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  1. #1
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    Newishbe questions on TQ temp ratings for upcoming trip

    Anyone have any advice on staying comfortable in the hammock when you know temperatures might dip into the 30s but it's mostly been in the 60s?

    TLDR; need advice on upcoming trip to High sierras - elevation ~9000' for six nights. Have 20 UQ - but don't know if I should use 20 TQ or a combo of fleece and 50 TQ for expected temps in the 40s?

    I am going back out to Yosemite High sierras later this month for a 6 day loop and where I expected temperatures to potentially drop to the mid 30s but based on the current forecasting will be in the 50s.

    I have only about 10 nights under my belt in hammock camping but years of sleeping on the ground. On the ground I can be comfortable using a 20 quilt even when it's 50-60 at night by only have it partly cover me. In the hammock though through my recent own experience, I can't comfortablebly do the same thing of using my 20 bag in the 50-60s. When I do, it either I am sweating bullets or getting to cold when remove it completely, I can't 'kick' the TQ aside enough because of the way the hammock funnels it back on to me to stay cool enough.

    So I want to be prepared for the potential 30 nights but expect the temps to be in the high 40s at night on the is near trip.

    I have in my arsenal of TQs a 0, 20 and 50 degree bags. My zero and 20 are EE down bags and the 50 is a EE apex material bag.

    I thought about bringing my 50 degree bag and a fleece blanket where I thought I might could use the fleece down to the 50-60s temps and then if/when it gets colder, layer over the 50 bag to hopefully be comfortable down to 40?? I never done that so I have no idea if that would work down to that temperature. I have about a 100 miles planned in 6 days so I'm am trying to keep the weight and bulk down of my setup or otherwise I might just bring both the 20 degree TQ and a fleece..

    Any thoughts? Thanks

    At this moment I am thinking Ill use the 20 down TQ and try to make it work.

  2. #2
    TrailSlug's Avatar
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    Top quilts are very easy to vent so I would say bring the 20 degree and be comfortable. That would probably be the same weight as the 50 and an additional layer as well.

  3. #3

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    I would absolutely bring the 20. I have used a 20* TQ at 70* overnight without a UQ and been very comfortable. If you find yourself getting too warm you can always vent your UQ a bit, loosening the suspension or opening up the end cinches, or a combination of both. That will sort out some of the overrating "issues" you may be faced with. I may be an odd duck, here, but I find that if my underside is cool, I can use nearly whatever TQ in warm temperatures and be comfortable. It seems to even out for me. I, too, also don't have much problem venting a tq but know exactly what you mean about the hammock funneling it all back on top of you. Is your TQ a sewn footbox or cinch end? If cinch you can open it up a bit also if it's too warm. Personally, I would rather carry a few extra ounces and maybe sleep a little bit warm than not have enough insulation. I've been there and hypothermia sucks. It's much easier to vent over warm quilts than it is to wish a too cool set to keep you warm.
    Cheers,
    The Goat

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Goat View Post
    I would absolutely bring the 20. I have used a 20* TQ at 70* overnight without a UQ and been very comfortable. If you find yourself getting too warm you can always vent your UQ a bit, loosening the suspension or opening up the end cinches, or a combination of both. That will sort out some of the overrating "issues" you may be faced with. I may be an odd duck, here, but I find that if my underside is cool, I can use nearly whatever TQ in warm temperatures and be comfortable. It seems to even out for me. I, too, also don't have much problem venting a tq but know exactly what you mean about the hammock funneling it all back on top of you. Is your TQ a sewn footbox or cinch end? If cinch you can open it up a bit also if it's too warm. Personally, I would rather carry a few extra ounces and maybe sleep a little bit warm than not have enough insulation. I've been there and hypothermia sucks. It's much easier to vent over warm quilts than it is to wish a too cool set to keep you warm.
    Oh, very good point about not using the UQ if it is to hot. All my top quilts are the EE Rev where the foot box is not sewn in.
    I just bought a 20 UQ that I have not used yet - its the Warbonnet Yeti 20. I am having a tougher time in practice getting it to settle under me and the elastic suspension for it is so tight that it is effecting the way I lay in that hammock. I am using a 10' Dutch single layer. Anyways thanks for the input.

  5. #5
    blgoode's Avatar
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    I would be worried about the under quilt needs. In my opinion you better be covered benieth you or the top quilt won't matter at all what it is.

  6. #6
    New Member Getintouch98's Avatar
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    I have actually found that if my UQ is right the TQ doesn't matter much. What I mean is when it's cold if I feel warm on the bottom the TQ doesn't have to be rated as low. Same as when it is hot. If I have no UQ I can use a lower rating TQ and not sweat.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Member
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    In general I find that I prefer a lower rated UQ than that for a TQ. For me, a TQ just works without any real adjustment other than opening it or pushing it aside if I'm getting too warm, i.e., it's hard to screw up configuring a TQ.

    A UQ on the other hand, can be too snug and will compress or more likely too loose and allow drafts. I find I have to adjust an UQ way more than a TQ so I prefer to have for example a 30 UQ and a 40 TQ and expect them to both behave like a 40.

    Also, the sides of the hammock block the wind and form a pocket to trap the air while underneath it's all open and easy for the slightest breeze to replace the air below with fresh cold air.

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