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Catavarie
07-31-2011, 04:40
Okay, I'm the ultra hammock noob. I just joined the Hammock Forum and don't know quite the best place to ask this question. Saw this site and thought it would probably do. Is there a rule about how long your hammock should be in relation to your height?:confused:

From what I've read the minimum is your height plus 4ft. I'm 5'8" and made mine 10'6" after seams and hemming. Gives me a huge sweet spot to get into, although can be a little tight trying to hang in some places. :cool:

PropellerHead
08-04-2011, 00:35
In hopes of providing some useful information...

It occurred to me that when whipping the end of the hammock I had been either folding the material in the middle then gathering, or using a "W" fold then gathering. The one thing both of these have in common is at least one fold before the gathering.

After this little epiphany, I re-whipped the hammock ends with a slightly different process. I used a 3" "wwwwww" type fold to gather the end of the hammock up. Then I started at the right side and started pulling each fold out as I worked to the left creating an angled end before whipping it. Then I turned the hammock around and repeated the process. This is similar to cutting the ends on a diagonal creating an asymmetrical lay.

The effect that this has on the hammock is to create a much wider ridge that is much less pronounced that it was with a fold or simple "W" whipped end.

If you're experimenting with a whipped end hammock and haven't found a comfortable set up yet, give this a try and see if it is comfortable for you.

Mike

olddog
08-04-2011, 09:54
Thanks for the info Mike. I have been a big experimenter with folds and have tried your fold but without easing the end outward as working across the fabric. With the fabric in my house hammock I have been able to work folds without whipping. The muletape larkshead has enough grip to not slip, my new hiking hammock w/ amsteel is too slick and will need to be whipped or channeled. How much did you pull the starting fold out and how much each following fold? At this time the fold on the house hammock is pleated on each edge with 2" folds for 12" from each side with a single fold in the center. Maybe wwVww. Going to go move the outer pleats outward to see how that works.

MAD777
08-04-2011, 12:14
That's good info PropellerHead! I've been trying out end treatments to flatten that hump but with symmetrical hammocks. The jury is still out.

I have decided for me personally, that I don't like asymmetrical hammocks because I sleep only on my side and also toss & turn. The asymmetrical hammocks limit my comfort to one position.

hrairoorah
08-04-2011, 14:32
You guys are in trouble now! You've created a monster.

Just finished my first gathered end hammock. Next is the stretch-side mod. Then a ridgeline storage pouch, and a pouch for the end of the hammock( I put a loop with a lanyard knot into the center of the gathered end. The loop hangs down into the hammock so I can hang a bag. I put one in each end.) and a new stuff sack and......

I find myself checking email anticipating a new coupon from Jo Ann's. I am drooling over a new pair of Fiskar's scissors. I now boldly stride into the fabric department as if I belong.

Just look at what you have done to me!!!:tongueup:

http://img585.imageshack.us/img585/4985/0804111506.jpg

Knotty
08-04-2011, 17:16
No stopping you now! Way to go!

MAD777
08-04-2011, 20:12
hrairoorah, it looks like you've jump off the deep end! Welcome to the water :)

AppalachianHammock
08-04-2011, 20:30
I dont have a problem. What, those 5 hammocks over there????? I need those all for ummm......ummmm.......
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Stuff............

Stormstaff
08-06-2011, 07:37
I need to read through this thread to make sure there are no major updates I should know about but I'd love to try to do something like this for my 10 yr old.

Knotty
08-06-2011, 17:12
I need to read through this thread to make sure there are no major updates I should know about but I'd love to try to do something like this for my 10 yr old.

Lots of good info spread throughout the many pages of this thread. That said, the original post pretty much provides everything you need to make your first hammock.

I was caught in analysis paralysis for a long time, which is why I started this thread. Trying to share that it can be very simple.

olddog
08-06-2011, 22:01
Ya did good Knotty!

Knotty
08-06-2011, 23:56
Thanks olddog.

Stormstaff
08-08-2011, 05:40
Thank you sir!


Lots of good info spread throughout the many pages of this thread. That said, the original post pretty much provides everything you need to make your first hammock.

I was caught in analysis paralysis for a long time, which is why I started this thread. Trying to share that it can be very simple.

olddog
08-08-2011, 21:59
Just ripped out GvilleDave's second gather and sewed in the third style. Initial impression is that I like the third. Going to play with it a little more. Then try Aardvark's double convex. **** fall is right around the corner, new tarp needs sil treatment, need Pip's TED bug net made and here i am playing with my hammock. Here it is time to hit the hammock.

monk
09-13-2011, 19:33
1.9oz. It's 70 denier. Their "Sport ripstop" is type 6.6 nylon (better than type 6). Always use the 40-50% coupon when buying from them.

HI KNOTTY WELL TO THE POST ABOVE I LIKE THERE SITE AND ASKED A GOOD FRIEND TO GO TO THE THAT KNOWS FABRICS AND I HAVE A QUESTION FOR YOU? IS 30D SILNYLON A GOOD FOR MAKEING THIS HAMMOCK? OR LIKE I READ THE INTIRE POSTING ANY OLD STRONG FABRIC, IF SO SHE WHATS TO SEE IF COULD MAKE ONE WITH YOUR IDEA? I KNOW ITS PRICEY BUT IF IM NOT PAYING FOR IT (WTH) RIGHT! SHE'S WANTED TO MAKE A HAMMOCK FOR ME AND SOMEONE ELSE AND I ASKED IF SHE MIGHT COULD MAKE A TARP OUT OF THIS FABRIC WITH SOME HELP.

samsteeley
09-20-2011, 10:19
Great instructions. I am going to take the plunge and make a hammock. (currently using an ENO doublenest, with a patched hole in it).


I am 6'-2" and currently weigh 250lbs but recently been as high as 275lbs.
I would like to make a fairly lightweight hammock with no frills such as insulation pockets, gear pockets, etc... (at least for now anyway)

I would like to hang my new hammock with a structural ridgeline, any special design considerations I need to take into account?

What material do you recommend for the hammock body?
What material do you recommend for structural ridge line?


As a newbie (to both hammocking and DIY hammock making) any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Sam

Knotty
09-21-2011, 19:35
HI KNOTTY WELL TO THE POST ABOVE I LIKE THERE SITE AND ASKED A GOOD FRIEND TO GO TO THE THAT KNOWS FABRICS AND I HAVE A QUESTION FOR YOU? IS 30D SILNYLON A GOOD FOR MAKEING THIS HAMMOCK? OR LIKE I READ THE INTIRE POSTING ANY OLD STRONG FABRIC, IF SO SHE WHATS TO SEE IF COULD MAKE ONE WITH YOUR IDEA? I KNOW ITS PRICEY BUT IF IM NOT PAYING FOR IT (WTH) RIGHT! SHE'S WANTED TO MAKE A HAMMOCK FOR ME AND SOMEONE ELSE AND I ASKED IF SHE MIGHT COULD MAKE A TARP OUT OF THIS FABRIC WITH SOME HELP.

Monk - I'd avoid sil because it doesn't breath. Too much potential for ending up in a sweat filled hammock. 1.1oz ripstop (30D?) will hold my weight, 185lbs, but it makes me nervous so I don't use my 1.1 hammock anymore (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=31357). My preference is 1.9oz (70D?),


Great instructions. I am going to take the plunge and make a hammock. (currently using an ENO doublenest, with a patched hole in it).


I am 6'-2" and currently weigh 250lbs but recently been as high as 275lbs.
I would like to make a fairly lightweight hammock with no frills such as insulation pockets, gear pockets, etc... (at least for now anyway)

I would like to hang my new hammock with a structural ridgeline, any special design considerations I need to take into account?

What material do you recommend for the hammock body?
What material do you recommend for structural ridge line?


As a newbie (to both hammocking and DIY hammock making) any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Sam

Sam - I'm not totally sure but believe 1.9oz ripstop should work for your weight. The structural ridgeline can be made from 7/64" Amsteel Blue or even 550 paracord but the paracord will have some stretch, but that's not overly critical in an SRL. No special considerations are needed to include an SRL in terms of how you sew and gather the hammock ends if you follow the instructions at the beginning of this thread.

Good luck to both of you.

FireInMyBones
09-28-2011, 06:25
If I wanted to modify this into a more asymmetrical design like pictured below, do you feel it would still work well and be safe? There is a lot of fabric on the sides when I lay diagonal. I would like to be able to see what is being blocked by the "wall" of fabric.

Knotty
09-28-2011, 13:34
My thinking is you can cut the material with the offsets shown but ultimately the two suspended ends of the hammock will still align with each other, possibly introducing some localized loads in the material. Best way to test the idea is to make one and test it in a safe way.

