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12trysomething
05-09-2016, 08:34
As the well used backpacking quote goes, "you pack your fears" - and fears seem to be really heavy. I share in this blog how I overcame my fears and was able to carry a lighter load in doing so. Click below to read and if you do...thanks for reading.

~ Rob


Lighten The Load (http://www.backpackingadventures.net/blog/params/post/839595/Lighten-The-Load)

BigE94
05-09-2016, 08:56
Good article. I definitely have some gear decisions to make. I like your method.

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OneClick
05-09-2016, 08:58
Good read, thanks Rob! I also like to take my thermometer which records the low temp, so I have a good idea of how my gear worked throughout the day and overnight. I always make note of the type of weather to my lists after getting home so I know what works best for next time. Sometimes a trip will have the exact same weather as a trip I took in the past, which really gives me confidence in the gear I take. Clothing is always the biggest variable: tshirt + windshirt? Long sleeve only? Any base layers needed?

captaincoupal
05-09-2016, 09:49
Great article, thanks for writing it up. One thing I learned from taking Wilderness First Aid is that there are a lot of things in the "canned" first-aid kits that I don't expect to ever use. There's a great guide on treefool's website on building your own lightweight first aid (https://treefool.com/2014/02/10/a-serious-lesson-in-first-aid/). Lots of stuff to leave at home there.

sidvicious
05-09-2016, 10:14
well done.

sv-

AlanH
05-09-2016, 10:15
Nice write up and your right. I'm a over prepper. 3 set of battery's, saw, hatchet etc. Carry more then I need trying to be prepared for all types of emergency's. Like the checklist idea. Just watched your video on packing your backpack. Great video. Have to wean off a few things.
Take care,
Al

jewelbug
05-09-2016, 18:31
Thanks for the article! Makes me think about all the "what ifs" I plan for that never happen!


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Scarecrow
05-09-2016, 23:57
I definitely have the problem of bringing too much out to the woods. Last trip I did, I was carrying 35 lbs. worth of kit, and it was just an overnighter. :scared:

I made a gear weight list a while back, but since I've acquired new items and got rid of some others, the list was in serious need of a revision as it didn't reflect everything in my current inventory. After that last 35 lb pack load, I made a point of it to fix my list, and seriously reconsider what I'll be taking on upcoming trips.

bobbycobbler
05-10-2016, 06:59
Can't wait for my next trip. it'll be hotter and i have trimmed alot of weight. down to about 12 lbs with some luxuries still intact (stool, larger knife, cool ridgeline lights ....) For me, its not really about being ultralight. Its more about finding out what I really dont need, and how I can double duty a few things. I'll probaby add back about 3 pounds thought in smoked keilbasa and fritos with bean dip :)

Singingcrowsings
05-10-2016, 07:26
So true. It's amazing how much lighter my pack became once I noted what I didn't use.

BigMac
05-10-2016, 07:26
I thoroughly enjoyed your article. I am new to the hammock camping world and will be taking my first trip in 2 weeks. As I'm sure everyone has I have always over prepared for a trip planning for the just in case that never happens. I think instead I will use your checklist idea and see how things work out. Seems like a good system...and besides if I don't like it I can always go back to taking the kitchen sink with me right?

jadekayak
05-10-2016, 07:34
That's a good read.
I'm always looking to cut what I don't need so I can carry more food/booze.
That means I don't have to make a food run too often.

I mostly go motorcycle camping at a particular gold panning spot so I take a sluice and matt and a bucket n pan.
Wet clothes are a biggy for me and of course loads of liquid(far to little booze I'm afraid)

sidvicious
05-10-2016, 07:49
i just finished a winter-to-summer gear change.

ditch the nalgenes for the platypus.
swap the siphon filter for the gravity feed.
swap zero degree full length UQ for 3/4 20 degree.
thin spare clothes.

this is a pretty good start for my rig....

cheers,

sv

JmBoh
05-10-2016, 07:52
Great article and absolutely spot on!! I haven't been an avid hiker/backpacker for most of a decade. My life got busy and I got lost. My love for the outdoors is reborn and I often prefer to sleep outside, even at home. As I have recently discovered hammocks, the annoyance of being hunched over on the cold ground inside a tent have gone and my wanderlust has returned with a vengeance. As I researched and upgraded my gear, I find myself with more stuff (and a bigger credit card bill). As I pack, think things through and repack time and again, I find myself having lengthy talks with the wanderer in me about what I really need versus what I THINK I need. I feel like a rookie all over again. lol Last year my pack was nearly , if not over, 30 lbs. This year it's down to 20lbs or less. I continue to refine my stuff knowing better what goes in the pack and what stays home. Thanks for this article, as it is a validation to me that what I have gone through is an evolution of experience, and ultimately, I'll be fine without the extra "just in case" items. I really enjoy your articles and the spirit behind your blog!! Keep 'em coming!!

michigandave
05-10-2016, 07:57
Nice job on the article. I don't use a checklist of what I use/don't use, but just use a large plastic storage container where I put the variety of gear that I bring (quilts, tarps, backpack are separate anyway based on season). When I get back from a trip, I just make a mental note, then when I pack for my next, I lay out what I think I need, then go through item by item about what I really need to take.

