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Thread: Wind Protection

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by W8lkinUSA View Post
    Sounds like you're looking for the smallest tarp possible with good wind protection. I'm following this thread since I'm also looking for the same thing.

    I've been contemplating Warbonnet's three newer fly tarps due to less stakes and less cord required. I'd also like to use it for camping as rain shelter over picnic tables. The SuperFly is still my primary tarp.
    I really like the minifly. Its roughly the same dimensions as my current tarp on the sides, so I'd really be heavily relying on the uqp for good wind cover. I think if I were to choose one of warbonnet fly options, itd be the mountainfly or thunderfly to get the extra width on the sides.

    Without true tarp doors though, you'd also be susceptible to wind changes. The extra rain protection is very cool though.

  2. #12
    kitsapcowboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dlrocm View Post
    More than likely, this is what I'll end up doing. The gram weenie in me is trying to find alternatives ?
    Ultimately, only three factors are going to matter if you want to combat wind and blown/indirect precipitation; in ranked order, (IMHO) they are:

    1) Pitch
    2) Panel Width
    3) Door type and configuration

    Pitch is up to you.

    The wider panel width you can live with, the more protection and the more options you will have against wind and rain, and most two-panel tarp options you choose are going to provide better defense than the WL Tadpole.

    If your priority is sealing out drafts, especially during typically changeable winter conditions where the wind can shift, full doors are really your best option, but with maximum panel width and full doors plus the extra hardware, you'll need to pack, limiting the ridge line length and choosing a lightweight material are only options you have left to shave a few grams. (Doors that fold flat on the ends instead of providing a triangular vestibule like a true winter tarp will be a minor accommodation toward lighter weight.)

    Conversely, if you want decent extreme weather protection while still prioritizing light weight and a small pack size with less hassle, consider a full-width hex tarp with half doors, like the Warbonnet Mountainfly or my own DIY Badlander. You get a compact ridge line, maximum panel width from standard waterproof fabric, and convenient and lightweight half doors yo protect the ends and cut the breeze while requiring only a micro-biner for door management (no extra stakes or guy lines required).



    (My DIY tarp came in at 14 ounces in 1.1 oz silpoly.)
    Last edited by kitsapcowboy; 07-11-2018 at 08:48.
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  3. #13
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    Wind Protection

    That badlander tarp seems like a happy compromise.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by OneClick View Post
    The Superfly is a classic. Nearly a do-it-all tarp. I also have the Mamajamba but recently decided I need just a little extra on the ends, so I picked up a Thunderfly as well. All three may seem excessive on paper, but in real use it's the perfect arsenal to have depending on the weather and location.

    I have to agree with SS on blocking the wind. It just makes more sense to block the wind with a proper tarp before it even becomes a problem rather than try to supplement with a UQP. I'm not saying a UQP is useless; it does have other benefits. But it's just not something I ever felt a need for.
    I'm still undecided between the Thunderfly and the Minifly. With the Superfly already in my arsenal, I'm not terribly concerned with wind protection for colder months.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dlrocm View Post
    I really like the minifly. Its roughly the same dimensions as my current tarp on the sides, so I'd really be heavily relying on the uqp for good wind cover. I think if I were to choose one of warbonnet fly options, itd be the mountainfly or thunderfly to get the extra width on the sides.

    Without true tarp doors though, you'd also be susceptible to wind changes. The extra rain protection is very cool though.
    Sounds like you could use a backup tarp with greater coverage. I'm considering options to increase air flow during warmer months. It isn't necessary, so I may not even get it, but I'm still considering it.

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