FireInMyBones
09-28-2011, 13:52
I made a small one (pictured below) with the same dimensions (scaled down of course). It does not seem to have any issues with weight dispersal. I may give it a try on my DIY gathered end.

You can see there are some lead shot filled weights from scuba diving in there (10lbs).

monk
09-30-2011, 18:34
Knotty,Thanks for the advice about the fab. I will find some fabric with that rateing. I did try my hand at the monster of the sewing machine. then try to figure out how to rig a rige line and bug screen.

dimeotane
10-09-2011, 21:20
Thanks Knotty for posting your tutorial for us noobs to follow. I now own my first hammock ever and I made it!

Following your tutorial was really easy. It took an hour or two on the sewing machine to do. Really wasn't hard at all to make! I can see myself making another one at some point it was so worth it, and so easy.

I've been interested in getting a hammock for some time, and then had discovered at work in the scrap cloth box about 20ft x 10 ft of nylon cloth. I folded the width in half so it was double layer for extra strength, and cut the length down to about 11ft. Being old cloth, there was a couple small wear marks in the cloth that I fixed with some crazy glue to prevent them from fraying any further. It did the trick nicely.

For my webbing I got a 3 pack of wratchet ties downs from Home Depot for $10. 1" by 10 ft. 1200# rating. That's all I needed to get my hammock up and hanging! I happened to have two trees in the back yard a perfect distance apart for hanging.

Talk about your cheap noob setup! $10, scrap cloth, and a couple hours!

As soon as I kicked back in it on a test run I was amazed how comfortable it was. I was lucky enough to enjoy spending the better part of the evening relaxing in it! I'm officially hooked on hanging! :boggle:

I think my next step is to figure out some bug mesh and a tarp.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-zkWCDrKo4lM/TpJVQJI1VCI/AAAAAAAAAcc/aX3WE6Uym04/s512/IMAG0441.jpg

Knotty
10-09-2011, 22:37
Glad you took on the hammock project Dimeotane. There are a few detached bug net instructions on the forum. Here's mine. hope you find it helpful.
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=36328

MrClockWork
10-26-2011, 14:11
I have watched a few DIY gathered end hammock videos and I was just wondering if there is a benefit to making a curved pattern for the hammock body? If so, is it worth the trouble? If a rectangel pattern works just fine then count me in :)

Fronkey
10-26-2011, 14:30
I have watched a few DIY gathered end hammock videos and I was just wondering if there is a benefit to making a curved pattern for the hammock body? If so, is it worth the trouble? If a rectangel pattern works just fine then count me in :)

I have a rectangle and it works fantastic for me! :)

Fronkey

Knotty
10-26-2011, 17:00
MrCW - I've stayed away from curved hammock ends because they're usually designed to increase the tension along the hammock's sides but you pay a price in terms of the ability to sit on the edge of the hammock. The extra tension can be uncomfortable on the legs and there's increased chance of tearing out a seam. Still each has to choose what they want vs. what they have to give up.

My solution to the hammock side tension is the Stretch-Side Hammock (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=40959), a variant on the standard gathered end.

HappyHiker
10-27-2011, 02:00
Heres my DL made from the DIYGS plan (http://www.diygearsupply.com/diy_gui...%20Hammock.jpg )using the Knotty guide for the gathered ends:

http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=1585&pictureid=11614

This was an amazingly easy project, took about 4 hours total for me to complete (hammock only, the whoopie slings and soft shackles took another 2 hours).

Special thanks to Knotty, sclittlefield and Opie for such great guides!

Knotty
10-27-2011, 11:41
HappyHiker - Congrats on the DIY hammock. Even going with the double layer version you comment on how easy it was. So true.

If anyone out there is hesitant to try making their own hammock, stop thinking about it and just do it. :)

Kodiak1
11-08-2011, 16:24
Thanks Knotty,Great Video think I'll give this a try.

Chrisman2013
11-28-2011, 20:26
Thanks for the great instructions! I'd always wanted to get into DIY Gear and this was my first attempt. I followed your instructions and made the hammock out of 1.5ounce ripstop. I also used your Stretch-Side idea. Coupled with some DIY Whoopies I made this thing is awesome... but very easy.

Knotty
11-28-2011, 23:20
"Awesome" and "easy". That's what I like to hear!

jbphilly
11-28-2011, 23:29
I just made a gathered end hammock yesterday and tested it today. Success! My seams were pretty darn sloppy in places, but hey, it's a first effort. Also, the box stitches I put in the webbing held up too!

joemcc
02-02-2012, 12:25
I didn't used the channel end design for mine. I got my instructions from just jeffs and folded it in half, squeezed it together and pulled the ends a little further before whipping. I used it for awhole but just rewhipped it. This time I just bundled it all. The first method made the edges real taught and closed over me. Haven't tried the new way yet due to rain but it looks looser.

gmcttr
02-02-2012, 12:48
...The first method made the edges real taught and closed over me. Haven't tried the new way yet due to rain but it looks looser.

You pulled the corners out too much. I usually just pull the corners on the head side an inch or two at both ends.

It's not unusual for me to whip and re-whip a new hammock a dozen times or more to get the lay just right.

How the ends are folded/gathered doesn't make near as much difference as how the corners are pulled.

WV
02-02-2012, 13:44
I didn't used the channel end design for mine. I got my instructions from just jeffs and folded it in half, squeezed it together and pulled the ends a little further before whipping. I used it for awhole but just rewhipped it. This time I just bundled it all. The first method made the edges real taut and closed over me. Haven't tried the new way yet due to rain but it looks looser.

Adding the bungee to the sides is another (better?) way of compensating for the floppy edges. You shouldn't need to pull the corners out much, if at all.

joemcc
02-02-2012, 13:58
I didn't think I pulled the corners much but maybe I did at both ends making it super tight. The rain paused and I got in it...scary! Now its kinda loose I'm scared to fall out lol.

gmcttr
02-02-2012, 15:45
Adding the bungee to the sides is another (better?) way of compensating for the floppy edges. You shouldn't need to pull the corners out much, if at all.

FWIW...I don't pull the corners to attempt to get rid of a floppy edge.

On the wide hammocks I have made, when laying on the diagonal, I often find that my head "rolls off the edge" of the fabric held taught by body weight, into a pocket of the remaining fabric toward the edge. Careful "tuning" by pulling a corner cures this and allows for an increased diagonal lay.

Maybe it's just the dynamics of my body shape on the width hammocks I make, but that's the way it works for me.

michi
02-29-2012, 14:22
Just wanted to throw out a quick thanks to Knotty for this instructional. Simple, clear instructions that helped me through my first 3 DIY hammocks.

Boothill
02-29-2012, 14:36
have never made myself a hammock before and started looking at this thread this morning

had 10 yard of 1.9oz black ripstop sitting around and thought i should maybe try making one

an hour and a half later not only had i made one but two, got the ridgelines done too, just gotta whip up a couple sets of whoopies and it a done deal

don't know why i thought making a simple hammock would be harder than it really is......there's absolutely nothing to it, if i had more fabric i probably would of made a few more

thanks Knotty :)

boot

Knotty
02-29-2012, 23:08
Just wanted to throw out a quick thanks to Knotty for this instructional. Simple, clear instructions that helped me through my first 3 DIY hammocks.

If you're interested in making more, I highly recommend the Stretch-Side Hammock. See signature for link.


have never made myself a hammock before and started looking at this thread this morning

had 10 yard of 1.9oz black ripstop sitting around and thought i should maybe try making one

an hour and a half later not only had i made one but two, got the ridgelines done too, just gotta whip up a couple sets of whoopies and it a done deal

don't know why i thought making a simple hammock would be harder than it really is......there's absolutely nothing to it, if i had more fabric i probably would of made a few more

thanks Knotty :)

boot

Exactly why I posted the instructions after making my first one. Wanted people to realize it's easy. Just have to take the plunge.

Also, you're both welcome.

Statesfadeaway
03-05-2012, 23:27
I actually cut my raw fabric on one end on a diagonal. This creates for me an area that my feet fall into for a flatter lay. It's my way of not having to whip and rewip the end to create that sweet spot.

Knotty
03-05-2012, 23:57
Excellent. What was the difference in length between the sides?

matmore74
04-03-2012, 12:41
Nothing new here but thought some might find it useful to see step by step pictures on how to make a gathered end hammock. Use 3-4 yards of material, depending on how tall you are. I'm 6'2" and started with 11'6" of 1.9oz ripstop from Speer.

The whipping method comes from the Warbonnet hammocks and I learned it from others on the forum. I've changed the ridgeline a bit. On a Warbonnet it runs thru the whipped hammock ends. I wanted the ridgeline to be removable so I could play with different lengths. Mine is just a line of 2.2mm Zing-It (or is it Lash-It?) with eye splices at each end thru which the suspension gets run. Suspension is 7/64" Amsteel Blue.

