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View Full Version : Woman Responses Only Plz - Which hammock and why?



dkurfiss
03-02-2017, 07:37
If you were going to recommend a hammock to your female best friend who camps but not in a hammock, which one would it be any why?

I would most likely recommend a Table Cloth 12 foot blank and help them make their own. Being only 5'2" I never expected to need or like a 12' hammock but it is by far the most comfortable I own. The fabric stretches a bit and I think that along with the length really makes a difference in comfort for me.

So how about you?

DuneElliot
03-02-2017, 08:27
Since I am new to the whole hammock thing I went with Dutch's Hexon 1.0 because most of my camping is backpacking and I needed something lightweight. I guess it would depend on their budget but I don't think one can go wrong with a hammock from Dutch for the price.

tangara
03-02-2017, 08:30
I've been handing out Yukon doubles for anybody who's showed an interest - only two so far. One was 5'2" and 120 or so, the other about 5'5" and probably over 200. Both snuggled right in and had a happy night without issues. Well, one had a neck problem until I asked if she tried to use a pillow. Oops, forgot to really stress the point that the pillow should be smaller if needed at all. The doubles I have are from a few years ago and are a little over 10 feet long and six feet wide. Plenty of room to find a lay you like, and the best was the cost. I've gotten them all for under $20, the most recent from a thrift store (finally!) for $7, new.

akaCat
03-02-2017, 08:35
If you were going to recommend a hammock to your female best friend who camps but not in a hammock, which one would it be any why?

I would most likely recommend a Table Cloth 12 foot blank and help them make their own. Being only 5'2" I never expected to need or like a 12' hammock but it is by far the most comfortable I own. The fabric stretches a bit and I think that along with the length really makes a difference in comfort for me.

So how about you?

All I've ever used are gathered-end hammocks, so that's definitely what I'd recommend. I'm 5'6" and for myself, I think 11' is the minimum. I've tried shorter hammocks and while a 10.5' will do, the 11' is much more comfortable.

I sort of hate sewing, so my first recommendation would be a Dutch or Bearded Hanger hammock. (I love the fabric my BH is made from.) Though if I know that my friend is on a budget, I might skip that and go straight to the table cloth DIY. With the offer to let her borrow my sewing machine, but she's sewing it herself. :)

souperjen24
03-02-2017, 10:02
I was introduced to hammocks around 4 years ago when I got an ENO doublenest for my partner, just for us to take for relaxing when we went car camping. We were always able to take naps in them, but I did hate bugs and leaves falling on me, it always freaked me out.

When I decided I wanted to go backpacking 2 years ago and started researching, I was overwhelmed at all of the options, and the hammock options were no different. When I decided to take the leap, I was looking for an easy setup, a built-in bug net (I hate bugs), and something sort of lightweight. I ended up going with a Warbonnet Blackbird and I really, absolutely love it. I'm only 5'2 and a half, so a hammock being too short is not a problem for me. I still love my ENO as well, and if that's all a fellow woman had or could afford, I would encourage them to get out there and use it. In fact, my friend who hammock camps with me took her ENO when we went last year and it worked great for her. She's since bought a used hennessy hammock, so I'm looking forward to laying in that this year to get a feel for it.

jellyfish
03-02-2017, 10:40
The basic gathered end is always a winner in my book. It is easy to make, and affordable.

I've been thinking a lot about length lately because I'm planning to make a hammock for my niece for her 8th birthday. She is tall for her age, but is sort if swallowed up by my 11' GE hammock. Yet she wants a full size.

She will probably out grow anything smaller in short order.

sjlawrence
03-02-2017, 11:23
I would recommend an 11-12' hammock. I find that anything shorter causes more calf ridge problems for me even being 5'4". It's according to how much they want to spend and what kind of conditions (hiking vs car camping, time of year, area, etc) they will be camping in whether to recommend bug nets, etc.