Heading out next week for a 4 day trip, so I'll be laying out everything this weekend. I know I always pack way too much food, so, I'll start there....

OneClick
05-10-2016, 08:06
Heading out next week for a 4 day trip, so I'll be laying out everything this weekend. I know I always pack way too much food, so, I'll start there....

I hate food!! Well no, I love it, but hate how it gets bulky and heavy SO quick. A simple pack of poptarts for each morning, few tortillas, small bag of gorp, few packit gourmet meals, cheese sticks, crackers, jerky = 4lbs and a full 10L sack! And that's simple, lightweight eating. If I ate like I usually do at home, I'd be hauling a 15lb sack of food.

sidvicious
05-10-2016, 08:11
I hate food!! Well no, I love it, but hate how it gets bulky and heavy SO quick. A simple pack of poptarts for each morning, few tortillas, small bag of gorp, few packit gourmet meals, cheese sticks, crackers, jerky = 4lbs and a full 10L sack! And that's simple, lightweight eating. If I ate like I usually do at home, I'd be hauling a 15lb sack of food.

this ain't far off the mark for me as well.

add mike&ike for the pockets.........

and milk duds...

sv-

jadekayak
05-11-2016, 04:08
I just discoverd instant mash by magi.tastes really great,comes in 3 varieties and get 3 meals out of small pack.
Also dehydrated mixed veg pack but getting hard to find in supermarkets now.
We also have a local manufacturer call back country foods who do about 15 different camping meals.
I get 3 serves from the double pack and I love to eat.
They cost around $14 a double though.
I also take oats in ziplock bag with dried fruit in it.
Just have to learn how to dehydrate meats so I still have that for full homemade meals

mayhemkb
05-11-2016, 11:20
I hate food!! Well no, I love it, but hate how it gets bulky and heavy SO quick. A simple pack of poptarts for each morning, few tortillas, small bag of gorp, few packit gourmet meals, cheese sticks, crackers, jerky = 4lbs and a full 10L sack! And that's simple, lightweight eating. If I ate like I usually do at home, I'd be hauling a 15lb sack of food.

Me too. . .no matter how much I simplify I still have a ton of weight for food. It doesn't matter if it is dehydrated or not you still need to carry the water weight. . .

sidvicious
05-11-2016, 11:29
Me too. . .no matter how much I simplify I still have a ton of weight for food. It doesn't matter if it is dehydrated or not you still need to carry the water weight. . .

water is often a constant variable for me. everyone else too, i wager....

i hike with Dewey [my scottie]. if i plan on camping on tops, then water has to be considered before hand, of course. pack it in, or, go down later. this all depends on source location. unless i'm dead sure i can short-hike after setting up, i pack it in.

AND, dewey loves water........

sv-

cmseeley
05-11-2016, 11:31
Great article!

I am definitely guilty of the heavy pack! Thanks for the tips Rob. I know I almost always carry way too much water and food, as well as extra clothes. I will definitely use your checklist idea.

mayhemkb
05-11-2016, 11:57
water is often a constant variable for me. everyone else too, i wager....

i hike with Dewey [my scottie]. if i plan on camping on tops, then water has to be considered before hand, of course. pack it in, or, go down later. this all depends on source location. unless i'm dead sure i can short-hike after setting up, i pack it in.

AND, dewey loves water........

sv-

Yeah we have 2 dogs that come with us and one is a drinker. They carry some of their stuff. I have a nice low base weight (8-10 lbs. depending on conditions) but, water and food are what kill me.

southernfire97
05-28-2016, 13:22
I do this in the medical dept. I guess being a paramedic causes me to think about what all could happen. I need to cut my FAK down by at least half.

scoutmaster405
06-23-2016, 20:14
Great Job.

Dog Listener
06-24-2016, 18:05
I just discoverd instant mash by magi.tastes really great,comes in 3 varieties and get 3 meals out of small pack.
Also dehydrated mixed veg pack but getting hard to find in supermarkets now.
We also have a local manufacturer call back country foods who do about 15 different camping meals.
I get 3 serves from the double pack and I love to eat.
They cost around $14 a double though.
I also take oats in ziplock bag with dried fruit in it.
Just have to learn how to dehydrate meats so I still have that for full homemade meals

Dog Listener
06-24-2016, 18:13
I have found if I precook things like oatmeal, rice, pasta and dehydrate them, they are far lighter to carry. I make separate meals like dehydrated oatmeal with cinnamon, sweetener of choice, dehydrated bananas or apples, in a baggie then vacuum seal for space. For dinner my favorite is precooked and dehydrated wild rice, sausage, beans and kale with spices of choice. I make a crock pot full, spread it on dehydrator trays in serving portions and ziplock then vacuum seal for space saving. Precooking your carbs really can save weight.