Pics:
http://picasaweb.google.com/ron.mehringer/GatheredEndHammock?authkey=Gv1sRgCKzqwe2qr--TEQ&feat=directlink

Video:
ZSbnQs-2y8c


I have tried it this way and I like it the best and it looks nicer. Go with it. Oh, when putting a webbing in to hold up the new hammock use a large piece of pipe and gather it up that way and slid the webbing down it pull the pipe out and then just pull it togther and us a beaner for it and done.

Knotty
04-04-2012, 22:30
matmore74, if you're going to use a suspension through the end channel approach, then you need to modify the build instructions. My instructions create a knob of material at the ends and all that material takes your weight, so the end channel sewing isn't critical. When doing what you're suggesting you need to beef up the stitching with additional rows. Poorly constructed end channels have failed.

mountain_man_mike
04-05-2012, 13:38
Kudos to Knotty for the detailed instructions and follow up with those asking questions. Ron, you are a real tribute to the type of members here. Major props to you.

dragon360
04-05-2012, 14:03
Great instructions - I have made three (1 with the stretch sides) for a friend and his kids!

Rampant
04-17-2012, 00:09
Quick question: If I wanted to run my suspension through my end channels (ENO style), how much seam allowance do you think I should leave on each end to triple stitch it and be able to run my suspension through?

gmcttr
04-17-2012, 07:01
Quick question: If I wanted to run my suspension through my end channels (ENO style), how much seam allowance do you think I should leave on each end to triple stitch it and be able to run my suspension through?

I leave a 4 1/2" seam allowance. I fold over 3" and then fold another 1 1/2" leaving a 1 1/2" hem with the fabric doubled up for stress and wear.

TheCoyote
04-18-2012, 17:55
Nothing new here but thought some might find it useful to see step by step pictures on how to make a gathered end hammock. Use 3-4 yards of material, depending on how tall you are. I'm 6'2" and started with 11'6" of 1.9oz ripstop from Speer.

The whipping method comes from the Warbonnet hammocks and I learned it from others on the forum. I've changed the ridgeline a bit. On a Warbonnet it runs thru the whipped hammock ends. I wanted the ridgeline to be removable so I could play with different lengths. Mine is just a line of 2.2mm Zing-It (or is it Lash-It?) with eye splices at each end thru which the suspension gets run. Suspension is 7/64" Amsteel Blue.

Pics:
http://picasaweb.google.com/ron.mehringer/GatheredEndHammock?authkey=Gv1sRgCKzqwe2qr--TEQ&feat=directlink


Video:
ZSbnQs-2y8c

Im 5' 8" and like a bit of extra room. Would 4 yards be too much? I want to make my own like the one you show for winter and use my WBBB for all other seasons. Also I want to make my own summer tarp.

gmcttr
04-18-2012, 22:06
Im 5' 8" and like a bit of extra room. Would 4 yards be too much? I want to make my own like the one you show for winter and use my WBBB for all other seasons. Also I want to make my own summer tarp.

I am also 5'-8" and find an 11' finished length is great. I don't feel that additional length adds much comfort for me, but does become too long to work well with some of the "standard" length tarps, bug nets, etc.

seadad9903
04-20-2012, 23:11
I'm 5'10", and made a gathered end out of 12' of ripstop. At the moment the ridgeline is 116". I am still playing with RL length, but 110"-116" gets me an almost perfectly flat lay.

It's all personal preference. My last DIY was 10' with a 108" RL, and I also have a HH Explorer (just about the same dimensions). Both are comfortable, only problems I had involved CBS, but not as nice as the 12' monster.

Try different sizes, find what you like

Catavarie
04-21-2012, 02:04
I suggest that if you want to try differnt length hammocks to make one at the longest length you want to try and to decrease the size tie a knot in the end of the hammock and larks head behind the knot. This will let you try out different lengths before you cut the fabric too short. :shades:

ouachita hiker
05-12-2012, 08:35
I have two DIY hammocks that a friend, preacha man, made for my grand kids several years ago. I, actually the wife, just modified them to be gathered in hammocks.. Much improved! Next project will be the stretch side hammock mod.

medicineman03
05-25-2012, 10:27
Nice instructional thread. Due to my limitations in sewing, I deciding whipping the ends was for me. I also went with the adjustable ridgeline, and 1.1 ripstop. I love how easy they are to make. I've already made two and I'm sure many more to follow. Here are some pics...
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14788
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14787
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14786
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14785
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14789
http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/picture.php?albumid=2043&pictureid=14784

gmcttr
05-25-2012, 11:10
Nice work. I strongly recommend you rotate the "tree straps" around to the inner face of the handrails so the straps come straight out of the Dutch Clips instead of folding back over them. Think of the difference in trying to tear a piece of paper by pulling on both ends or folding it over a sharp edge and tearing. You'll save a lot of wear and tear on the straps and an eventual quick trip to the ground for you.

Boots13
05-31-2012, 23:15
Did you use a single layer of 1.1?

medicineman03
06-01-2012, 17:50
Did you use a single layer of 1.1?

Yeah, just 1 layer of 1.1

flashbang009
06-09-2012, 19:25
I recently made one of these with the 1.1 from the group buy. Whipping the ends this way was difficult because the material wouldn't stay "balled up" and the whipping ended up slipping during my initial attempt. I finally got it working and used for a couple of nights until it slipped and released. Any fix for this? I'm thinking of going back to a continuous loop and carabiner to make things easier to attach.

Boots13
06-09-2012, 21:08
After you pull the draw cord try rolling it over back onto itself and then tie it, that'll give you a bigger bunch of material and shouldn't slip

Knotty
06-10-2012, 22:53
I recently made one of these with the 1.1 from the group buy. Whipping the ends this way was difficult because the material wouldn't stay "balled up" and the whipping ended up slipping during my initial attempt. I finally got it working and used for a couple of nights until it slipped and released. Any fix for this? I'm thinking of going back to a continuous loop and carabiner to make things easier to attach.

Are you referencing the method shown in my instructions, which is the Warbonnet method, or some other whipping method? It's hard to imagine the ball created with the Warbonnet method not staying put no matter how fine the fabric. That's the beauty of it. Other methods allow you to make more adjustments to the shape of the hammock but are trickier to work with.

This message thead has gotten so long that it's not always clear if people are talking about the original instructions or other techniques. I'd like to encourage everyone to use this thread to discuss just the original instructions and slight variations to avoid confusion.

flashbang009
06-11-2012, 00:38
Are you referencing the method shown in my instructions, which is the Warbonnet method, or some other whipping method? It's hard to imagine the ball created with the Warbonnet method not staying put no matter how fine the fabric. That's the beauty of it. Other methods allow you to make more adjustments to the shape of the hammock but are trickier to work with.

This message thead has gotten so long that it's not always clear if people are talking about the original instructions or other techniques. I'd like to encourage everyone to use this thread to discuss just the original instructions and slight variations to avoid confusion.

I was referencing the original method you had posted. When viewing the video and seeing others completed hammocks I think the same thing: there's no way that could slip with the material contained the way it is by the knot. However, when I tried it with the 1.1, it was very slippery and I couldn't get it to hold well. One question that may help my issue though: Is it ok to use 7/64" Amsteel for the whipping? That's what I used on my ends.

Funkyleebasick
06-11-2012, 22:31
nice thank you

Knotty
06-12-2012, 21:08
Well flashbang009, you've got me stumped. :confused:

It really shouldn't matter what type of rope or string you use to create the "knob". It's the bulk of fabric that keeps the suspension from slipping off the end, not the rope in the channel used to create the knob. You could use a thin string and it still would work. I've made 1.1 oz hammocks and the knob is still bulky enough.

Hope you get it figured out.

flashbang009
06-13-2012, 09:53
Well flashbang009, you've got me stumped. :confused:

It really shouldn't matter what type of rope or string you use to create the "knob". It's the bulk of fabric that keeps the suspension from slipping off the end, not the rope in the channel used to create the knob. You could use a thin string and it still would work. I've made 1.1 oz hammocks and the knob is still bulky enough.

Hope you get it figured out.

I ended up taking someone's advice a few posts up and flipping the knob down before whipping around the hammock and it seems to have worked great. Haven't hung it up yet but already looks much better. I think the first step of crossing and then wrapping around the hammock body wasn't working with the material for some reason..

Knotty
06-13-2012, 21:41
I've never tried flipping the knob down. I hope it works well for you but my concern would be that it could simply flip back up unexpectedly when the suspension line pulls on it.