Country Roads
03-02-2017, 18:47
I would probably recommend one of Dutch's hammocks. They are a good length for comfort and still lightweight. The price is reasonable. I would definitely loan a newbie one of my hammocks, to help them decide if a hammock would work. If the woman was handy with a sewing machine, I would recommend a DIY. Cheap and customizable. There is definitely a sense of satisfaction in using something that you have made.

Singingcrowsings
03-02-2017, 21:47
I have a 10' Dream Hammock Freebird 1.0. I bought it, because I didn't know which way I preferred to sleep in a hammock (thank goodness, because I prefer feet left when on my back), and I don't like being limited. Too, it is lightweight. Being a side/back/star-shaped sleeper and knowing I prefer a softer bed, I found the stretchiness of the lighter weight material is bliss, gentle on my hips. A firmer, thicker material is too stiff and will keep me awake. And not to mention, I can sit in it without a net!

Although I bought it before the 11' and now 12' hammocks really became available, at 5'7.5" I have no desire for a larger hammock for camping ( I have a Mayan For full-time sleeping). This Freebird is super comfortable, and as a minimalist, I really don't like taking up so much real estate. As a soloist who wanders into the deep bush, I also like to be able to fit into smaller spaces; this also gives me more choice in trees than if I had a larger hammock.

I put a lot of thought into it....

So in recommending a hammock, I could easily recommend DH Freebird or Raven, but would ask more about how firm they like their bed, where are they going to hang etc., before recommending the fabric and length.

tangara
03-03-2017, 08:29
( I have a Mayan For full-time sleeping). .

My favorite indoor sleeper is a cotton traditional hammock I got in Bolivia. I'm not sure if it was made locally or in Peru or Brazil, but they are 13' long, with cotton clews on each end of the bed, which is about 9 feet long. The cotton gives in every direction, so I've never had a problem with any kind of ridges, it's cool in summer and warmer in winter than the parachute nylon. I just use a regular homemade quilt to wrap in during colder weather (I keep the house pretty cool). Nothing better. When it's an option (no rain), I always let people enjoy the ride in one of those. They're what first got me into hammock camping.

dkurfiss
03-03-2017, 08:40
My favorite indoor sleeper is a cotton traditional hammock I got in Bolivia. I'm not sure if it was made locally or in Peru or Brazil, but they are 13' long, with cotton clews on each end of the bed, which is about 9 feet long. The cotton gives in every direction, so I've never had a problem with any kind of ridges, it's cool in summer and warmer in winter than the parachute nylon. I just use a regular homemade quilt to wrap in during colder weather (I keep the house pretty cool). Nothing better. When it's an option (no rain), I always let people enjoy the ride in one of those. They're what first got me into hammock camping.

I would love to sleep full time in one of the cotton hammocks. I had a chance to spend a night in one years ago at a friends house and loved it. You can bet my next place will have a spot big enough to accommodate one.

Karla "with a k"
03-03-2017, 09:05
If you were going to recommend a hammock to your female best friend who camps but not in a hammock, which one would it be any why?


I would recommend purchasing a hammock kit from one of the vendors and sew it yourself (or now that I've taught myself to sew, I would help you sew it). Worst case scenario, your friend hates it, sells its and gets her money back.

Ultimately, I would recommend coming to a hammock hang and letting her borrow someone's extra gear. Then, she could experience a hammock with no money involved and could see many different set-ups.

lilprincess
03-03-2017, 20:55
If price isn't an option, war bonnet blackbird. Extra space and comfortable. The footbox makes it easy to learn how to lie in a hammock for the first time.

To match a hammock with someone you need to know them. Are they comforted by a bug net to 'protect' them? Do they like being hugged by a wide hammock? Do they like open air?

Find out more about them, so that they really enjoy their first time.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

Slack Packhiker
03-03-2017, 22:12
An unexpected chance to try a regular sized Eno was my first GE experience. The WBBB is my hammock of choice, I hike with the 1.7 regular single layer and hang in that, plus the XL double layer 1.7, at home.

I've experimented with pads, then various TQ's and UQ's, but I love the WBBB's and really like the foot box and shelf. Can't justify other hammocks at this point in my gear gathering.