MikekiM
06-26-2016, 08:03
Great discussion

I use the three pile method post trip. Pile one, things I used at least twice, or are otherwise essential (first aid kit, TP). Like two, items that I used only once. Pile three.. You get the idea. Things I didn't use at all, but aren't essential.. Those would be in pile one.

Pile three.. These come off my list, no discussion. (I use Lighterpack.com).

Pile one, these likely come with me next trip but I do take a minute to identify whether there is a lighter alternative. I don't use my Leatherman Squirt every trip but I know I need some kind of cutting implement. Over time I have gone from the full size Leatherman to the smaller, lighter Squirt as an example. More often it's a simple neck knife because, well, I like neck knives.

Pile two is where the real fun is. Items I used, but sparingly. Here's where most of the opportunity exists. First step is determine whether they are single purpose items. My stove, spoon and tooth brush are a good examples. I have yet to find a second purpose for a spoon and refuse to try to identify a second use for my toothbrush.

All the single purpose items (not many left in my kit at this point) go in a sub-pile and I focus on whether I can combine any of them, or replace them with a more, multi use item.

If not, I look for a lighter, leaner, smaller version or look to modify what I am using. I replaced my 1.9 oz Snow Peak LiteMax stove with a smaller, version (can't remember the name). I could reduce that more but I'm not a fan of alcohol stoves. Spoon is now a Ti long handle.. I don't think I can improve on that other than to shorten it. Water filter is a gravity feed, slow but it's the lightest I can find. Tooth brush has gone through iterations.. Wisp works well as does a cut down, bamboo handles version.

It's an evolution that has my overnight base weight down to under twenty pounds.

Now if someone could create freeze dried water I'd be golden! Just add water and... Never mind.


Sent from East of Montauk

DWEpic
07-31-2016, 06:24
Perfect article for me to read this morning. I had just taken a ton of stuff that I realized I've never actually used and threw it into my storage tote. I'm now down to a surprisingly small pile of gear, with some significant luxury items (Sven saw, Jetboil, ground chair, etc) still in the mix. I'm pumped to see what it actually weighs out once I pack it all up. I was at 17lbs base weight before which included my Glock but not the ground chair. Still may pack that glock though...

dedenburn
08-03-2016, 13:07
Good read...thanks for sharing. I've got my "base weight" down to just over 10 pounds (not including food or fishing equipment, of course). At this point, cutting ounces is getting expen$ive. I've used Excel to track weights, but recently discovered www.lighterpack.com and it's pretty handy.

Here's an idea for those of you who mentioned heavy food loads: look at the nutrition labels for things you take...divide the number of calories in a serving by the number of ounces to get the caloric density. Try not to take anything that's less than 100 calories per ounce. Figure out how many calories you need based on activity level and only take that much. On my last trip, my food load was only 28 ounces per day (including packaging) using this method and I was never hungry or short on energy.

ouroboros
09-16-2016, 21:26
As others have mentioned, putting the ideas presented in this article to practice really can have some significant results when it comes to weight shaving.

I've cut down (maybe simplified is a better word) quite a bit of my gear over this past year. For example, I always used to use this little lantern that I'd hang on a little loop at my tent ceiling, or more recently, my hammock ridgeline... but, now I just hang my head lamp and it does the same thing. It does leave me without a secondary dedicated light source, but, I have a cell phone which can generate some light for immediate area things, bic lighter and a ferrocerium rod during every trip which could be used to fashion candles or torches, so there are lighting options abound if the head lamp failed or was lost. I do take one set of extra batteries for the head lamp.

This is obviously just one tiny example but it goes to show how dual/tri/quad-purposing items can seriously shave weight.

If you are conscious of what items are more breakable and where in your pack you keep them while hiking or where you store them around camp, you can really minimize accidents or other mishaps that might screw up your gear.

I don't take a pillow, I just pile up all of my extra clothing, empty stuff sacks, anything else soft, in a stuff sack and call it a pillow. A stuff sack full of leaves works too.

I carve my own tent stakes out of sticks. Takes very little time at all to do with a Fallkniven F1 fixed blade. They "stick" better than any store-bought ones for me because I make them around 12" long and 1/2-1" diameter.

If I'm in an area with plenty of (or at least a moderate amount of) water, I let my Sawyer Squeeze water filter do its job and pack in less water. If something goes wrong with the Sawyer, I still would have my titanium cook set that I could boil water in. I carry a 3L bladder but rarely have to fill it all the way.

There's plenty of other things like this... just look at your little items and see what you can "combine" together if that makes sense.

airbud
09-16-2016, 22:41
Whoa... so glad I stumbled upon this thread. Lots to think about. Thanks everybody.

quickdraw
09-17-2016, 08:23
Nice read. My problem is my fears are usually centered around the unpredictability of the weather. I have seen it get 25 degrees below the forecast, so Now I always want to pack for that.