The reason the knob should work with any fabric is because the rolled hem is three layers thick while the hammock body is only one layer. So whatever the fabric, the knob is at least three times bulkier than where the suspension attaches just below it.

hppyfngy
06-13-2012, 21:48
Knotty, I just have to say Bless Your Pointed Head for being so diligent and keeping up with all these threads you have so graciously started and/or contributed to.

You are surely the man. :thumbup:

Cheers,
HFG

MAD777
06-13-2012, 21:56
Agree! - 3 cheers for Knotty! Hip-hip-hooray!

Knotty
06-14-2012, 23:16
Thanks guys. I've been busy with a new job, so haven't had time to follow much of what's happening on the forum but I do try to keep up with this one.

Boon Booni
06-17-2012, 16:59
Thanks Knotty. As a new to hammocking guy, I've made 2 hammocks using your method. They've been great! I appreciate all the DIY stuff this forum puts forth.

hppyfngy
06-17-2012, 18:01
Thanks Knotty. As a new to hammocking guy, I've made 2 hammocks using your method. They've been great! I appreciate all the DIY stuff this forum puts forth.

Hey Boon Booni. We've never met but I know your handle from ADV :shades:

mountain_man_mike
06-18-2012, 18:41
Thanks Knotty. As a new to hammocking guy, I've made 2 hammocks using your method. They've been great! I appreciate all the DIY stuff this forum puts forth.

+100 to that one! Ron is so incredibly helpful. I made another hammock last month (1.9 oz. ripstop) and used it last week at session #1 BSA camp (Chawanakee). It worked just fine with no unexpected plops or drops. I used a thin cord similar to trip teeze as a structural ridgeline using the make a stopper knot on both sides then gather & whip between the knots method. I also installed a couple of Knotty leg tensioners using a grommet instead of stitching a button hole. They function, but I am still getting the hang of adjusting them. Overall weight for the hammock, suspension and stuff sack is 12 oz. Instead of taking a bunch of photos I decided to work on my napping merit badge.

Knotty, I was curious if it's reasonable to stitch a pleat along the edge where the tensioners go as a means of trimming an ounce or two and having the tension preset. Naturally, the adjustability goes out the window but maybe a preset tension works?

Knotty
06-19-2012, 22:51
A pleat could work but put it only on one side because you'd risk tearing the stitching as you entered/exited the hammock on that side.

mountain_man_mike
06-22-2012, 20:22
A pleat could work but put it only on one side because you'd risk tearing the stitching as you entered/exited the hammock on that side.

Thanks Ron. I appreciate the tip, which probably saved me at least one embarrasing moment. Good luck on the new job too.

ricksrover2
07-02-2012, 18:52
what is the best way to attach a ridge line to this whipping ? and what would be the best material to do this with?

MrClean417
07-02-2012, 20:55
Amsteel Whoopie Sling

OR, you could do something like Professor Hammok (Grizz) does

2sUfGqudl_8

valleyrat
07-24-2012, 06:00
o.k. i have one of the crinkel taffata teblecloth's at 90 x 156. so if i use this method to tie the ends, how long do i make my ridgeline? 83% of 156? or 83% of 150? thats gonna be 130 or 124? also can i use 1 inch web strapping for the suspension?

Knotty
07-24-2012, 12:06
Since the ridgeline only "knows" the finished length of the hammock, use 83% of 150". You could even argue that it should be slightly less, since there's some loss of hammock length to the gathered knobs on the ends.

Web suspension is fine.

valleyrat
07-24-2012, 12:10
Since the ridgeline only "knows" the finished length of the hammock, use 83% of 150". You could even argue that it should be slightly less, since there's some loss of hammock length to the gathered knobs on the ends.

Web suspension is fine.

thanks knotty, i need all the help i can get. cuz i havent spent 5 mins in a hammock yet.thats why i have questions all over this sight.

Knotty
07-24-2012, 22:17
No problem. Just be aware that a 150x90 inch hammock is HUGE.

Great for lounging around but not what you'd want to use for camping. Just think of how big your tarp would need to be.

valleyrat
07-25-2012, 01:10
No problem. Just be aware that a 150x90 inch hammock is HUGE.

Great for lounging around but not what you'd want to use for camping. Just think of how big your tarp would need to be.

im starting to find this out,just got the fabric to do a diy bug net for it and omg thats a lot of sewing by hand. gonna take me a while to do all that. im thinking about just buying a tarp, maybe a kelty, or a chnook, or a guide gear, or somthing . dont know yet

FightingTheTide
08-03-2012, 09:48
Right now I've got my whoopie slings running through my end channel with a larks head. I had my first overnight in my setup last night, and I found I need more lower/mid back support, as well as knee support. I'm a side sleeper predominantly. Any advice or tips on how I can modify my hammock for more comfort? Would making a gathered end hammock this way make a difference in the way my hammock supports me as I lay in it?

MAD777
08-03-2012, 09:54
I found I need more lower/mid back support, as well as knee support. I'm a side sleeper predominantly. Any advice or tips on how I can modify my hammock for more comfort?

Try pulling your suspension tighter which will require a longer ridgeline, if you have one.

FightingTheTide
08-03-2012, 10:02
Try pulling your suspension tighter which will require a longer ridgeline, if you have one.

EDIT - I gotcha. I'll make a longer ridgeline to see if that helps.

One more question. With whipping, Jeff's page suggests using a "W" whipping (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeHammock2.html) for more support on the knees while sleeping on your side. I know this method doesn't utilize an end channel, but is it possible to get the same results while still using the channel for whipping?

Knotty
08-03-2012, 10:49
Each method for treating the hammock ends will produce different results in how the hammock supports you. Experiment until you find what you like.

Personally, I haven't played around much with the different end treatments. As a side/back sleeper the knob style gathered end in my instructions has proven comfortable for me, so I stick with it. I also own a Hennessy Explorer, which I find comfortable and a Speer, which is not comfortable for me.

I'll stop here, as I'd prefer this thread remain focused on the gathered end technique shown in the instructions, so things don't get too confusing.

Grapenut
09-01-2012, 21:14
Knotty, bought a sewing machine today and this was my first project. Thanks for the video! It turned out great. Going to Mod a footbox for it tomorrow. Again, appreciate the video.

G-Nut :shades:

scooterbrown
09-02-2012, 07:38
I'm going to be trying this on a new hammock as soon as my material ship.

But right now I have an ENO DN and for the life of me I cannot get rid of all the loose material where my head lies. I don't mind it too much down around my feet. I added the 'stretch sides mod' and I can see where that will help hold a quilt in, but even with the stretch side on my "head side" it doesn't keep the material from falling in my face. Even lying on the diagonal I can cover up like a burrito.

So I've been playing with some different whip styles and none have helped. Is this hammock just too big for me (I'm 5'6"). Right now I have a love / hate relationship with this thing.

Any advice on this one?

Knotty
09-04-2012, 21:06
Knotty, bought a sewing machine today and this was my first project. Thanks for the video! It turned out great. Going to Mod a footbox for it tomorrow. Again, appreciate the video.

G-Nut :shades:

Excellent. Will you be using the stretch-side method for the footbox?


I'm going to be trying this on a new hammock as soon as my material ship.

But right now I have an ENO DN and for the life of me I cannot get rid of all the loose material where my head lies. I don't mind it too much down around my feet. I added the 'stretch sides mod' and I can see where that will help hold a quilt in, but even with the stretch side on my "head side" it doesn't keep the material from falling in my face. Even lying on the diagonal I can cover up like a burrito.

So I've been playing with some different whip styles and none have helped. Is this hammock just too big for me (I'm 5'6"). Right now I have a love / hate relationship with this thing.

Any advice on this one?

One of the downsides of large hammocks, especially if you're not tall. WV has pioneered a variation of the stretch-side where he runs a bungee the entire length of the hem. That might be your answer.

flashbang009
09-05-2012, 12:50
But right now I have an ENO DN and for the life of me I cannot get rid of all the loose material where my head lies. I don't mind it too much down around my feet. I added the 'stretch sides mod' and I can see where that will help hold a quilt in, but even with the stretch side on my "head side" it doesn't keep the material from falling in my face. Even lying on the diagonal I can cover up like a burrito.

So I've been playing with some different whip styles and none have helped. Is this hammock just too big for me (I'm 5'6"). Right now I have a love / hate relationship with this thing.

Any advice on this one?

One other option would be adjusting your ridgeline, or in essence how taught your hammock is. Definitely a little on the large side for your height though.

kiwi
10-13-2012, 02:20
hey knotty real straight forward thank you sir. but its all your falt as i have gone and made two hammocks. LOL!!!!

offtrail
12-10-2012, 23:49
Thank you for this very informative video. It really does help us beginners...OT

Mojodax
01-15-2013, 21:27
Simple instructions. Simple hammock. Simply awesome. 2 down, 28 to go. Got a scout troop anxious to give this a try.