A hammock of the appropriate minimum length and hung optimally are the best selling points for a potential new hammocker, plus nice material. Instruction of how to actually lay in it matters too.

How cool to introduce someone to hanging and watch their face light up.

Dublinlin
03-04-2017, 00:22
I recommended a WBBB XLC to both of my friends who were brand new to the idea of hammock camping. One of the two bought a WBB XLC first thing. The other bought something else. Then we went camping together and the other friend only stayed in her non-WBBB XLC hammock one night before borrowing my spare XLC for the remainder of the trip. She ordered a WBBB XLC of her own the minute she got home.

BeechGirl
03-04-2017, 22:27
I would recommend a WBBB XLC as well. Love the ease of set up and the bug net, and the shelf. Also, love love love my wooki. I love the simplicity of the combo.

laracrofty
03-17-2017, 23:18
I am pretty new to hammock camping but I have a friend who wants to do it with her dog. I suggested a basic hammock and tarp, and she liked the idea of one of those bug nets with a floor. So far I am still in my starter eno, but every time I set it up I am more comfy in it :)

Sent from my Robin using Tapatalk

lilprincess
03-19-2017, 09:34
Caution with the dog. Don't let it in unless your ready to have it in all the time. They prefer a hammock to the ground too. Lol

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P-Dub
03-19-2017, 09:38
Caution with the dog. Don't let it in unless your ready to have it in all the time. They prefer a hammock to the ground too. Lol
Speaking from experience as reflected in your avatar?? :laugh:

lilprincess
03-19-2017, 09:45
Speaking from experience as reflected in your avatar?? [emoji23]
Oh yeah. He wouldn't sleep unless he was in with me. He kept me warm but his breath wasn't a plus. [emoji15] [emoji40]

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tollermama
03-19-2017, 21:21
I only have the WBBB to reference for a hammock, but I like it. It has good shelf storage and the footbox is handy. It is pretty big too. I did splurge for a Chameleon and once I get it I will be able to compare the hammocks and give you some ideas as the Chameleon has a different fabric entirely.

Anyone worried about the dog ripping the fabric of the hammock with their claws inadvertently? I would be worried to let Keji in with me just because of that, plus she is a bit of a bed hog. :rolleyes:

MoniqueWS
04-18-2017, 10:02
I made and use a double layer, 1.0 HyperD, gathered end, 11' hammock. I am 5'10" and 180#. It is the same thing I have made for my 13 year old son and now my 16 year old daughter. She is 5'9" and 135#. The double layer allows us to slip the ZRest pad (or other) in for a night of comfort and no slipping/squishing/sliding out from the pad.

I am a Boy Scout leader and a Venturing adult adviser. The Scouts are making double layer, ripstop, gathered end, 11' hammocks. All of the Venturers (half young women) are also making double layer, gathered end, 11' hammocks.

Mine is Fuchsia inside and Moroccan blue. Brother's is dark and light blue. Sister's is hot pink inside and donuts outside! Photo of her fabrics below (she is off in the world with her new hammock now so no photos yet):
148827

Cham102
04-24-2017, 07:21
I just made my own out of Hexon 1.0, 11 ft so my I can lay flatter with my womanly body. I made a video if you want to see what I did and why.


https://youtu.be/GCA8VbDs87I

Rosomane
05-07-2017, 21:25
Caution with the dog. Don't let it in unless your ready to have it in all the time. They prefer a hammock to the ground too. Lol

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

Ha ha, I've hung my hammock in my backyard a couple times and my girl dog jumps in and cuddles up. I wouldn't have expected that. My boy dog would make short work of any bug netting though, slash, slash. He likes luxury too.

Akela
08-24-2017, 20:45
HI,
i am a cold sleeper. Thinking to move into hammocking. I am looking at a 4 season, not too claustrophobic hammock instead of my tent. I like the Clark NX-270 as it looks like ti holds at low temp and if needed can be used as tent.
Any lady has experience with it? is it comfortable not just to sleep but to change clothes, etc

Dublinlin
08-24-2017, 22:27
Well, when I responded to this thread last March, my answer, hands down, was that you just can't beat a Warbonnet XLC single layer 1.7 for comfort. Still can't beat that, but I found something that definitely equals it and is less expensive...a single layer Hexon 1.6 Simply Light Design's Trail Lair! When it comes to choosing which hammock to take, the Trail Lair has been the one that's made it into my backpack my last three trips!