FJRpilot
09-17-2016, 11:40
Nice read. My problem is my fears are usually centered around the unpredictability of the weather. I have seen it get 25 degrees below the forecast, so Now I always want to pack for that.

Then down will always be your best friend....


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mpvisc00
10-05-2016, 09:39
What do you folks do for clothing? Other than warmth layers, do you bring extra socks or underwear, spare shirt? I always seem to pack an extra pair of socks and boxers, and a shirt for my weekend backpacking trips, but (hopefully not tmi), I never use em. Im okay dropping some societal decency and living in the grubby clothes for too long so long as they arent soaked.
My gear weight has gone down a lot since switching to a hammock, and paying attention to what I use on the trail. I love the idea of comparing calories to weight - that seems a great way to shave off excess food. But the clothes are always my big fear that I pack.

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OneClick
10-05-2016, 09:52
What do you folks do for clothing? Other than warmth layers, do you bring extra socks or underwear, spare shirt? I always seem to pack an extra pair of socks and boxers, and a shirt for my weekend backpacking trips, but (hopefully not tmi), I never use em. Im okay dropping some societal decency and living in the grubby clothes for too long so long as they arent soaked.
My gear weight has gone down a lot since switching to a hammock, and paying attention to what I use on the trail. I love the idea of comparing calories to weight - that seems a great way to shave off excess food. But the clothes are always my big fear that I pack.


- I have a hiking shirt, socks and pants.
- Fresh pair of boxers each night unless it's more than 2 nights; then I'll start "doing laundry" and hope the other pair dries in time. TMI, but I ran out of TP once, so I took out my knife and sacrificed a pair of boxers. Worth losing $3!
- Also socks and a shirt just for sleeping, which is always nice to have for backups as well. Dry, clean sleeping clothes is a must.

Food sucks. I went pretty basic for my 4 night/5 day trip coming up and it's 5 pounds of a 10L drybag pretty much full. That's a huge chunk of my pack. No way around it really unless I want to eat 12 clif bars the whole time.

Scarecrow
10-05-2016, 12:13
What do you folks do for clothing? Other than warmth layers, do you bring extra socks or underwear, spare shirt? I always seem to pack an extra pair of socks and boxers, and a shirt for my weekend backpacking trips, but (hopefully not tmi), I never use em. Im okay dropping some societal decency and living in the grubby clothes for too long so long as they arent soaked.
My gear weight has gone down a lot since switching to a hammock, and paying attention to what I use on the trail. I love the idea of comparing calories to weight - that seems a great way to shave off excess food. But the clothes are always my big fear that I pack.

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Regardless of trip length, I always carry one full set of clothes in the pack.
1 pair of wool hiking socks
1 pair of boxers
1 pair of hiking pants (prAna Stretch Zion pants or REI Adventure Pants)
1 t-shirt (lightweight and synthetic)
1 pair of mid weight synthetic thermal pants
1 lightweight synthetic thermal shirt

mpvisc00
10-05-2016, 12:29
Regardless of trip length, I always carry one full set of clothes in the pack.
1 pair of wool hiking socks
1 pair of boxers
1 pair of hiking pants (prAna Stretch Zion pants or REI Adventure Pants)
1 t-shirt (lightweight and synthetic)
1 pair of mid weight synthetic thermal pants
1 lightweight synthetic thermal shirt
How often has the spare set come into use? Im too lazy to change clothes on my weekend excursions unless they are soaked. Spare socks I wont go without because if the need is there, its crucial

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Scarecrow
10-05-2016, 13:07
How often has the spare set come into use? Im too lazy to change clothes on my weekend excursions unless they are soaked. Spare socks I wont go without because if the need is there, its crucial

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75% of the time, I find myself having to change out of everything except for the boxers. This is typically due to the wet weather that I hike and camp in. More often than not, I hike in the rain. Other times, I may have an incident where I fall in to a river or lake while exploring and working on photography (yeah, I'm that clumsy guy. Haha). The thermals are just there to either sleep in, or I'll use them early in the morning because it's generally just pretty cold in the high country during the morning hours (usually upper 30's or low 40's during the summer when I do most my hiking).

In short, I carry what I do because of the nature of my hikes, and my activities (often times) warrant the need for the extra clothing. YMMV

vladdtoo
10-05-2016, 15:54
This thread shared a lot of good insights. Living in the Pacific NW, rain is pretty much inevitable. But a hiker can only carry so many changes of clothing. So I'm interested in the ways that others deal with 3, 4, 5 day trips in wet conditions. Any gear recommendations or great techniques?

OneClick
10-06-2016, 07:12
This thread shared a lot of good insights. Living in the Pacific NW, rain is pretty much inevitable. But a hiker can only carry so many changes of clothing. So I'm interested in the ways that others deal with 3, 4, 5 day trips in wet conditions. Any gear recommendations or great techniques?