Spyvenom
01-17-2013, 12:10
Very nice. I did mine differently but like your method better. I will definitely change mine.
Thanks.

Oper8or
02-26-2013, 19:54
I just made my first GEH. I like the way it lays much more than a stitched end with a loop. Comfy. Although I did find out that the next thing I need to make is an underquilt. 17f is cold as heck when you have nothing under you!

doogie
04-05-2013, 13:00
I'm getting ready for an overnight trip with the scouts next weekend and when taking my DIY gathered end hammock off of my turtle dog stand I noticed that I had a small pull in the fabric. Should I be concerned about this? Any repair that I could/should do? I'm guessing that it was a rogue thorn that caught it at some point. I was thinking that if I do anything it would probably be a small piece of duct tape. Any thoughts?

Otter1
04-05-2013, 13:17
where is the pull located? Ripstop doesn't always "stop"!

doogie
04-05-2013, 14:10
where is the pull located? Ripstop doesn't always "stop"!

It's about 18" from the foot end, roughly in the middle. I'll see if I can snap a pic tonight.

doogie
04-05-2013, 18:54
It's about 18" from the foot end, roughly in the middle. I'll see if I can snap a pic tonight.

The pull. It is across the hammock, roughly in the middle about 14" from the foot end. I think I'll just leave it.
https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/2/1/5/9/6/p1000135_2.jpg


Lower angle to show pull
https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/2/1/5/9/6/p1000136_2.jpg

Otter1
04-05-2013, 19:35
Tenacious tape on both sides, after applying seam sealer to the tear (and let it cure).

Just be careful - my boney heels would enlarge that tear when I shift around.

Apollyon
04-15-2013, 04:40
I will be trying this method soon, i made one from the instructions on tothewoods i am curious if there will be much of a diffrence.

Gannoli
05-12-2013, 17:57
Great how-to Knotty. I have wanted to get into hammock camping buy didn't want to spend the $50+ on a ENO just to try it out. Plus I love DIY. Any ideas on anywhere else to get the rip stop? My Walmart doesn't have it and its $6.99 per yard at Joann's!

silentorpheus
05-12-2013, 22:21
Great how-to Knotty. I have wanted to get into hammock camping buy didn't want to spend the $50+ on a ENO just to try it out. Plus I love DIY. Any ideas on anywhere else to get the rip stop? My Walmart doesn't have it and its $6.99 per yard at Joann's!

Try http://www.backwoodsdaydreamer.com/

Or there's a subforum in the DIY forum called "fabrics", and there's a sticky in there that lists a lot of the sites selling outdoor fabrics.

But Scott over at DIYGearsupply/Backwoodsdaydreamer is a great one stop shop, a good starting point.

Hammonkey
06-24-2013, 20:08
Has anyone tried cutting the whipped ends at a diagonal so it looks more like this?
http://www.math-salamanders.com/images/practice-math-sheets-parallelogram-ns-bw.gif

How does it hang?

I've also considered putting a slight concave curve on the diagonal as well.

I'd like to reduce/eliminate pressure on my inside leg and get an as flat as possible lay.

TATO
06-25-2013, 05:24
I have done the diagonal cut with the last one I made. I really can't tell the difference. Maybe with more of a diagonal cut would show results. I only had about a 6inch offset at the head and foot end for the cut.

Knotty
07-01-2013, 13:03
Hammonkey - The diagonal (rhombus) cut looks like it should be helpful until you realize that once the material is gathered and both ends hung from suspension the rhombus shape kind of goes away. This is because the flexible material can't enforce the shape. Ultimately the two ends have to be inline with each other and not offset, like they are in the picture.

If you want to experiment, use rope to whip the ends and you can play with things like pulling a little more material out at the edges vs. the center or pulling more out just on one side. It's easy to whip and unwhip as you try different combinations. Just Jeff has great instructions on his web site (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeHammock2.html).

Bucs57
07-05-2013, 07:17
Ok, just found this thread and just had to give it try. Totally awesome thread. Thanks Knotty for instructions. Anyway, so I got my first one made from 1.9 oz ripstop along with learning to sew. I made a few stuff sacks to practice before attempting the hammock. Getting better and hammock turned out good for my first one. But, I had a really hard time with rolled hem on with the ripstop. Couldnt get fold to lay down. I ironed hem and pinned it, but still had hard time. Anyone got any suggestions on making the rolled hem? I have googled rolled hem and most of what I found to help was a rolled hem presser foot?

hppyfngy
07-05-2013, 12:23
Ok, just found this thread and just had to give it try. Totally awesome thread. Thanks Knotty for instructions. Anyway, so I got my first one made from 1.9 oz ripstop along with learning to sew. I made a few stuff sacks to practice before attempting the hammock. Getting better and hammock turned out good for my first one. But, I had a really hard time with rolled hem on with the ripstop. Couldnt get fold to lay down. I ironed hem and pinned it, but still had hard time. Anyone got any suggestions on making the rolled hem? I have googled rolled hem and most of what I found to help was a rolled hem presser foot?

Clothes pins. :-)

Seriously, pin the material in one way or another until you get the hang of it. But to keep it flat, try having your left hand "pulling" the fabric in back of the foot, as your right hand guides the fabric and maintains enough tension to keep the fabric laying down. Maintaining pace with the feed dogs of course... don't pull too hard!

Knotty
07-09-2013, 14:33
I've never found ironing to be of much help with ripstop nylon. Sometimes I'll pin or clip the hem but most times I just fold as I sew. With practice your hems will improve and the cosmetics really don't matter much since the hem isn't structural.

ErnieNKy
08-18-2013, 14:17
I used paper clips to hold my hem as I sewed...It worked pretty well.

gt7599a
08-18-2013, 18:38
Masking tape (someone else's idea) works well. Works great on silnylon too

Ed

Hammonkey
08-18-2013, 22:17
Masking tape can barely stick to itself.. I have a hard time believing it sticks to silnylon.

gmcttr
08-19-2013, 06:22
Rolled hem...roll it, hold it, sew it, repeat.......

i2v-9mUTldU

SCWalker
08-19-2013, 06:50
Rolled hem...roll it, hold it, sew it, repeat.......

i2v-9mUTldU

Made it look easy. :lol:

Zilla
08-29-2013, 06:31
Rolled hem...roll it, hold it, sew it, repeat.......

i2v-9mUTldU



i am about to tackle my first diy hammock,reason being that i am a big guy so i have deciided to get some material and make my own.
What i plan to do is use 2 pieces of ripstop 1.9 oz 70 d and sew them together for extra strenth and security,my question is-
What kind of thread exactly do i need to use, i plan on atleast a triple stitch,
I am about 350lbs right now and i am working on losing weight but it is not east.
I need to feel secure in my hammock and i will NOT give up hanging,i have several hammocks that are rated for 400lbs and i just dont feel that safe and it is not as relaxing as it should be

Zilla
08-29-2013, 07:00
i am about to tackle my first diy hammock,reason being that i am a big guy so i have deciided to get some material and make my own.
What i plan to do is use 2 pieces of ripstop 1.9 oz 70 d and sew them together for extra strenth and security,my question is-
What kind of thread exactly do i need to use, i plan on atleast a triple stitch,
I am about 350lbs right now and i am working on losing weight but it is not east.
I need to feel secure in my hammock and i will NOT give up hanging,i have several hammocks that are rated for 400lbs and i just dont feel that safe and it is not as relaxing as it should be

I just found the perfect thread on diy gear supply,thanks for all the help

Pipsissewa
08-29-2013, 09:08
Sorry no one answered you sooner, Saedy. But, you're right. Gutermann thread is just the ticket. Just remember that--perhaps counter-intuitively (it was to me anyway ;) )--FEWER stitches per inch is stronger than more. More than seven straight stitches per inch (I THINK that's right--someone correct me if I'm wrong) perforates the fabric to a degree greater than the holding strength it gives. (think postage stamps!)

And straight stitches are stronger than zig-zags. Zig-zags are practically in the realm of decorative.

And, finally, match your thread to your fabric. Get polyester thread to sew polyester, nylon to sew nylon. Their stretch, strength and shrinkage (if any) will better match the fabric.

And that's all I know about thread.


Best of luck to you. Can't wait for you to post PICTURES of your DIY! :D

gmcttr
08-29-2013, 11:29
I just found the perfect thread on diy gear supply,thanks for all the help

I use the Mara 70. I find the Tera 40 to be a heavier weight that doesn't work as well in my home sewing machines. I haven't tried the smaller Tera 35 and 50.

A triple stitch is normally used on the end channels, but will not add any strength on the long sides. A single row of stitching will be fine there.

