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Pmayojr87
06-28-2019, 12:44
I have decided I like the loco habanero in 0 degree but it will be my first real underquilt. I'm 5'10" and am unsure what length to order? Any recommendations?

cmc4free
06-28-2019, 12:58
I am 6'1" and prefer full length for cooler weather quilts that are rated 20 degrees and below. The ones I have are all 77" -78".
Loco Libre underquilts are so customizable you can size them in 1" increments from 50" up to 83" max.
In my opinion, you'd probably be fine with 75" - 77", if you want a full length.
If weight or even moreso packed volume are important to you, you could also consider a partial length and supplement your lower extremities with a sit pad, piece of reflectix, foam insert from your backpack, etc.

rweb82
06-28-2019, 13:12
At your height, a 70-72" quilt would be full length. Remember, you'll be laying on a diagonal, so you'll get a little bit of extra length because of that. Also, if you use a pillow, you don't really need the quilt insulation under your head, so you could probably get away with 65" and still cover shoulders to feet.

I'm the opposite of most people on this forum, and actually prefer 3/4 length quilts. They are a lot easier to dial in IMO, and don't put extra pressure on my ankle like longer quilts. I do use a pillow for my head and sit pad for under my feet. For the record, I'm 6'1", and my 20 Habanero is 56" long. It spans from my shoulders to lower calf.

Pmayojr87
06-28-2019, 13:21
I already plan on using a piece of refletix on my feet so I may just go with the 70 inch. I'm going to get the 0 degree because I'm ordering my wife a 20 degree. And i can deal with the extra weight when we all go together. And she will not go with me in the extreme cold. I have a piece of a kneeling foam pad from my days as a mechanic I thought about wrapping with reflectix.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

cmc4free
06-28-2019, 13:30
At your height, a 70-72" quilt would be full length. Remember, you'll be laying on a diagonal, so you'll get a little bit of extra length because of that. Also, if you use a pillow, you don't really need the quilt insulation under your head, so you could probably get away with 65" and still cover shoulders to feet.

I'm the opposite of most people on this forum, and actually prefer 3/4 length quilts. They are a lot easier to dial in IMO, and don't put extra pressure on my ankle like longer quilts. I do use a pillow for my head and sit pad for under my feet. For the record, I'm 6'1", and my 20 Habanero is 56" long. It spans from my shoulders to lower calf.

Well said.

I know the geometry for the diagonal (one of my cats is named Pythagoras :D) but in spite of that, I find that at 6'1" and the amount of diagonal I use, I pretty much occupy a 77" quilt corner to corner. Your point about whether you want the quilt to be under your head and/or feet is perfectly valid and a matter of individual preference. I get what you mean about the UQ adding pressure to your feet, but as a counter to that, I don't like the feeling of the cinched channel under my calves or ankles. A sit pad probably negates that though.

FWIW, pictured is me in a 77" UGQ Zeppelin.

175489

175490

rweb82
06-28-2019, 13:48
Well said.

I know the geometry for the diagonal (one of my cats is named Pythagoras :D) but I find that at 6'1" and the amount of diagonal I use, I pretty much occupy a 77" quilt corner to corner. Your point about whether you want the quilt to be under your head and/or feet is perfectly valid and a matter of individual preference. I get what you mean about the UQ adding pressure to your feet, but as a counter to that, I don't like the feeling of the cinched channel under my calves or ankles. A sit pad probably negates that though.

FWIW, pictured is me in a 77" UGQ Zeppelin.

175489

175490

I like your quilt- looks nice and warm! I can't say I have noticed the cinched channel under my legs. I'm probably just oblivious to it at this point, lol. The other thing about me is I had foot surgery last year on my right foot- which so happens to be the one that gets pressed on in my hammock (head left, feet right). While I don't experience any pain in that foot, I may be a little more sensitive to the pressure than I used to be.

cmc4free
06-28-2019, 14:11
I don't have it yet, but I ordered an Operator Series Habanero when George reopened. Those are 50" long so I'll be tinkering around with positioning that one. With a full length quilt, positioning relative to one's body is kind of a non-issue, but cinching the ends to avoid gaps becomes a little more challenging.

To your point, and back to what Pmayojr87 said in post #4, a sit pad or other foam goes a long way toward insulating lower extremities and also relieving pressure on the outboard heel. For heel pressure, I follow the Shug approach of using an underinflated Thermarest pad.

Also, expanding on your point about shorter quilts being easier to dial in, I assume you meant that the shorter a quilt and nearer the ends of the quilt are to the center of the hammock, the less extreme the ridges from the gathered end, and therefore the less likely there will be gaps that the draft collars need to fill. Is that a correct interpretation?

dakotaross
06-28-2019, 14:20
I also like a shorter quilt. My winter incubator is the short model at 73" - fits me neck to heels, and I use both a head and foot pillow. So I'm 70" tall and supplementing a 73" quilt for full coverage.

This is just my opinion, but I don't find that UQ insulation does a whole lot around the feet. Feet typically don't give off that much heat and much of the insulating value of down comes from trapped heat. There's a lot of unused down in the corners opposite the diagonal lay, so I'd rather have that directly on my feet in the form of booties and/or a down pillow. This is one of the reasons I've grown to appreciate the wooki-style quilts as the insulation is more fitted around the lay.

rweb82
06-28-2019, 14:22
I don't have it yet, but I ordered an Operator Series Habanero when George reopened. Those are 50" long so I'll be tinkering around with positioning that one. With a full length quilt, positioning relative to one's body is kind of a non-issue, but cinching the ends to avoid gaps becomes a little more challenging.

To your point, and back to what Pmayojr87 said in post #4, a sit pad or other foam goes a long way toward insulating lower extremities and also relieving pressure on the outboard heel. For heel pressure, I follow the Shug approach of using an underinflated Thermarest pad.

Also, expanding on your point about shorter quilts being easier to dial in, I assume you meant that the shorter a quilt and nearer the ends of the quilt are to the center of the hammock, the less extreme the ridges from the gathered end, and therefore the less likely there will be gaps that the draft collars need to fill. Is that a correct interpretation?

I also use the Thermarest Lite pad for my feet. It really does help to negate the side pressure on my heels. You are correct about my comment regarding 3/4 length quilts being easier to dial in. My body spreads the quilt out at the ends, and I've never had an issue with gaps. Also to that point, I've learned that I don't really need to cinch up the ends much (if at all) on my shorter quilts- which could also explain why I don't feel the cinched channel under my legs.

cmc4free
06-28-2019, 14:23
Feet typically don't give off that much heat...

My wife's sure don't! :lol:

Ohoopee
06-28-2019, 14:34
The older I get, the colder I get at night. My summer quilts are shorter but I sleep
much better with a full length quilt in winter. My Operator Habanero 50" is perfect
for spring, summer and early fall. I have a short winter uq but found fussing with
something else under my feet during night was cumbersome so I just take the
full length uq. Both work well though.