I've never done a lot in the rain, but I think a lot of people keep a dry set for sleeping/camp. The other set is just always damp since you may not be able to hang and dry it even over a 12hr period in camp. That's as good as you can get, so just put those damp clothes back on and get moving to stay warm. Doesn't sound pleasant, but it can work.

Mtn hanger
10-06-2016, 07:20
One of the reasons I'm going to a smaller pack is so I can't carry as much. I definitely care way too much I still carry stuff I have never used in all the trips I've made. My wife is worse that I am though and all she will do is day hikes we was going on a 4-5 mile hike the other day any my day pack after she packed it weighed 16+ pounds. I know the need to lighten up and appreciate this thread.

JasonACraft
10-06-2016, 10:31
I've never done a lot in the rain, but I think a lot of people keep a dry set for sleeping/camp. The other set is just always damp since you may not be able to hang and dry it even over a 12hr period in camp. That's as good as you can get, so just put those damp clothes back on and get moving to stay warm. Doesn't sound pleasant, but it can work.

This is what I did this past weekend. Basically it poured the first 24 hours and stayed good and damp for the next 48. Damp, quick drying clothes during the day, dry in the pack and for bed. Worked really well. Also the first time i've ever used the packcover/ gear hammock. That was wonderful for keeping all my junk outta the mud.

Offtopic: first time carrying a stool, that was a great comfort during the downpours. Made lots of coffee
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161006/bcf5399e374353a7342252bd7f626cd6.jpg

Secondmouse
10-06-2016, 11:24
This is what I did this past weekend. Basically it poured the first 24 hours and stayed good and damp for the next 48. Damp, quick drying clothes during the day, dry in the pack and for bed. Worked really well. Also the first time i've ever used the packcover/ gear hammock. That was wonderful for keeping all my junk outta the mud.

Offtopic: first time carrying a stool, that was a great comfort during the downpours. Made lots of coffee
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161006/bcf5399e374353a7342252bd7f626cd6.jpg

pack cover/gear hammock?

what stool is that?..

OneClick
10-06-2016, 11:42
Looks like the good ol Stansport stool. Love that thing! 17oz, cradles the pack so it doesn't take up any space. Not quite "free" as the thread states but close enough for what you get.

JasonACraft
10-06-2016, 13:01
pack cover/gear hammock?

what stool is that?..

It *is* the stansport, price, weight, comfort all checked out for me.

Pack cover into gear hammock?

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Ehammockforums%2E net%2Fforum%2Fshowthread%2Ephp%3Ft%3D108560&share_tid=108560&share_fid=20351&share_type=t

Here's my thread from when I did it. I'm always carrying a pair of speedhooks on 6' of line anyway (for hanging extra junk) so I strung the pack cover off my suspension, biased towards the feet.

Secondmouse
10-07-2016, 11:59
thank you. unfortunately I can't access the link you posted. I get a message that says I don't have permission. any other ideas?..

JasonACraft
10-07-2016, 12:05
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161007/11b2c5358a08dec28b84e38a8ecbb4ba.jpg
No worries. Here's my silargon dutch packcover, i sewed some 4" grosgrain tabs on there, in the corners that are already cut out.

Secondmouse
10-07-2016, 15:44
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161007/11b2c5358a08dec28b84e38a8ecbb4ba.jpg
No worries. Here's my silargon dutch packcover, i sewed some 4" grosgrain tabs on there, in the corners that are already cut out.

excellent, what a great idea. thank you...

jtstoner
03-22-2017, 16:14
Good advice. I tend to pack for every eventuality. This gives me some things to reconsider.

The Marine
04-02-2017, 10:59
Great Article!

DevonHowton
04-04-2017, 17:50
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161007/11b2c5358a08dec28b84e38a8ecbb4ba.jpg
No worries. Here's my silargon dutch packcover, i sewed some 4" grosgrain tabs on there, in the corners that are already cut out.

Great idea, but how am I gonna get my drum set out into the woods with me? :shades:

Scarecrow
04-04-2017, 17:55
Great idea, but how am I gonna get my drum set out into the woods with me? :shades:
Need a roadie. Lol

Scott8691
04-04-2017, 18:39
Nice article Rob!


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JasonACraft
04-04-2017, 21:11
Great idea, but how am I gonna get my drum set out into the woods with me? :shades:
Bushcraft man! Gotta make some once you set up camp. Be sure to bring a spare pan for copper sifting and smelting though.


Need a roadie. Lol
My roadie stopped packing the drums once I put a ring on it. Amazingly, that seemed to be the end of my gigging days too...

curlymaple42
04-19-2017, 10:40
I need to make one of those drum stick storage pouches for my kit!! Lol!

Brommeland
10-12-2017, 14:27
Excellent article. Thanks for posting - this covers exactly the problem that I have been wrestling with myself lately.

Paddles Down
01-13-2018, 00:55
Thanks for sharing and good food for thought

huntaholic123
04-09-2018, 09:03
good read! Thanks for sharing

Cylinder9
04-03-2019, 15:27
Nice article.

