I might have to stuff it with some Sugru substitute to ensure a tight seal. Alternatively, I had the thought that some earbud tips (like any of these) should work as well, though they might possibly be a little small. I was planning on trying with some of the spare tips supplied with my old earbuds.

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