The Trail Lairs with their integrated bug net and zippered entry on either or both sides are definitely worth considering! Also, the turn around time on them is crazy fast for a custom made hammock...choose your options late tonight and put your order in and more than likely, Jared will have it in the mail to you tomorrow morning. No kidding! He sews all night when orders come in! And he's obviously a perfectionist. His hammocks are beautiful! And COMFORTABLE! And if you put one of Dutch's Peak Shelves in it, you have as much storage space as the Blackbird's shelf gives you! Sweet!

I love both the elegance of my Blackbird XLC and the clean, simple lines of my Trail Lair. Can't go wrong with either one!

amibrain
10-03-2017, 23:32
I haven't tried anything else, but I love the simple setup for the Hennessy Expedition Asym Classic. I needed easy. :) I am super comfortable in it and even slept on my side in it! My son can actually curl up in a ball in his and still be comfy. I wanted something with a bug net built in, and I love the snakeskins . . . it makes take down a breeze.

I may fall in love with another hammock someday, but for now this is the hammock for me + the one I'd recommend :)

ljane
10-04-2017, 08:34
When I was hoping to test the hammock camping waters as inexpensively as possible, I ended up with a 9-foot hammock with an integrated bug net. I figured I’d upgrade if necessary, but it’s been over a year and I’m still in the same rig. It probably doesn’t help that I’m REALLY picky and don’t want to end up with a pile of gear I don’t use. For context, I’m 5’2”, 120#, and can sleep in just about any position, so I can always find a good way to lay regardless of variable conditions (distance between trees, etc.). And I actually find the calf ridge to be a good place to rest my feet!

If I could find the perfect next hammock, these are the things I’m considering:

-definitely a gathered end. I laid in a bridge hammock, and while I wasn’t worried I was going to fall out, it did feel quite a bit more “twitchy” or reactive to any movement. Since there are people who swear by their bridge hammocks, I’m guessing this is something you adapt to pretty quickly.

-I love the Chameleon’s peak shelf and am planning to make something similar for my hammock. (You can also buy them on Dutch’s site.) I don’t have any experience with Warbonnet’s footbox but imagine it adds similar functionality. Storage is key in a gathered end hammock, since everything that isn’t neatly packed away somewhere slides down to the lowest point. (Thank goodness my kindle has a sturdy cover!)

-possibly longer, though only because people say longer is more comfortable, so I don’t know whether it would matter to me. I did sleep a couple nights in a Chameleon (11’) and felt suffocated by all the fabric. Since that could have to do with the cut, I’d want to try other longer (rectangular?) hammocks for a comparison. If I don’t need to add the extra weight I won’t.

-removable bug net. Mine is sewn in, and since I don’t generally use the spreader bars that came with it, I sometimes end up breathing in a mouthful of net. Plus it might be nice to see the stars more clearly.

-I like the idea of a solid over-cover for cooler weather, though I’ve been comfy in my current hammock down to high single digits with my 0 degree quilts.


I was looking seriously at something from Dream Hammock, but I haven’t determined for sure that I’m a left lay. The fact that you can switch the lay on the Chameleon was appealing (plus the removable bug net and over-cover), but after the experience noted above, it’s no longer in the running.

Laura

P-Dub
10-04-2017, 09:04
You might want to look at simplylightdesigns.com (http://www.simplylightdesigns.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/22_55/products_id/331)'s Trail Lair -- like the Chameleon, there is no dedicated lay.

tangara
10-04-2017, 09:16
... I actually find the calf ridge to be a good place to rest my feet!
If I could find the perfect next hammock, these are the things Iím considering:
-definitely a gathered end. ...
-I love the Chameleonís peak shelf ...
-possibly longer, though only because people say longer is more comfortable...
-removable bug net. ...
-I like the idea of a solid over-cover for cooler weather...
Laura

I've found plenty of uses for the calf ridge, too, if I happen to hang the hammock stupidly. Gathered end - yes - but I was introduced to hammocks with 13 foot cotton hammocks in the tropics, almost all over 60" wide. Fabric plays a big part in the comfort of the hammock. Fabric with a little bit of give will eliminate a lot of ridges, although some people like the fabrics that don't give at all. You just have to try to get somewhere where there are other hammocks to look at.