OneClick
08-20-2019, 13:58
Playing around with the list for my next trip:

No stool: saved 17oz
No beer: saved ~13-26oz (usually one or two cans)
No pillow: saved 4oz
No saw: saved 7oz

Total saved: up to 3.38lbs. But I think I will have lost 14.92lbs of fun and comfort in the woods.

cmoulder
08-20-2019, 20:11
Stool... foam sit pad on a rock. Sit pad is also backpack pad.

Beer.... warm beer. Really?

Pillow... stuff sack stuffed with, um, stuff.

Saw... for what? Have fun making a fire with only a ferro rod. OK, you can cheat with PJCB (petroleum jelly cotton ball). But it's fun to find other stuff that works well, such as cattail fluff, birch bark, very dry beech leaves, etc.

OneClick
08-21-2019, 07:24
Beer.... warm beer. Really?


1000% really. Ask Michigandave how awesome this is, or any beer lover for that matter.

Can't say I ever had it "warm" though.

michigandave
08-21-2019, 07:37
1000% really. Ask Michigandave how awesome this is, or any beer lover for that matter.

Can't say I ever had it "warm" though.Cooled off in the stream, it was perfect and complimented the cherry pie.

I've done the traditional first night beer for years and a little extra weight to bring me some joy is well worth it to me.https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190821/3e61cd58955c38a7bddfcd090c2c1b85.jpg

cneill13
08-21-2019, 07:45
My base weight is around 9 pounds total but with all my luxury items (Helinox chair and table, trans. radio, blue tooth speaker, Sven saw, candle lanterns, AHE hammock chair and other things), my ending pack weight is around 20 pounds not including food and booze.

Is this heavy? It is all relative. If your pack is too heavy, get in better shape. That is the key.

If you want to go camping with the bare essentials, that is your choice. I choose to go and live large. And by exercising at least 4 days a week, I don't even feel the weight on my back.

OneClick
08-21-2019, 07:51
I think it's just a "win" when your pack is light as possible. I carried 32lb last month due to a packraft, PFD and paddles. It carried well and I didn't notice it so much, but obviously my usual 23lb load was missed. Even if I could carry 50lbs, I wouldn't. I imagine it's not good for your back, feet, joints, cartilage, etc. no matter your physical condition. Just being cautious, preventative maintenance for later years :)

I keep an eye on "runners" for a good example. Approaching that 40 year old area, a lot of friends are complaining about things. One has bad knees, another back, another foot and knee. And the similar mentality is "working to get back out there". That's a good positive attitude, but what got them there in the first place? You could argue genetics, bad technique, gear, etc. But I think Occam's razor applies.

cmoulder
08-21-2019, 08:52
My base weight is around 9 pounds total but with all my luxury items (Helinox chair and table, trans. radio, blue tooth speaker, Sven saw, candle lanterns, AHE hammock chair and other things), my ending pack weight is around 20 pounds not including food and booze.

Is this heavy? It is all relative. If your pack is too heavy, get in better shape. That is the key.

If you want to go camping with the bare essentials, that is your choice. I choose to go and live large. And by exercising at least 4 days a week, I don't even feel the weight on my back.

No worries, carry what you will.

I'm responding to the thread title and linked article which is intended for people interested in lightening their loads. This becomes more of a factor for backpacking trips where elevation is a concern.

https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/7/4/1/1/4/grafton_loop_profile.jpg

mickg
08-24-2019, 02:32
i do similar.
if haven't used something for 6 trips out it goes.
somethings still stay that get used rarely but are absolutes when are needed, so they stay.
but have ditched loads of stuff this way.

Five Tango
08-24-2019, 11:09
My base weight is around 9 pounds total but with all my luxury items (Helinox chair and table, trans. radio, blue tooth speaker, Sven saw, candle lanterns, AHE hammock chair and other things), my ending pack weight is around 20 pounds not including food and booze.

Is this heavy? It is all relative. If your pack is too heavy, get in better shape. That is the key.

If you want to go camping with the bare essentials, that is your choice. I choose to go and live large. And by exercising at least 4 days a week, I don't even feel the weight on my back.

If it's not too much trouble,could you share your pack list with us?

OneClick
09-30-2019, 12:28
I just got back from a 5 day, 4 night (we left in the afternoon on day 4) trip. I weighed my pack at 25.89lb.

After consumables:
1L water
2 16-oz beers
Food
Fuel

The base would be about 15.5lb. I can't crack that, but I'm not upset about it either. Dropping the saw and stool would have shaved a full pound. A new pack would drop another. But I'm stubborn there.

Bama
09-30-2019, 12:43
Great read. I usually unload my pack and evaluate everything i used or did not and decide if will take it again.

slugbait
10-01-2019, 10:37
Ha ha- you didn't even mention dropping the 2 pounds of beer!

OneClick
10-01-2019, 11:58
Ha ha- you didn't even mention dropping the 2 pounds of beer!

