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  1. #21
    Senior Member Buffalo Skipper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    One thing to remember is:
    Repeated eating before bed, over time/years
    will develop into an acid reflux issue. . . .

    and that could in turn develop into bronchial pneumonia if not realized.

    Check it out for sure . . .
    I sometimes have heart burn issues (it's not acid reflux, and I am not in denial), especially when camping. What I have discovered about me is that 3 things contribute to this. 1) the time I eat, relative to going to bed. If I have a very late dinner or late snack, this can be a problem. 2) the quantity I eat. If I have a large meal I am more susceptible to heart burn as I sleep. 3) The biggest star of this, however is what I eat. Heavy, rich foods are the death of me. I love my mom's homemade pies (especially cherry!). For the longest time, I thought it was the acid in the cherries, but have more recently concluded that it is the Crisco she uses in the crust. Heavy foods like this, especially in if I have an extra piece, late, can only be the death of me.

    My worst camping/heartburn experience was 4 years ago when someone made "walking tacos." That is a heavy taco meat with appropriate seasonings (not hot, btw) served in a bag of Fritos with cheese and sour cream. I slept in my sleeping bag while sitting up, leaned slightly forward (somehow I had forgotten my antacid and a/c!). Aside from one near hypothermic experience, it was the most miserable night camping I have ever experenced.

    My point is that now, this never happens to me, because I am careful about what I have to eat/drink before bed. I generally only drink water (all day every day, after my requisite 2 cups of morning coffee). No more sodas or tea, which I used to down all day long. I also limit my rich sweets late.

    I want to hear more here, as it is informative to see how eating and drinking relate to warmth.
    “Indian builds small fire and stays warm, white man builds big fire and stays warm collecting firewood”—unknown

    “The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea”—Karen Blixen

  2. #22
    canoebie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lori View Post
    Some of us are lucky and get to do 2-6 nights backpacking per month. A lot of folks go a lot less than that. Sounds fairly moderate to me.
    LOL, I don't mean moderation in terms of time outdoors, extreme is not an issue when it comes to that.

    I do see people become extreme when they eat and drink while they are out of doors. For most here, we do a good job of keeping healthy especially when backpacking. I have seen canoeists get crazy with food and alcohol, becoming seriously dehydrated and ill. Crazy folks in a boat.

    When it comes to time outdoors, I am an extremist!!!
    “Things are as they are. Looking out into the universe at night, we make no comparisons between right and wrong stars, nor between well and badly arranged constellations.”
    ― Alan W. Watts


    http://www.riverjourneys.org

  3. #23
    CrankyOldGuy's Avatar
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    I just spent 3 nights at the Flat Laurel Creek area in western NC. The forecast was for a low of 40 deg. (Asheville Airport) but judging by the frost, it was a good bit colder. In my HH with UC, pad, space blanket and 32 deg bag, 2 pairs of poly long underwear, a knit cap and a down "sweater" left me feeling clammy which made the cold seem worse.

    On night 3 (the coldest night), I dropped one layer of long underwear. I woke up shivering heavily. That warmed me up nicely(!) and I managed to go back to sleep (with my head in the bag).

    I'm saving my pennies for a proper down UQ and TQ.
    "A bore is a man who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company." Gian Vincenzo Gravina (1664 - 1718)

  4. #24
    Senior Member earplug94's Avatar
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    I know this is going to sound a bit strange. Well, then again the time we spend consumed with hammocking is kinda strange in itself.
    I take a large trash bag. Cut out arm holes and a hole for your head. I put this on over a lightweight capilene shirt and place a heavier weight capilene shirt over the trash bag. That way you don't look like you are wearing a trashbag - lol. It must add around 10 -15 degrees of warmth for ME. Sometimes- it makes me roast abit. It's simply a do it yourself vapor barrier liner. I also use Kroger bags under my socks on my feet at night. Really helps alot. I have the more expensive Sealskinz - dealios. But, I prefer the bags for some reason or another. Everyone is different and your mileage may vary.

    earplug
    We will never conquer a mountain. The mountain allows us to visit and with enough time asks us to kindly go back down. And sits in peace with or without our presence.
    my quote.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Mountain Gout's Avatar
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    It's really nice to read all this input.. Funny how different we all are.. I agree with the less is more as far as clothing at night, but that was during my ground dwelling days..
    Shugman also made me realize I was neglecting the hand wrist area, which does make a difference, at this point in my journey, with a wally pad and sleeping bag, and a fleece or wool blanket, I can stay fairly warm to mid 30s. Condensation is my immediate enemy But by next year I will have the tq-uq combo and predict
    immense bliss and pleasure...Oh, the price to pay for happieness..
    Last edited by Mountain Gout; 10-15-2010 at 11:59.
    We would be one step closer to world peace, if everyone slept in a hammock..

  6. #26
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    I know this thread has been quiet for a while, but the information still is pertinent (will add the lite high calorie/fat snack and water to my mix of tricks).

    My brother an I are planning on making a trek up to Mt. Mitchell in Feb. With lows possibly getting down to the upper teens..... :| Now it looks as though there will be a significant amount of snowfall to boot during this time. Just wondering if anyone had pile snow up against their tarp as an extra layer of insulation? I know the basic ice cave concept is that ice is only 32* which is easier to survive than colder temperatures. If you have done this... any suggestions? Thanks

  7. #27
    Senior Member Boston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken_c View Post
    I know this thread has been quiet for a while, but the information still is pertinent (will add the lite high calorie/fat snack and water to my mix of tricks).

    My brother an I are planning on making a trek up to Mt. Mitchell in Feb. With lows possibly getting down to the upper teens..... :| Now it looks as though there will be a significant amount of snowfall to boot during this time. Just wondering if anyone had pile snow up against their tarp as an extra layer of insulation? I know the basic ice cave concept is that ice is only 32* which is easier to survive than colder temperatures. If you have done this... any suggestions? Thanks
    People have done this, or at least similar. In my area generally the snow isn't deep enough, so this is 2nd hand knowledge.

    Basically I've seen people dig out the area under the tarp, and use the snow pile to block off the gap between the tarp and the ground. Hanging the tarp a little lower helps with this. The idea here isn't adding insulation, but preventing forced convection from the flowing wind. forced convection (air being moved over a surface by an outside force) vs natural convection (air's tendency to rise and fall due to a heating/cooling cycle) are orders of magnitude different, so by blocking the wind, the convective heat loss will be much smaller.

    Having doors on your tarp will help with this as well.

  8. #28
    New Member
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    Between that, UQ, TQ and hot water bottle... I hope to have a warm hang. I love the snow covered landscapes, pry cause we don't get them here too often.

    Thanks

  9. #29
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken_c View Post
    Between that, UQ, TQ and hot water bottle... I hope to have a warm hang. I love the snow covered landscapes, pry cause we don't get them here too often.

    Thanks
    Make sure to be warm when you crawl in the hammock. Hot drink (cocoa), camp chores, fast walking, a few jumping jacks right before snooze.
    I pile snow around my tarp but keep it out enough that the accumulating snow does not pile and collapse my tarp.

    Shug



    Whooooo Buddy)))) All Secure in Sector Seven

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  10. #30
    DCBerry's Avatar
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    Plenty of fluids is a must and I always eat a Cliffs bar and it makes a noticeable difference and I make sure I have dry socks/clothes on. Winter time I will always wear my boot liners to bed they not only dry over night but I don't have that cold shock of putting my feet into cold boots in the morning. I also use a pee bottle so I don't need to get out of the hammock during those ice cold freezing nights. I find it extremely efficient and the heat in the bottle generates even more heat.

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