Did you notice the hammock DIY instructions (http://www.backwoodsdaydreamer.com/diy-guides/hammock/) while your were on the DIY Gear site?

SCWalker
08-29-2013, 16:08
I use the Mara 70. I find the Tera 40 to be a heavier weight that doesn't work as well in my home sewing machines. I haven't tried the smaller Tera 35 and 50.

A triple stitch is normally used on the end channels, but will not add any strength on the long sides. A single row of stitching will be fine there.

Did you notice the hammock DIY instructions (http://www.backwoodsdaydreamer.com/diy-guides/hammock/) while your were on the DIY Gear site?

Thanks fer dat.

Eagle84
09-12-2013, 11:39
Quick question on fabric widths. Serious noob here. I am currently, eagerly awaiting my first order of materials for my first hammock which I decided try this gathered end hammock method. What I ordered was the taffeta tablecloth from tablecloth factory. I ordered two and am planning on one for myself and one for my son. I have been camping since I was 8 and he is 8 now and we have been destined to be groundpounders until I recently discovered this community.

My intention is to do both hammocks with the Knotty stretch-mod. I ordered the 90" width for myself and the 60"(which seems to be the standard) for my son. But here's my question, I've read through 36 pages and got more informed with every one but the one question I came up with wasn't addressed, mostly because of the width fabric I ordered. My thought is since I have the wider material, folding the sides over and making, essentially, sleeves for sliding sleeping pad material for insulation. Essentially the sides of an ersatz SPE. I'm not yet used to thinking in terms of fabric/stitching stress or how things will affect the lay. I was thinking out loud and thought I'd bring it to the experts.

Knotty
09-12-2013, 14:17
IMHO 90" is just too wide. I have a 156x90" from tableclothsfactory.com that I used to make an "tablecloth Brazilian (https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=57606)" and ended up trimming material off one side and re-hemming it. With a hammock that's gathered (by any method) as the material get's wider what starts to happen is it begins to start forming a tube rather than just getting wider.

Keeping the material and folding it over to create pockets may be doable. The ends will be caught up in the gather, so you'll have to make openings somewhere along the length to provide access for pads. Please document your work so we all can learn.

Eagle84
09-12-2013, 16:05
Huh, hadn't thought about trimming the edge re-hemming. Then using that material by reattaching and making sleeves? Makes more sense if the ends get too bunched up for effective binding. Thanks for the idea. I'll definitely take photos as I go along either to help others along or as a dire warning to not proceed! Either way it's a win. You don't learn unless you do. I have been guided along this path immensely by this forum, especially this thread. If I can return back a little info that's important.

samsara
09-12-2013, 16:22
I actually did the big tablecloth Brazilian with the 90" wide tablecloth and love it. But it also isn't gathered, I did the end channel with 9" mini-spreader bar. I like the big floppy sides but I think that most might not like it. I use the sides as insulation over my face (I'm a side sleeper) and sometimes fold 6 inches of the side over and use it instead of a pillow when lounging and watching TV.

To each their own :-)

Dave

Eagle84
09-12-2013, 19:55
I will have to find the plans for a Brazilian on here. It's a shame I might have to order another tablecloth and make a second smaller hammock. I'm crushed, really I am. . .at least that's what I'll tell the wife.

Or cut the larger cloth down and make a double with room to slide a pad/insulation in between them. Not really worried about weight at this stage. We are car campers. When my son gets a little older and stronger and crosses over into Boy Scouts we'll start fighting the lightweight fight for backpacking.

This really is a madness. I don't even have my materials yet and I've already planned 3 types of hammocks.

Syrrka
09-13-2013, 15:41
If you want to experiment, use rope to whip the ends and you can play with things like pulling a little more material out at the edges vs. the center or pulling more out just on one side. It's easy to whip and unwhip as you try different combinations. Just Jeff has great instructions on his web site (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeHammock2.html).

Thank you for the link! I think it will solve my problems with the flappy loose sides that I do not like.

lessee.....1. The ENO = gateway hammock, 2. my pretty poly (dusty lavender) experiment with narrower width as I am only 5 ft tall hammock, and 3. now a couple of new whipping methods...... Moar Fabric!!!!!! Gee, only a month ago I was hammock-less..... :D

hangunder
09-13-2013, 20:04
Thanks for the informative video knotty. I'm currently enjoying my maiden hang in a gathered end I made today. So simple.

iRokk
09-14-2013, 12:12
I just made my 11' 1.1 knotty mod. It is so far the most comfortable hammock I've been in!

Andyaux
09-26-2013, 20:19
Just made a sheet hammock to test my design and i really like your method keep up the posts.

dimjim
10-17-2013, 12:05
Just thought I'd say thanks for all the great info in this post. I just finished my first DIY project - a SL hammock out of 1.1oz ripstop nylon with sewn end channels. I did three courses of stitches on the end channel, and then looped my whoopie slings right through the channels, forgoing the whipped ends.

It seems strong enough so far, but I'll be keeping a close eye on the stitching in the end channels. Other than some less than straight stitches I'm very pleased :) And it clocks in at only 5.15 oz. Not bad!

Knotty
10-17-2013, 20:58
Keep those DIY hammocks coming. :)

hilo4321
10-28-2013, 00:17
I just finished mine! Got to test it out for a little while, and it was sooo much more comfortable than the ENO. The difference really surprised me.

I'll add another "thank you!" to the chorus!

Oakseed
10-28-2013, 11:53
Test hanghttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/8ytyqazu.jpg
detailshttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/2usegu3u.jpg
Maiden voyagehttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/egytadur.jpg

Boon Booni
11-01-2013, 19:02
Test hanghttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/8ytyqazu.jpg
detailshttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/2usegu3u.jpg
Maiden voyagehttp://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/29/egytadur.jpg

Wow, that looks awesome. What are the dimensions?

Oakseed
11-05-2013, 21:53
It is 138"x59.5" finished dimensions. I spent last weekend at a Boy Scout training course and I found I could actually sleep on my side in it! I do give some credit for that to my thermarest pad which makes a nice wide birth.

Oakseed
11-05-2013, 22:14
This is my first hang with a bull line suspension. 30' of bull line with the alpine butterfly loops tied 114" apart and larks headed onto the gathered ends.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/06/tejeduha.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/06/agu9ege5.jpg

outbackpacker3
11-26-2013, 12:26
I have a question I saw in another video that the side hem should be zigzag stitched to allow for stretch but in the video here its not is there any advantage or disadvantage to either way?

SCWalker
11-27-2013, 00:13
I have a question I saw in another video that the side hem should be zigzag stitched to allow for stretch but in the video here its not is there any advantage or disadvantage to either way?

I prefer the zig zag and feel it's a little more forgiving,however,most of the retail hammocks I have seen do fine with straight stitching.My opinion only and I honestly don't have much hanging experience to really give advice.My experience comes from auto,RV,and marine upholstery experience.

Clinton
11-27-2013, 00:16
I do a straight stitch but loose on the tension and it stretches just fine. I have a decent commercial ss machine @1300 stitches per min. Can do 9 feet in @ 40 seconds. No issues made @22 hammocks so far.

gmcttr
11-27-2013, 10:40
I used a straight stitch on all the hammocks I've made with no problems at all. Remember, there are three layers of fabric in the rolled hem edges (of a single layer hammock) so there is less stretch than in the rest of the hammock body.

Knotty
11-27-2013, 23:53
Straight stitch is all that's needed for the hems. Zigzag just complicates things with no real advantage.

I've made many hammocks, all with a straight stitch, and haven't popped a thread yet.

Broken Halo
02-25-2014, 11:58
Have you guys found a preference of 1.1 doubled vs 1.9 single layer?

gmcttr
02-25-2014, 12:30
Have you guys found a preference of 1.1 doubled vs 1.9 single layer?

The biggest difference would be if you ever contemplate using a pad, they are easier to manage when placed between the layers of a DL hammock vs on top of a single layer.

Knotty
03-03-2014, 17:57
Have you guys found a preference of 1.1 doubled vs 1.9 single layer?

+1 on gmcttr's comment.

Now, I don't use pads, so all but one hammock I've made has been a single layer. Also, it's a function of weight. Many people can get by with a single layer 1.1 but others will need 1.9 to avoid having the material fail.

JimmyFergus
05-27-2014, 08:19
Thank you Knotty! The simplicity of this hammock, with no structural sewing and very clear instructions, made me much more confident of success. I haven't touched a sewing machine since I was ~10, playing with my mother's one on scrap cloth.

I thought I'd chime in with one specific lesson I learned about hems: For a beginner like me, with light slippery nylon ripstop (Dutchware's Argon 1.6 (http://dutchwaregear.com/argon-1.6.html)), pinning the hems up first made the whole process take a fraction of the time with much better results.