:) I left the other two in the car. Looking back, I would have taken them along as well. We got by on Everclear and lemonade mix. Alcoholics.

michigandave
10-01-2019, 13:53
:) I left the other two in the car. Looking back, I would have taken them along as well. We got by on Everclear and lemonade mix. Alcoholics.That Everclear was nasty and diiirrrty....best use is stove fuel. Should have brought the beers.

OneClick
10-01-2019, 13:57
That Everclear was nasty and diiirrrty....best use is stove fuel. Should have brought the beers.

Now that I think about it, that may have been stove fuel.

BillyBob58
10-05-2019, 00:42
Great thread! Some of it is indeed "we pack our fears", AKA safety. But some of it is luxury while camping vs the most efficient hiking ability with the least wear and tear on the old body. And some of that is strictly personal pref, what it is we are looking for when we hit the trail.

I could probably drop a few oz by getting rid of my hammock which would allow me to use a smaller tarp on the ground, like I used to do. But that ain't happening, LOL!

35 years ago, my pack was 75 lbs(climbing and cold weather gear), did not come out of the wilderness for 30 days except about every 7 days to go to food caches just outside the wilderness boundary, spot marked on a topo map. I saw toilet paper mentioned earlier. We had it available for emergencies, if some one got ill. We learned to use natural substitutes. Wet evergreens, snow was a favorite. But considering the weight of our packs, I guess that was mostly just to reduce impact on the environment.

During the next decade or 2 for 5-7 day trips to the same or similar mountains( usually sleeping above 10000 ft), I got those loads down to 40-50 lbs(no climbing gear for 1 thing) and that seemed like a vast improvement. These day, closer to 30 lbs, even with hammock gear and one big tarp per person(instead of one big tarp for 2 or 3). So much easier! Without giving up much for luxury, actually increasing it considering the hammocks. For a weekend in not so cold weather, I can get that down to 15-20 lbs. Good enough for me. Seems like paradise compared to the old days. Plus, I am infinitely more comfy than I ever was on the ground even at 35 years old(70 now) or younger. It is luxury!

Camp stools are handy for sitting around the camp fire, but I normally use a sit pad on a rock or log, i.e. when I am not using my hammock as a comfy seat. Since I am always going to have that sit pad with me anyway, I can save a few more oz with a short UQ, and just use the pad for my legs. Works for me.

For clothing and even quilts, I sometimes think I can save weight over all by replacing one layer of Long Johns- especially during cold weather when I might have multiple layers of clothing- with my lined VB clothing. This is a long term experiment not fully completed yet- but I do find a thin layer of VBs adds a whole lot of warmth, plus keeps all my other layers and quilts much drier. Which means I can maybe reduce some weight there. Or, just have extra security and luxurious warmth around camp. But not many folks go that route, and I am still testing.

Luxurious camping vs luxurious( i.e. easier) hiking, sometimes it is hard to decide!

Bob-W
06-19-2020, 03:35
A bit of a thread resurrection! I'm new here and was just wandering around and came across this thread.

Interesting that there's a lot of cross-pollination of kit and techniques between different activities. I started climbing in the early 1980s and when you were hiking up to a crag you tended to want to take as little as possible to save energy for the actual climbing. We'd take our personal kit: harness, helmet, shoes and the like, but we'd split the rest of the kit rather than take a full rack each. We'd agonise (a little) over each piece of kit especially the heavy and bulky cams. Then I moved on to the mountains, in my case the Alps, when you have to carry everything you agonise (a lot) over each piece of kit. All that was with much heavier gear than available today, 60g biners vs 25g today for example.

Move forward forty years and I'm into bikepacking where both weight and bulk are the "enemies" and the same principles apply. I do, or did, the three pile trick after each trip: used it; didn't use it; would be up a certain creek without a means of locomotion if I didn't take it. That last pile is basically first aid kit and repair kit/spares for the bike. Nowadays I pretty much know for a given trip what I need to take, maybe an extra layer if it's going to be colder, etc. The only real variable is food but here in the UK you have to actively aim to avoid towns and villages if you were determined to carry a week's supply.

Repackaging things can save weight and space - freeze dried camp meals are a good example, they are designed for a long shelf life and being handled by shop staff and customers. Since you are going to be using it within a day or two decant the contents into a pour and store ziplock bag, squeeze the air out, seal and you have saved a significant amount of weight and bulk but no functionality. I'll take a single water bottle (750ml) and a water filter (200g) rather than three litres of water - I'm trading one convenience for another. (Might not work so well in the desert!)

Sometimes it's a case of "robbing Peter to pay Paul" so if there's a particular area where I won't compromise even if there's a lighter, but not as effective, alternative then I'll cut the weight elsewhere to make up: I'll always take a set of base layer thermals to change into at camp/bivy for example, they are an instant hit of warmth after sweaty clothes and also protect my quilt from damp and body oils. They don't get used for anything else.

Ultimately it's about balancing weight and bulk vs convenience and comfort or maybe needs vs wants. A lot is down to experience, I know how my body (and mind) react to given conditions so only need to deal with what's predicted plus a little bit for safety.