I recently gave in and made a nylon hammock 12 feet long, to approximate the 13 footers I had used at first, and honestly, I was disappointed. It was no more comfortable than any of the other lengths I have, although I only have one that is under 10 foot. I don't mind the extra fabric of the wider hammocks - it's a place I can rest an elbow or lean my head, or just wrap over me.

The sub 10-footer, that's a mosquito net hammock, and I rarely use it for the same reasons. I have a piece of bug net material that is long and wide enough for the hammock, and I just lay it over the ridgeline (a couple snaps on the ends to secure it) and I'm fine. But I'm not in Florida, either. Up here, mosquitoes bother us for a couple hours at night, or on a real humid day, then they go to bed.

I do the same thing as a winter over cover - a large piece of a little heavier nylon thrown over the ridgeline. You won't believe how much heat that helps retain and it doesn't weigh that much.

Hope you have a fun time figuring it all out.

Dublinlin
10-04-2017, 09:21
When I was hoping to test the hammock camping waters as inexpensively as possible, I ended up with a 9-foot hammock with an integrated bug net. I figured I’d upgrade if necessary, but it’s been over a year and I’m still in the same rig. It probably doesn’t help that I’m REALLY picky and don’t want to end up with a pile of gear I don’t use. For context, I’m 5’2”, 120#, and can sleep in just about any position, so I can always find a good way to lay regardless of variable conditions (distance between trees, etc.). And I actually find the calf ridge to be a good place to rest my feet!

If I could find the perfect next hammock, these are the things I’m considering:

-definitely a gathered end. I laid in a bridge hammock, and while I wasn’t worried I was going to fall out, it did feel quite a bit more “twitchy” or reactive to any movement. Since there are people who swear by their bridge hammocks, I’m guessing this is something you adapt to pretty quickly.

-I love the Chameleon’s peak shelf and am planning to make something similar for my hammock. (You can also buy them on Dutch’s site.) I don’t have any experience with Warbonnet’s footbox but imagine it adds similar functionality. Storage is key in a gathered end hammock, since everything that isn’t neatly packed away somewhere slides down to the lowest point. (Thank goodness my kindle has a sturdy cover!)

-possibly longer, though only because people say longer is more comfortable, so I don’t know whether it would matter to me. I did sleep a couple nights in a Chameleon (11’) and felt suffocated by all the fabric. Since that could have to do with the cut, I’d want to try other longer (rectangular?) hammocks for a comparison. If I don’t need to add the extra weight I won’t.

-removable bug net. Mine is sewn in, and since I don’t generally use the spreader bars that came with it, I sometimes end up breathing in a mouthful of net. Plus it might be nice to see the stars more clearly.

-I like the idea of a solid over-cover for cooler weather, though I’ve been comfy in my current hammock down to high single digits with my 0 degree quilts.


I was looking seriously at something from Dream Hammock, but I haven’t determined for sure that I’m a left lay. The fact that you can switch the lay on the Chameleon was appealing (plus the removable bug net and over-cover), but after the experience noted above, it’s no longer in the running.

Laura


My current favorite set up is Trail Lair hammock (from SLD) made out of Hexon 1.6 (perfect amount of stretch!). In the cold months I pair it with a Warbonnet Wooki XL (my favorite UQ) and tuck everything into a Warbonnet Winter Sock XL (which I prefer over my WBBB XLC winter top cover and over my DH Thunderbird winter over cover).