Experienced sewers may find it easy folding over hems as they sew, but I was doing 4-6 inches, preparing the next section, and so on, and got an untidy hem with uneven width. For the end hems I changed strategy and prepared the whole length with pins every 6-8" to hold it in a good fold. Then I could whiz down the whole hem in one go, pulling pins out as I went, and the result was loads better, much faster including pinning time, and a fraction of the aggravation and stress.

I think I will be doing something to make the sides less floppy. Whether I shorten the edges or go with your shock-cord tightener I'm not sure. I took 4 yards, trimmed about 9" off (for stuff sacks), then cut off my first end-hem when I remembered I had to do the sides before the ends, and the end result between whippings is 10'9".

The gathered end knot of cloth was much smaller than I'd anticipated. That features had had me feeling this was a compromise design, but in fact it's <2" in diameter and really a non-issue aesthetically or functionally. I like the peace of mind of not relying on seam strength.

My bought hammock was over-subscribed, with my children and their friends wanting in so I never got to use it. I now see that having two hammocks does not solve this problem... I may be buying more cloth, webbing and Amsteel...

jeffrey.bean
07-02-2014, 20:50
Thanks knotty, I was looking to buy my son and I's first camping hammocks but with so many to choose from and options, I thought my head would explode.
I'd rather make something myself, so once I figure out what colors we want, I'm going to place an order.

snidetripod
07-19-2014, 10:49
Thanks Knotty for this great tutorial.

I have been toying with the idea of making my own hammock for about a year now. I have read this thread about twenty times, and I think I am ready to take the plunge. I plan to make six hammocks in total, two for my kids, and four for a giveaway at the end on the summer. I plan to build the four at eleven feet, while the other two at nine, and use 1.9 rip stop.
I believe I can follow the direction at the beginning of this thread, but i need to know what thread should I use, and what stitch length is recommended? I have heard that you can actually weaken the fabric if too many stitches are made with the wrong thread.
I will post some pictures of my projects as I start to work on them. I am waiting for materials as we speak.

bjanzen
07-19-2014, 11:47
I am sure others will chime in but what I have found is the needle used is more important than the other items. Look for the smallest needle for the sewing machine that you can find easily available and buy a pack of them. Making the smallest hole in the nylon is very important since it doesn't act the same as standard fabrics. I then use the a thread that I can manage through the tiny needle. The thread per inch matters too but if you play with the machine you will find something that seems to have a balance between tight and loose stitching. Also set the bobbin tension so the stitching is balanced top and bottom. Check YouTube videos if you need a demo on the thread injection process.

shaq67225
07-27-2014, 18:17
Will zing it work for the whipping?

doogie
07-28-2014, 06:15
Will zing it work for the whipping?
It would, but it's overkill and I wouldn't advise it due to its poor knot holding properties. This is one of the few cases where paracord is a good candidate. I gutted my paracord when using it in this case. It just seems to lay better.

krazykev111
11-18-2014, 14:50
Wow, i just read all 40 pages covering the past 5 years. Learned a lot and I am ready to make my own.

doogie
11-18-2014, 15:00
Wow, i just read all 40 pages covering the past 5 years. Learned a lot and I am ready to make my own.

Careful it's addictive.

BTW, you can change your number of messages per page. At 50/page there are only 8 pages :)

rainy rider
05-12-2015, 11:38
Great tutorial, Knotty. After watching I was inspired to make one for my dad for father's day/his birthday. I made one for myself first as my experience with injecting thread was measured in seconds prior to this project and I wanted to get some practice before making his. got some 1.9 oz ripstop from ripstopbytheroll and some webbing, cinch buckles and amsteel from DIYgear supply. Made the straps and stuff sack following DIYGearSupply instructions and followed Opie's instructions for the continuous loop. Great wealth of knowledge here at HF. Everything went great on the first one and the kids and I took it for a little test on Sunday. My oldest helped sew the stuff sack and was pretty proud of her work. My dad's turned out great as well. Thanks for the inspiration.

Bryan


108505

Zorban
08-19-2015, 19:03
This is a great video that answers a lot of questions. But does any one know what I would do if I wanted to use cinch buckles instead of Whoopie strings? Also, where do you guys go for your hammock material?

geneaut
08-24-2015, 13:40
This is a great video that answers a lot of questions. But does any one know what I would do if I wanted to use cinch buckles instead of Whoopie strings? Also, where do you guys go for your hammock material?

Put your cinch buckles on amsteel continous loops and larkshead them under the gathered end ball.

Hammock Material can be had from a number of places. I'd suggest the following 'hammock friendly' vendors:

Ripstop By The Roll
Dutchware
DIYGear

I've also had luck using eBay, but you have to be willing to buy something sight unseen, and forego the tried and true customer service of the vendors I've mentioned above.

geneaut
08-24-2015, 13:48
I used Knotty's method yesterday to make an 11' hammock from black 1.9oz ripstop. Construction was much quicker versus the end channel method I had been using, or I'm just getting to be a quicker sewer :)

114760

bourbonrepository
08-24-2015, 14:28
Built a Knotty Special last week but decided I needed to try it with a ridge line. Ordered it on Friday and thanks to Stu and his super fast shipping was able to get it rigged up today. I love it!

114763

troyji
09-27-2015, 20:16
Yet another Knotty build. The paracord does not hold the square knot. I will have to look for more abrasive cordage or a different knot.

116684

Kvothe
10-02-2015, 06:34
Great video! I have watched several videos but none made clear what to do so fast and simple :) Thanks!

jadekayak
04-23-2016, 22:25
Nice tutorial for those who can think.

I double stitch the side seams to keep edges flat but not really nesecarry.

I do the ends ASME as yours.

I would never trust my life to just a few rows of stitching.

I even run 5 or 6 lines of embroidery satin stitch over 8 runs of straight stitching on my tree straps(cause I can-im an embroiderer)
Otherwise would have to barrack with heavier thread.

Nice build

jadekayak
04-23-2016, 22:42
The needles used should be size 60 or 65 ballpoints.

You can use sharps but they will cut the threads in places.

For thread any outdoor polyester is good.

I flog small cobs of embroidery polyester thread,size 40.

Not fussy on brand but I prefer Madeira.
Coates,saba,sulky are all good.

Stitch length-finer materials can use smaller stitches but nothing smaller than 4mm.

For bridge hammocks when sewing webbing 6 to 8 mm is a good size but your need heavier thread and larger needles.

When I made my 1 man tentsile type trillion I had problems with my singer 328k because it didn't have the strength to sew through the webbing and Max stitch length too short.(sample worked fine but I didn't like the lay as I made it a bit small)

Hope this helps

jadekayak
04-23-2016, 22:53
I have a question I saw in another video that the side hem should be zigzag stitched to allow for stretch but in the video here its not is there any advantage or disadvantage to either way?

One of the main reasons for straight stitching only is that most of these hammocks are made on commercial machines in bulk(in Asian countries).
Most of these machines do not do zig zag.
Twin or triple stitching usually done in a single run.
Seams done with folders(automaticly folds seams so you just need to feed the machine).

You would be surprised if you knew where ENO hammocks are made.

Sailmakers usually use zig zag

jadekayak
04-23-2016, 23:00
Rolled hem...roll it, hold it, sew it, repeat.......

i2v-9mUTldU

What's the point posting a video and making it private

Leavitt
06-25-2016, 20:19
The needles used should be size 60 or 65 ballpoints.

I flog small cobs of embroidery polyester thread,size 40.

Not fussy on brand but I prefer Madeira.
Coates,saba,sulky are all good.

When I made my 1 man tentsile type trillion I had problems with my singer 328k because it didn't have the strength to sew through the webbing and Max stitch length too short.(sample worked fine but I didn't like the lay as I made it a bit small)

Hope this helps


I suddenly realized how very little I know about sewing... :scared:

I will make a 72" wide DIY because my sweet spot on a 60" his my heels hanging of into space. Knotty, thanks for the wealth of information!!!

Beeip
06-25-2016, 22:45
I suddenly realized how very little I know about sewing... :scared:

I will make a 72" wide DIY because my sweet spot on a 60" his my heels hanging of into space. Knotty, thanks for the wealth of information!!!

That post was like reading Greek, and I sew a lot. Smaller numbers on needles = smaller point (Sewing only! Not applicable in medicine!). Use polyester thread so it doesn't rot. "Triple stitched" refers to three single stitches side-by-side.

The problem with a 72" wide hammock is finding fabric wide enough for the job. Do a flat-felled seam (look it up, and double-stitched!) and don't put the seam directly beneath you, i.e., the colored thirds you see in ENOs and other parachute hammocks.

