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Thread: Nixing the Net

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    Nixing the Net

    Maybe I'm crazy, or maybe I'm just drinking the koolaid, but I've had a few people swear to me that I can get by without bug protection by hanging replant on my ridgeline. Has anyone experimented with this idea? I've considered permertheren (sp?) on the bottom of my hammock, possibly soaking a bandana in it and hanging it from the ridgeline. Does anyone have any other ideas? Also, does permertheren (sp?) actually repel bugs, or does it just kill them once they encounter it? PS, I live in Kentucky with lots of creepy crawlies in the spring and summer.

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    New Member Ankylosed's Avatar
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    For me, while I'm a lightening rod for Mosquitos, the bug net also is a barrier for other things that can fall on you from up top from leaves to caterpillars. Maybe it's my tent roots but I like having some isolation from these things. I am in Tennessee and have used my hammocks many times in Kentucky and in the mornings I see what could have been spending to night with me and am grateful for my net.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanO20 View Post
    Maybe I'm crazy, or maybe I'm just drinking the koolaid, but I've had a few people swear to me that I can get by without bug protection by hanging replant on my ridgeline.
    I wouldn't listen to those people; they're crazy. My wife and one of my kids think DEET and permethrin are evil. Guess what? They've never been bit by a mosquito - ever. If you happen to be one of those people then by all means use the mosquito protection techniques employed by those people. I'm a mosquito magnet and I'd take advice from them on mosquito protection about as quick as I'd take advice from a vegetarian on how to cook a steak.

    Permethrin kills bugs, but I've also found it creates a no-fly zone.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    Two valid points from the two of you. I suppose I'll begin the search for a bug net of sorts. I have a nano 7, so weight savings is my priority (I'm a sad little ounce counter) and I was curious about the the HUG Bug do-dat. Any experience with these? I've seen a few references to them in other posts, but mainly just about their weight.

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    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    The HUG is a half bugnet that depends on other components of your setup (hammock and topquilt/sleeping bag) for bug protection. I don't find this idea particularly appealing because bug season is the one season I'm likely to kick my TQ off. Bye-bye bug protection. I also don't like spraying my hammock with permethrin.

    I use the BIAS NanoBuginator, which weighs seven ounces. You can DIY one - just look up Fronkey-style bugnet. I'm a big fan of bottom-entry bugnets. Dream Hammock also makes a bug sock, which could weigh 5.5 oz. or over 8 oz. depending on the size/length you specify. However, I'm not a big fan of socks since they do not afford quick exit (nor do I like zippered bugnets for the same reason).

    The vast majority of people seem to prefer hammocks with integrated bugnets or zippered bugnets so I'm in the minority. However, I do very little camping in the bug season and like to leave the bugnet at home. Even though I'm a mosquito magnet, I know when I'm hiking they're not going to bother me (unless I stop). And I know that below 60 degree temps mosquitoes become lethargic and at 50 degrees are not able to function. So I really don't need a bugnet that often. Where you camp may be different.

    One thing I will say: I spray all my clothes with permethrin - that probably keeps skeeters away quite a bit.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Since you're using a Nano 7, you could probably make a lighter bugnet (i.e., not as long). Whether bottom entry or sock, you wouldn't need as long a bugnet as I do using 11 ft. hammocks. In all likelihood you'll need a hammock ridgeline, however, to keep the bugnet off your face.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    Senior Member southmark's Avatar
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    I very seldom use my net (a HUG). My hammock and my clothes are treated with permethrin.

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    My first DIY hammock project was a fixed ridgeline made out of dynaglide (not sure of the diameter) at the recommended 83% length etc. So I've got the ridgeline taken care of, I ordered a UQ off of another member, I've got suspension (don't laugh, but my suspension weighs almost as much as my hammock right now) so I'm focused on tarp and bug netting now. Does the BIAS NanoBuginator pack small? I'm a former ground dweller and I carried my 26 oz. tent in my pad straps outside my 42L pack. This saved me a lot of room so I could do long and thru trips with minimal pack size. I need a compact option, hence the inquiry about the HUG.

  9. #9
    New Member NTA_Shawn's Avatar
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    Couldn't live w/o my net. I live in S MS (basically in between two swamps) and the skeeters laugh at most bug repellants here.

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    Left to right Nalgene, Buginator, NanoBuginator, Foster beer can.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

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