Vtmimib
10-08-2017, 07:25
I'm 5'2" 120lbs and I fit perfectly in my 10'5" Dutchware 1.0 hexon fabric, with built in ridgeline hammock. I have the bugnet that fits over the whole hammock with the drawstring on the bottom. I like being able to not bring the bugnet if I dont need it. If my trees are not perfectly spaced, and I get a calf ridge, I also use it as a foot rest, which is nice after a days worth of backpacking the steep trails of VT and NH. I like the fabric, because of how soft, sturdy, and silent it is. When I lay in my husband's 11' amamzon.com hammock, it is the excact opposite of my hammock: Fabric I can hear crinkle everytime I move, a zippered bug net, that tears super easy, and it's 2lbs heavier than mine.
So with complete bias, if I was going to reccomend a hammock to another female, (which I would love to find another lady friend who backpacks with a hammock), If she was my size I would reccomend a cottage vendor 10'5" hammock. If she was taller, a 11'. To both, I would reccomend a hammock with the ability to add on extras as she gets comfortable in hammock camping, and figures out what she likes and doesn't.
As for you ladies, what would you reccomend as a good 3 season tarp?

Dublinlin
10-08-2017, 08:36
As for you ladies, what would you reccomend as a good 3 season tarp?

If you are solo hiking camping or hiking camping with other women (so no need to have dressing room level privacy from your hammock) in 45 degree or above temps I'd recommend the Edge, MiniFly, or ThunderFly--all from Warbonnet. For hard-core winter camping or days on end of torrential rain, especially horizontally blowing rain, or snow, the SuperFly is awesome. I own both an Edge and a SuperFly from Warbonnet. I love both, but find on 99% of my trips I grab the Edge to throw in my pack rather than the SuperFly because it is smaller, lighter, and less enclosing. My dogs have a strong preference for the Edge since it doesn't obstruct their view out at night. Now if I'm camping when I know from the outset I'll be experiencing high winds, cold temperatures, heavy rains with high winds, or be in a mixed crowd where I'll want my tarp to provide plenty of privacy from all angles then I'm packing my SuperFly, hands down!

I've never tried the MiniFly or ThunderFly (they are newer to the market), but, just looking at them on line, I'd trade my Edge in a heartbeat for the MiniFly. The MiniFly is very similar to the Edge except it has a bit of extra coverage over each end. I've used my Edge tarp in at least six true gully-washer storms as well as numerous average rains and my 11' hammock has never gotten the least bit damp. I am careful to set it up strategically though as there certainly isn't as much room for error with the more minimalist Edge that there would be with a larger tarp like the SuperFly...and I always drape my rain poncho over the most windward end of of the Edge at night if I'm worried it might rain, to close that end off kind of door-like, like the SuperFly's design. But that probably isn't necessary...when I'm out exploring in the rain during the daylight hours wearing my rain poncho, the exposed ends of the Edge have never let my hammock get damp, so, doubt I need worry at night either, but I sleep better with that added bit of insurance. Of course that ties up my rain poncho all night, whereas if I had the MiniFly, the tarp would cover over its own ends just that little bit extra so that I'd feel secure not draping my poncho over it!

Vtmimib
10-09-2017, 09:54
Dublinlin, I just started using my FrogTogs rain poncho as a sort of "summer sheet" to collect condensation when summer, early fall backpacking. I just recently heard about summer and winter socks, and I wonder if that is what they do. I have also used it as a door on one end of my tarp, to keep the wind/rain out, when my tree selection was minimal, and the wind was blowing rain through my hammock. My poncho is easily part of my hammock system, as it is my outerwear system. I'll look into those flys. I have never found privacy to be an issue backpacking, wind, rain, and weight, are more my concerns. I'm looking to go backpacking in November, which I have not done before, but know from backpacking in October, the tarp I have right now, would almost work, but I would like more coverage. I am long term borrowing a eno-dry fly. Thanks for the info.