There's a viking saying: "Better weight than wisdom, a traveller cannot carry". Applies as much today as it did back in the tenth century.

cmoulder
06-19-2020, 05:15
Indeed, I have found that developing skills negates the need for "stuff" in many instances.

mcimes
07-01-2020, 18:47
I have to transition my mindset between Glamping with my wife and ultralight which means leaving "all" the "necessities". So far so good ;)

Not exactly free, but I just found titanium pots and bottles on aliexpress for about half of amazon. 50% of free is better than full price!

SilvrSurfr
07-01-2020, 22:28
There are some things I will always carry, regardless of whether I use it or not. My medical kit - ain't gonna change. In fact, it might get bigger. I think I'm at about 5 ounces for medical supplies, but I really want to add something to sew up minor cuts (less than 15 stitches).

When I was about 15 years old, I went on a canoe trip out into the Alabama wilderness. We were miles from nowhere. As soon as we got to the campsite, I slipped on the rocks and cut my knee wide open! You could see ligaments and tendons. The adult leader took a look and said, "I can sew that up good as new." I was not very keen on the idea, but he explained to me that going to the emergency room wasn't really an option since we were 25 miles away from the nearest road. So I had no choice.

But wait a minute, I said: Where's the painkiller? The adult leader had all the right equipment - a suture needle (curved) and catgut thread, but he didn't have a vial of novocaine and a needle. I had never heard of surgery without painkiller, so I wasn't happy with him stitching me back together again. It only took about 10-15 stitches to sew me up. I got mad respect from my fellow campers for quietly suffering through the stitch up.

Spent about 10 days out in the wilderness after the accident and it healed up pretty nice. However, I dread to think what would have happened if that wound hadn't been stitched up.

Like my adult leader, I'd like to be that guy one day who says "I can fix that up good as new."

cmoulder
07-02-2020, 08:26
I once ripped open a knee similar to yours in a mountain biking accident. Really nasty with blood, mud and whatnot. I used about 4 or 5 of these butterfly closures (https://www.seton.com/goodsense-butterfly-bandages-9122c.html?utm_campaign=PC-20-NDF_CatchAll_Seton_PLA_NB_NC_Google_US&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&matchtype=&device=c&adgroupid=All+Products&keycode=WS0282&gclid=CjwKCAjwi_b3BRAGEiwAemPNU1xzf7R2OkzvcwHu7xXX rwBtQcVFiVPNL_c9KhR2O63C3zLXfPLPVBoCZvQQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds) and they worked well. Went to the doc a couple days later to see about stitches but he said it was healing up nicely and to just let it be. I still carry these to this day in my medical kit that weighs about an ounce.

OneClick
10-07-2020, 07:16
Tomorrow I'll start a trip with more weight savings in mind. My typical pack weighs around 25lb including one can of beer for the first night. I can never do much better than that.

This time I'm looking at 22.7lb. I can get that to 21.45lb if I ditch the beer and saw, but being with another person it's nice to have a drink and cut some good firewood. So they'll stay in.

grubbster
10-07-2020, 11:35
Tomorrow I'll start a trip with more weight savings in mind. My typical pack weighs around 25lb including one can of beer for the first night. I can never do much better than that.

This time I'm looking at 22.7lb. I can get that to 21.45lb if I ditch the beer and saw, but being with another person it's nice to have a drink and cut some good firewood. So they'll stay in.
Liquor is lighter than beer. Just sayin....;)

Tpatter
10-07-2020, 12:47
What sort of pack do you have?

I upgraded my 15 year old pack this year and was shocked at the weight savings. My old tank of a pack weighed in around 6-7 pounds. My new one is about 2 and can still comfortably haul 35 pounds which is more than Iíll ever need. It was also cheaper than what I had paid for the original pack.

My son uses a frameless pack which I am seriously considering. His base weight is only 15 pounds and he practically runs circles around me when we are hiking! :). He creates a channel down the middle of the pack and puts everything in there with his thermolite seat along the back - works great. He said any more than 20 pounds or so and it gets uncomfortable.

OneClick
10-07-2020, 12:50
Liquor is lighter than beer. Just sayin....;)

I used to take a small 4oz flask of whiskey...and a 16oz bottle of Coke LOL!

I've been considering a ULA Ohm for such a long time. But I like the packs I use now and I would only save about 14oz. I'm afraid I would be sacrificing comfort for that. I think I'll just give it a try though.

Rolloff
10-07-2020, 16:36
Not this week, but the next two weeks, I'll be taking my new kit to the woods too for a good shakedown run.

My Sheltowee Bonfire Whisper came in a little over expected finish weight, but the extra ended up a result of slight overfill, but at 1.9lb I think I can live with that. That leaves me right @10.6 BW. I'm sure to have a few additional add-ons, but pretty happy with that.

I still pack a small flask and might even fire up the Ribz pack for the more social events. Beer always tastes really good at those