There. I just gave you an associates in Thread Injection. And don't forget to lock the stitches when you start and finish. :)




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Leavitt
06-26-2016, 15:52
That post was like reading Greek, and I sew a lot. Smaller numbers on needles = smaller point (Sewing only! Not applicable in medicine!). Use polyester thread so it doesn't rot. "Triple stitched" refers to three single stitches side-by-side.

The problem with a 72" wide hammock is finding fabric wide enough for the job. Do a flat-felled seam (look it up, and double-stitched!) and don't put the seam directly beneath you, i.e., the colored thirds you see in ENOs and other parachute hammocks.

There. I just gave you an associates in Thread Injection. And don't forget to lock the stitches when you start and finish. :)


Thanks for the AA!!! I think I got a taste of my own medicine with that post; I have a couple of "hobbies which shall not be named" that can be intricate and confusing. It all makes sense if you live it everyday but to the new guy, it's just numbers. It's obvious that jadekayak knows this stuff inside out and backwards, and there are answers in that post to questions that I don't even know I should be asking; someday I'll know enough to ask and those answers are already waiting for me.

I especially appreciate the recommendation of the flat felled seam, as I have discovered that the wider rolls are less common. Hopefully I will find a roll of fabric that's 72", thus avoiding the need but I may resort to the flat felled seam. When I pull the trigger (so to speak) I'll post it in the DIY thread. Being successful in my first DIY is probably the worst thing that can happen to me because then I'll have to make EVERYTHING.

Refreshing
09-13-2016, 15:39
I just wanted to say thanks for the video. Short and informative, just how I like it.

ACoffee
10-20-2016, 12:06
This might be a dumb newbie question, but is there a reason to use mason's line for the whipping instead of something like 1.75 Zing-it or even maybe an individual strand (unbraided) of Amsteel? I have these on hand already, so I was wondering if there was some special property of mason's line that made it better for this application. I know most of the weight is held by the bundle of fabric, but how strong does the string used for whipping need to be?

SCWalker
10-20-2016, 13:16
This might be a dumb newbie question, but is there a reason to use mason's line for the whipping instead of something like 1.75 Zing-it or even maybe an individual strand (unbraided) of Amsteel? I have these on hand already, so I was wondering if there was some special property of mason's line that made it better for this application. I know most of the weight is held by the bundle of fabric, but how strong does the string used for whipping need to be?

Masons line is entirely to stretchy and frays really easy.I'm dealing with masons line at home,while I'm building a workshop.It even sucks for it's intended purpose.

Syb
10-21-2016, 13:42
This might be a dumb newbie question, but is there a reason to use mason's line for the whipping instead of something like 1.75 Zing-it or even maybe an individual strand (unbraided) of Amsteel? I have these on hand already, so I was wondering if there was some special property of mason's line that made it better for this application. I know most of the weight is held by the bundle of fabric, but how strong does the string used for whipping need to be?
The strength of the string isn't really an issue. It might have been what he had on hand at the time. I made a gathered end hammock based off these instructions with mason line and had no issues over 4 years with the hammock. If I were to do it again, I'd have no reason not to use mason line.

IroquoisArcher
01-17-2017, 16:00
Just browsing and wondering if the link to video and pictures are bad? Mine for pics. says by google that it isn't there and get an error on the video. Just me?

sidneyhornblower
01-17-2017, 16:49
Just browsing and wondering if the link to video and pictures are bad? Mine for pics. says by google that it isn't there and get an error on the video. Just me?
Pic link in Knotty's original 2010 post returns a 404 error. Video link works for me. No surprise, I guess, that a link that old is dead. I did not go through the entire thread to see if they are updated.

WillUpnDown
12-12-2017, 19:40
Some Noob (Newbie) questions:
1. Does the Knotty Mod work best with a parallelogram shape?

2. Is it possible to just slice a longitudinal gash and add a foot box extension (I still can quite figure foot boxes out. They just seem like pockets hanging off the side.) I don't understand how you can add a triangle (or half oval).

3. The Cord through the Gathered end--is it's only purpose to make that big knot? or can a hammock hang from a cord going through this channel? (If not, what's the failure like? the cord just ripping out the end?) It seems to me that if I double up the end fold (see diagram) and stitch it (I'd do three not just two) then the gathered end cord could also be the hanging cord. Anyone know for certain if this is a bad idea?

I've got a dozen more questions, a sewing machine some rip stop.....

Will

WV
12-13-2017, 14:10
Masons line is entirely too stretchy and frays really easy.I'm dealing with masons line at home,while I'm building a workshop.It even sucks for it's intended purpose.
In this use the stretch is an advantage, and the line isn't subject to any abrasion. The reasons to use mason's line are that it's cheap and it works, whatever its limitations when used elsewhere. I once used it for tarp tieouts, but stopped for exactly the reasons that SCWalker cited.

MAD777
12-14-2017, 08:36
Some Noob (Newbie) questions:
1. Does the Knotty Mod work best with a parallelogram shape?

2. Is it possible to just slice a longitudinal gash and add a foot box extension (I still can quite figure foot boxes out. They just seem like pockets hanging off the side.) I don't understand how you can add a triangle (or half oval).

3. The Cord through the Gathered end--is it's only purpose to make that big knot? or can a hammock hang from a cord going through this channel? (If not, what's the failure like? the cord just ripping out the end?) It seems to me that if I double up the end fold (see diagram) and stitch it (I'd do three not just two) then the gathered end cord could also be the hanging cord. Anyone know for certain if this is a bad idea?

I've got a dozen more questions, a sewing machine some rip stop.....

Will

1. The Knotty Mod works with rectangle or parallelogram.
2. No cutting. Simply sew a triangle or semi-circle shaped piece of fabric where you feet land. Sew the long side of the triangle, or straight edge of the semi-circle, to the hammock. Then put shock cord into a rolled seam on the other sides of the fabric piece.
3. You can hang from that cord (use Amsteel) or make a knot using Mason line, which is called Warbonnet style.

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Erick
07-11-2018, 20:58
First of all, thank you for the video. Iím new to both hammock camping and diy camping. This makes an extremely comfortable hammock.

Iím hoping someone can give me a little advice on the ďknobĒ. After laying on it for about an hour it settled and shrank a bit. Iím worried that it might continue shrinking and slip entirely over time. What kinds of knots are you guys using to tie the suspension to the hammock? Iím using a scaffold knot.

Picture attached. I might just be paranoid, but the other buns/knobs seem bigger.

166114

MAD777
07-12-2018, 00:32
I made small continuous loops and larks head them over the knobs. The more tension their is, the tighter they cinch.

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geneaut
07-12-2018, 11:55
I larkshead usually. I've never had a 'knob' fail on me, but I do make sure when I build these that I have lots of fabric there ( usually 3 layers at least ), and I usually gather with paracord so there is more bulk up there.

DuctTapeMessiah
07-12-2018, 14:43
First of all, thank you for the video. Iím new to both hammock camping and diy camping. This makes an extremely comfortable hammock.

Iím hoping someone can give me a little advice on the ďknobĒ. After laying on it for about an hour it settled and shrank a bit. Iím worried that it might continue shrinking and slip entirely over time. What kinds of knots are you guys using to tie the suspension to the hammock? Iím using a scaffold knot.

Picture attached. I might just be paranoid, but the other buns/knobs seem bigger.

166114

If you may your continuous loop big enough you can also use a prusik knot but it may be overkill.


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Erick
07-12-2018, 21:06
So, perhaps not surprisingly, my issue was user error. I made the whipping channel too large. Rather than keeping it to about an inch or so, I made it a whopping 6 inches. I thought I could kill two birds with one stone by making a large channel and shortening the hammock length.

This meant the suspension knot wasnít getting the benefit of being pressed against the extra layer of fabric.

After fixing the issue it works fine, with a worry-free lay. Iím surprised what a difference that extra layer of fabric really makes.

Knotty
12-26-2019, 22:23
Been away for a long time, since I no longer backpack due to bad joints, but still sleep most nights in a hammock at home.

Humbled to see that my simple tutorial is still a sticky and has been viewed over a quarter million times!

MikekiM
12-26-2019, 23:02
Been away for a long time, since I no longer backpack due to bad joints, but still sleep most nights in a hammock at home.

Humbled to see that my simple tutorial is still a sticky and has been viewed over a quarter million times!

Glad till see you stop in! Too bad about your joints..

Iíve put Knotty mods in every one of my many DIY hammocks!!


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MAD777
12-27-2019, 01:46
Knotty, it's great to hear that you are still hanging around! [emoji6]

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Shug
12-29-2019, 00:07
Been away for a long time, since I no longer backpack due to bad joints, but still sleep most nights in a hammock at home.

Humbled to see that my simple tutorial is still a sticky and has been viewed over a quarter million times!
You live on Knotty!
Shug