Barbi520
10-20-2017, 22:06
I have the Wilderness Logics Lite Owl. It is an 11 ft double layer, beautiful workmanship. It has the knotty mods which I love. They give you like a foot box and head box and give a nice flat lay. With the Lite Owl, if you want to change from right to left lay, you can just flip hammock over and the foot boxes reverse. I am 5'2" 125 lbs, but the 11 ft is very comfortable. Mine is permanently set up in the house, but we have insufficient space outside to hang it. We have a Hennessy on the patio, but don't care for the integrated bug net. Thnks to the ladies on the forum, I was introduced to Simply Light design. Just ordered a 10 ft Tree Runner DL with cinch buckle suspension. love whoopie slings, but you need more space between posts or trees when you use whoopies. Really a lot of great information on this thread. Thnks.

MuleTeam
11-08-2017, 21:08
Ok so I have a hammock obsession so I would gladly let her borrow on of mine.��
If she needs not to drop a lot of $$, I would recommend one of Dutch's netless. And as some of you have mentioned, if she can sew there is definitely something very satisfying in a hammock you have built yourself.

If $ is not too much of an obstacle, my runner up suggestion is the WBBB. You really can't go wrong with this hammock. I thought it would be my favorite forever until......

The Chameleon!
Rig this hammock out and you have the most versatile and comfortable hammock made.

( I use my hammock mainly for backpacking so car campers and every nighters may have other needs)

Barbi520
11-19-2017, 13:42
10 foot DL Tree Runner with Left lay Knotty Mods and cinch buckle suspension is just fabulous. Maybe even more comfortable than the lite Owl. Love the Lite Owl but 11 ft is a lot of hammock to get hung properly. Also I am only 5 '2" and seem maybe a little more comfortable in the Tree Runner.

LadyFaile
11-19-2017, 20:43
My first hammock was a Ticket To The Moon Double Hammock. It's my only camping hammock so far, and I love it. The pricing was decent and I got to pick the colors, instead of being stuck with colors that were more geared toward guys. It's just a basic 10'6" gathered end hammock, which allowed me to pick and choose my accessories. That way I can pack just what I need. I also love that I could get a small child's hammock from them in matching colors to hold my gear next to or under me. That easy access makes it easier getting dressed and undressed without the need to get out of my hammock.

For warmth I went with an underquilt from LocoLibreGear because it was one of the few I found that had a synthetic fill option, as I suspect I may be allergic to down and didn't want to chance it. Bonus was that I got to pick coordinating colors to go with my hammock. This worked great with my sleeping bag as a top quilt, but I'm really looking forward to using my new top quilt which is also from LocoLibreGear. I had to wait awhile for both, but it was well worth it!

Pineglow
07-24-2018, 22:08
HI,
i am a cold sleeper. Thinking to move into hammocking. I am looking at a 4 season, not too claustrophobic hammock instead of my tent. I like the Clark NX-270 as it looks like ti holds at low temp and if needed can be used as tent.
Any lady has experience with it? is it comfortable not just to sleep but to change clothes, etc

Hi Akela! I realize it's been 11 months, so this may no longer be relevant. I've had an NX-250 for about 5 years now (the precursor to the -270). It does indeed stay warm, although I wouldn't recommend depending solely on the gear pockets for your insulation beneath. The poles keep the netting nicely off your face, although I'm sure a ridgeline would do just as well. I've never had to go to ground, but I imagine it would be about the same as a bivy bag. If you could change clothes in a bivy bag, you could do it in a Clark.

I'm actually thinking about trying for a longer hammock, though. (For reference, I'm 5'7" and around 350 lbs.) I don't have any calf ridge that bothers me, but I can't seem to lie diagonally enough to get a nice, flat bed. I have to put a coat or rolled up clothes under my knees to avoid hyperextending them overnight, and I get pressure pains in my heels where they press against the side of the hammock. I believe the NX-250 is around 9' long, so hopefully something longer would be better, or maybe something with a dedicated footbox.

sueb2b
02-15-2019, 22:04
I've got a WBBB double layer. That was my first. I have a couple other gathered-end hammocks, no ridgelines...don't really like sleeping in them as much as I enjoy the BB.

Looking at getting a new hammock. Probably single layer. Haven't fully decided yet. But I want both a bug net and an overcover for the next purchase.