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Arkwater
10-17-2006, 12:54
How do you incoprorate them into your homade hammocks & what type-rating line do you use?

Just Jeff
10-17-2006, 13:45
I just tie a loop in each end, then slide the support through the loop. I've used BPL's Air Core 2 (very thin and light, but pretty strong), Air Core Plus, 550 cord, crazy strong overkill ~7mm Spectra...maybe that's all.

The Air Core 2 is the lightest, but it's so thin I think it's damaging the Air Core Plus that I use for the hammock supports. Probably not worth the weight savings over just using Air Core Plus as a ridgeline.

But the main point is that pretty much anything will work as a ridgeline...breaking strength of 250+, maybe?

There's a force calculator in the Files section of the Yahoo group - you could enter your criteria and it'll estimate how much force your ridgeline takes. You might err on the high end when choosing a line, though - a snapped ridgeline could put out an eye.

Just Jeff
10-17-2006, 13:47
One more thing - the right ridgeline length will vary for user, and for each hammock you make if you change the dimensions. When I have a new hammock, I tie a loop in one end and slide it over the hammock support. Then I use the HH Figure-8 lashing to attach the ridgeline to the other support. When I get the length to where it's most comfortable to me, I mark it, tie the loop and slide it over just like the other end.

Miguel
10-17-2006, 14:05
Uh...at the risk of giving away my stealth newbie status (oops...too late), I must ask. Exactly what is a "ridge line", and do I need one?

Thanks, Miguel

Ewker
10-17-2006, 14:19
another reason for a basic beginner hammock thread

Arkwater
10-17-2006, 15:06
Uh...at the risk of giving away my stealth newbie status (oops...too late), I must ask. Exactly what is a "ridge line", and do I need one?

Thanks, Miguel

A rope or string that spans the length of the hammock, just above it. Good for hanging lights, boots, glasses, mosquito nets, or anything else you don't want on the ground. Some tie their tarps to them.

jlb2012
10-17-2006, 15:18
A rope or string that spans the length of the hammock, just above it. Good for hanging lights, boots, glasses, mosquito nets, or anything else you don't want on the ground. Some tie their tarps to them.

Main reason for the ridge line is to set the "right" amount of sag so as to make the hammock comfortable without much fiddling with the suppension ropes/straps

Arkwater
10-17-2006, 16:00
Main reason for the ridge line is to set the "right" amount of sag so as to make the hammock comfortable without much fiddling with the suppension ropes/straps

Oh yea! That too.:)

Miguel
10-17-2006, 16:45
I'm sorry but I'm still a bit confused. Is it built in or added on? Seems I've read that some hammocks have a "built in" ridgeline where others don't. Do Claytors jungle hammocks have a ridgeline? Neo?

Just Jeff
10-17-2006, 17:39
Two types of ridgelines.

First, the structural ridgeline is very tight, non-stretchy, and sets the amount of sag on the hammock. When you pull the hammock supports tight, you're also pulling the ridgeline tight...but since the ridgeline holds a fixed length, the fabric in the hammock body isn't affected. Tom Hennessy has a patent on this kind of ridgeline so other hammocks can't be sold with it, but you can make your own or add it on to another model with no issues. I like it b/c no matter how you hang your hammock, it always has the same amount of sag. Also, you can tie the supports to the tree at a lower level and still have a comfortable hammock b/c it increases the sag.

Next, non-structural ridgelines are just strung up support bugnets or tarps and don't change how the hammock sags. Some of these are elastic and some are cord, occasionally webbing on some homemade ones.

Both kinds are good for holding boots, jackets, stuff sacks with nighttime essentials, etc. I always hang my headlamp and emergency whistle up there...that way I can blow the whistle when a bear comes sniffing and never have to leave the hammock. Since I switched to a soft-sided Nalgene I use my water as a pillow, but before that I always had a stuff sack with a snack and bottle of water hung on the ridgeline.

Hammock ridgelines are also different from tarp ridgelines. Tarp ridgelines are sometimes just a sewn seam running along the center length that needs to be sealed, and some folks actually run a cord for the full length between the trees and the tarp lays on top of it. Each type has advantages...but as I said, don't confuse tarp ridgelines with hammock ridgelines.

Ewker, I'll work on the beginner hammock thread.

Ewker
10-17-2006, 18:20
Jeff, It will be much appreciated.

Miguel
10-17-2006, 20:39
Thanks for the description. Are there any good pictures floating around that clearly show a structural ridgeline? Also, wouldn't it be a good thing to be able to regulate the amount of sag as opposed to having it always the same?

Miguel

blackbishop351
10-17-2006, 20:47
I think the idea is that once your hammock is done stretching, you get the sag so it's most comfortable for you and then you want it to stay that way.

I haven't tried a non-structural ridgeline, but after experiencing the ridge on my HH being loose, I don't think that's how I want to go.

Just Jeff
10-17-2006, 21:40
Miguel - check my website for pics of the ridgeline. Any ridgeline you see on my hammock is structural. It makes a big difference b/c you'll see that the hammock supports are at an angle, and then the hammock body is at a much steeper angle...that's the extra sag introduced by the structural ridgeline.

I think this page (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeGearWarmHammock.html) has pics of the same hammock with and w/o the ridgeline, but there are many other pics in the Hiking Pictures section.

I agree w/ blackbishop - once you get the sag where you like it for that hammock, I think there's not much advantage in being able to adjust it. You may find some conditions where you like to adjust it, though - that's the beauty of homemade gear (or your own mods to commercial gear).

Plenty of folks use standard Speer hammocks w/o structural ridgelines, and they're still very comfortable. It's just a preference thing - I prefer them, others don't.

Miguel
10-18-2006, 08:53
Thanks for the picture Jeff. That's an interesting concept. I'm not sure how you would add something like that to a regular hammock such as a Claytor Jungle hammock. (I have one coming) It seems like you would have to do something with the netting etc. It's probably one of those things you just have to see in person. I'm not at all sure howthe line is attached to the hammock itself. I'll poke around your site and see what I find.

Miguel

Rat
10-18-2006, 12:57
Adding a structural ridge-line to the Claytor wouldn't be that hard. However, you would also need a non-structural ridge-line for the netting, or some type of loops in the tarp to attach it to. Or maybe the netting would just lie on the ridge-line, but it seems to me it would have too much sag for that, maybe not.

Here is a picture showing how the ridge-line works. The supportd are tight but the body of the hammock has just the right sag for me.

The second picture shows how I attach it to my hammock. I call it "through the whip suspension". I just make a loop and attach the ridge-line to that. I use 550 cord for my ridge-line, it's a little stretchy, but once I get it right it is good.

Rat
10-18-2006, 13:03
http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l37/hogn8r/HanginOut.jpg
http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l37/hogn8r/ThryTheWhipSupport1.jpg

Miguel
10-18-2006, 15:10
Thanks Hogn8r...that pretty much clears it up for me. I'd have to try it both ways to see if I liked it or not. I suppose with a home made system you could put it where you want it but I'm guessing with a Hennesy you take what you get.

Miguel

blackbishop351
10-18-2006, 15:17
You got it, Miguel - the Hennessy ridge is built-in. I wanted to adjust the length of mine (and make it detachable), so I had to cut it and insert a 'biner.

Old River Rat
08-10-2010, 13:22
I have been playing around with a homemade hammock and was a bit disappointed until I added a ridgeline. It has increased the comfort factor quite a bit. I am finding that if you build your own there can be a lot of tuning and tweeking.