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  1. #1
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    One pole portable support? (for when there's only 1 tree to hang from)

    So after asking about good hang-able campsites in Wharton State Forest near me, there seems to be a shortage of two good trees at most campsites. The pictures usually show one tree I can work with. What kind of hammock support have people built when there's only one tree to hang from? All the topics seem to be about complete 2-pole setups and I don't know if ony building half of it will work.

    I'm looking for portable (I have a little Honda Civic to haul it with...usually filled with other camping stuff and two kayaks on the roof), and easily buildable (trying to rig something for a trip this Saturday). I have a full array of powertools, but can't weld or anything. Have two 25' lengths of 7/64" amsteel if that's needed. Am hoping the support doesn't include sledgehammering 4' lengths of rebar into the ground or whatnot. I have a WBBB XLC with 11' ridgeline, and I weigh 290 pounds. I guess it'll also need to support my WB Superfly as well. Any help is appreciated.


    On a related topic, for when there's two trees, but they're really far apart (and I literally wouldn't be able to reach high enough to position the tree straps for the correct angle), has anybody tried something like this: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...****-DIY-posts? I don't have any rings to use like they show in that post, but could run tree straps (I have 7' long ones), to some 7/64" amsteel, with two slippery hitches to attach the continuous loops of my hammock though (and hold those continuous loops in place with toggles)? --still new to all these knots and terms so please bare with me!

  2. #2
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    Simplest thing is probably a single 2x4 wood strut with two lines to secure it attached to it and secured with 3' lengths of rebar pounded into the ground.

    Angle at around 60 degrees from the ground away from you for the most strength.

  3. #3
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    I've been using some better search keywords and have found some setups like that. The best seem to be a bi-pod (two supports in an upside-down "V" shape so it won't rock back and forth like a single support can), anchored with rope from the top of the post, then to the ground (or to the base of a far-away tree). Where I camp the most it's all sand. I would literally need 3+ feet of rebar and a sledgehammer, and it being all sand I still don't think it'll work (nor do I own or want to buy a sledgehammer, and bring a shovel to dig out the rebar once I'm finished

    Any options (without using massive spikes in the ground) to do something like a half turtle-dog (tri-pod) stand? Do I always need a solid wood support running above and parallel to the ridgeline when only using half of the stand (like they use on the 2x tri-pod setup)? (that seems to be one of my biggest questions with a setup like that)

  4. #4
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    The turtledog stand uses a metal fence post rail hung parallel to the ground between the tops of the two tripods. That piece is an integral part of the system which directs the force of the hammock evenly down the legs of the tripod. It effectively handles and cancels out the shear force from your suspension which would otherwise be acting on the legs of the tripod (or your tree, or strut). Have you ever checked out the Ultimate Hang Hammock Calculator? It is a simple way to see some of the forces involved when you adjust the angle of your hang. Check it out and for kicks adjust the hang angle to 5 degrees to see the tremendous shear force a 200 pound person can cause against their suspension, trees and struts when they hang a tight hammock. Your lines and rebar are what is keeping that shear force from tipping over or snapping your struts or tripod. That magic 60 degree angle of a strut also helps redirect that shear force down the length of the strut rather than bending/breaking/tipping it over.

    You'd probably need an absolutely massive, low angled, and/or asymmetrical tripod in order to have any chance of hanging with no lines/stakes securing it in some fashion. I'm speaking from some experience as I've attempted to make what you're thinking about, and failed miserably. Stakes made all the difference in the world, and they needed to be BIG to offset that shear force.

    There are sand and snow stakes which eschew using the normal "skinny nail" shape. Sand hog is an example. A couple of those might be easier than dealing with long rebar.

  5. #5
    Senior Member goanywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dochartaigh View Post
    I've been using some better search keywords and have found some setups like that. The best seem to be a bi-pod (two supports in an upside-down "V" shape so it won't rock back and forth like a single support can), anchored with rope from the top of the post, then to the ground (or to the base of a far-away tree). Where I camp the most it's all sand. I would literally need 3+ feet of rebar and a sledgehammer, and it being all sand I still don't think it'll work (nor do I own or want to buy a sledgehammer, and bring a shovel to dig out the rebar once I'm finished

    Any options (without using massive spikes in the ground) to do something like a half turtle-dog (tri-pod) stand? Do I always need a solid wood support running above and parallel to the ridgeline when only using half of the stand (like they use on the 2x tri-pod setup)? (that seems to be one of my biggest questions with a setup like that)
    You can buy long wide sand pegs that will to the job. They can take over 100lb each in sand. Just make sure you hammer them in so that the top is just under the surface and they are on about a 50 deg angle. Use 2 on the one end and you are set (unless you're the michelin man). I hang like this with a hardwood 1" dowel pole. I can also hang using my kayak paddle as the pole.

  6. #6
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    I carry a bipod and a 50' ratchet strap. With that length, I can usually reach out and find something to anchor to. Like a Honda Civic.

    Be very careful with overly long pegs, bars, etc in campgrounds...remember, there are buried utilties there.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
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  7. #7
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    Btw, I just built a telescoping bipod for a friend with a small car. It's made of 14g square steel tubing. No welding...could be built with a hacksaw and a drill.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldgringo View Post
    I carry a bipod and a 50' ratchet strap. With that length, I can usually reach out and find something to anchor to. Like a Honda Civic.
    Good point. For this trip I will have my car there and it just so happens to have a nice tow mount on the rear I can connect the rope to! So something like two 2x4's, connected with a heavy duty fence hinge (or the good old boy scout method of lashing poles together), angled away from the hammock. Rope going from the top of the 2x4's, to the tow hitch mount point below my rear bumper (like pictured).

    Should I buy some larger (like 12" long) stakes to put in front of the two feet of the 2x4's so they can't slide?

    If I'm using two 2x4's, I kinda have a set height of where I'm hanging from, right? So I better pick a good height with the hang calculator (usually at my eye level, so around 5'10" might be good).

    Will the 2x4's hold my weight, and is 7/64" Amsteel fine to use from the 2x4's to my car?






    Quote Originally Posted by oldgringo View Post
    Btw, I just built a telescoping bipod for a friend with a small car. It's made of 14g square steel tubing. No welding...could be built with a hacksaw and a drill.
    Have more details/instructions?

  9. #9
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    2x4s will be fine. Instead of a hinge, I would use a large eyebolt. Make a limiter out of whatever cord you have handy to prevent the legs from spreading. I'll get pics of the bipod later today.

    Oh. Keep your keys in your pocket.
    Dave

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    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
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  10. #10

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    The Alamosa Stand and his Stake Boom system may be what you're looking for. Even if you use a crossed bi-pod, the Stake boom may help to anchor it.

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