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  1. #1
    cmseeley's Avatar
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    Underquilt stored in the pack... OK, or No?

    Hey all, I have upgraded my bottom insulation. I just got an HG 20 Under quilt and I am kind of excited to give it a try.

    I am one to leave my pack right in the van for a month on the off chance that an opportunity comes up to "get lost". This way I can essentially just take off right after work and my gear is ready to go.

    Is it ok for the down to be in the stuff sack that long, or should I not do that?

    Thanks for your input.

    Chris

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    Last edited by cmseeley; 10-29-2016 at 16:28.
    Chris (Chipper)

    It seems like a good time to get lost in the woods for a few days! --www.chipperoutdoors.com-- or ---facebook---

  2. #2
    Afterparty's Avatar
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    I wouldn't do that better to keep it in maybe a pillow case size bag when storing.
    In the shadows

  3. #3
    kitsapcowboy's Avatar
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    Get a cheap, durable, large-capacity dry bag from Wal-Mart, drop a packet of desiccant in the bottom, and keep your underquilt stored in your van bone-dry with minimal compression, ready for your next unplanned adventure.

    I ran into this same problem with a sleep system for my emergency bug-out bag; I keep a small, synthetic sleeping bag with "just enough" of a temperature rating (i.e., no margin) rolled but mostly uncompressed inside the backpack and store it there indefinitely in case of emergencies; it takes up more room in my pack than I'd like, but at least the bag remains "grab and go". In an emergency I can cinch down the sleeping bag's sack straps to compress it for more pack space if needed, and I can use the additional small, rolled SOL emergency bivy I keep as a backup to supplement the rating of the sleeping bag if things get super-cold... (I wish I could figure out a way to move to a bug-out hammock sleep system, but I still haven't worked that out yet within my required parameters...)

  4. #4
    TrailSlug's Avatar
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    Didn't the top quilt come with a cotton storage bag for uncompressed storage?

  5. #5
    ONE-CLICK markr6's Avatar
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    A month, 3 weeks, 11 days, a year. I don't know if there's ever going to be a definitive answer as to how long it's "OK". Maybe there's a test out there somewhere someone did on down? Personally, I just play it safe and take it to the extreme, not packing until the night or even hours before a trip (i.e. pack at 9pm, then leave 5am the next day).

  6. #6
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmseeley View Post
    Is it ok for the down to be in the stuff sack that long, or should I not do that?
    You should not do that. The HG website even tells you not to do it:

    We have stressed that goose down should not be compressed for long periods of time. Specifically, your quilt should not be kept in a stuffsack or compression sack and put away until next season. A pillowcase, a trash bag, a large plastic bin,or hanging it up is ideal.

    http://www.hammockgear.com/frequently-asked/

    So does the Underground Quilts website:

    Never store your quilts in its itty-bitty stuff sack! The longer you compress the insulation, the more loft it loses. It's fine to use a stuff sack-even a compression stuff sack-on the trail, but the minute you get home, get your quilts out of that confined space, give them a good shake to fluff up the fill material, then store it in a cool, dry place. Spread it out under your bed, hang it in a closet, or put it in a big, breathable storage bag. If you don't have such a sack, use a king-size pillowcase.


    http://undergroundquilts.com/use/default.html
    Last edited by SilvrSurfr; 10-29-2016 at 19:54.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

  7. #7
    cmseeley's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips all. It did come with a storage bag. I was just curious if there was any kind of suggested maximum time frame that it is ok to leave it in the stuff sack.

    I guess I will just figure on something else for the spontaneous trips and keep it out of the pack when not going for a few days for sure.



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
    Chris (Chipper)

    It seems like a good time to get lost in the woods for a few days! --www.chipperoutdoors.com-- or ---facebook---

  8. #8
    Carrico's Avatar
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    I have found conflicting information about this on the internet, apparently the problem is compression causes the micro fibers that make up your insulation whether it's down or synthetic to break down over time, as the fibers break you get less Loft hence less insulation value. the conflicting information that bothers me is, are the fibers damage from the actual compression or being stored compress for long periods of time? it seems that this affects synthetic insulation more than down because the synthetic fibers break down faster than down. I have a under quilt top quilt combination that I have comfortably taking down to 32 degrees on multiple instances.however one time I left my insulation compressed for over a week, I had missed a hiking trip and knew I would have a chance for another one the following weekend so I just left it compressed.I noticed a huge difference in warm basically I froze my butt off at 45 degrees with a light Breeze I'm pretty sure this is because I left it compressed for a week. It seems to me the longer you leave it compressed the longer it takes to loft backup. Then I've heard from people who have gotten the vacuum sealed military down bags that they use for emergencys and such and they swear they're still in perfect condition even after being compressed for 30 plus years.
    By all means, let's argue about whether or not a hammock will hurt a tree. All the while ignoring the fact that there is an island of garbage the size of Texas floating in the Pacific ocean. Or how about the fact that over 75% of the world's nuclear reactors are leaking...

  9. #9

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    I would probably relate it to a spring. The more frequently (and intense) a spring is compressed (think car suspension system), the sooner the spring will lose its strength.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I definitely store my down gear uncompressed, but I find it odd that big gear manufacturers tend to pack their sleeping bags as small as possible and send them to outlets like REI and the like to sit in a store room for as long as it takes to sell them. Perhaps that's why a 20* big Agnes bag isn't as warm as a 20* LLG or HG quilt, or whatever... it comes damaged. But it also seems like there would be more effort on the part of the manufacturers to ship gear less compressed to maintain the integrity of the gear and their good name, if it was a huge giant deal. And for a thru hike, is a bag only good for one? After 6 months of being stuffed in the bottom of a pack is it losing such loft that it's nearly useless?

    Cheers,
    the Goat
    Cheers,
    The Goat

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