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erric
09-25-2019, 14:46
Hi folks, I wrote a detailed guide (https://redd.it/d8s37t) on Reddit's r/Ultralight on getting the lightest possible hammock setup. It's oriented for the folks on that forum, so a lot of it will be familiar to the users of this forum, but I thought I would post it over here because it may be of use to less experienced hangers. In particular, the suspension section is pretty bare bones. Most of what I wrote there I learned here, so I want to thank this community for being such an incredible repository of hammock knowledge. I would also like to thank the folks at UGQ, George at Loco Libre, Jared at SLD, and "Extra" Mike here on HammockForums, for answering all my questions and helping me narrow down these choices, and Shug for his amazing collection of videos, all of which I've watched at least once. There's plenty I have left to learn so please, if you have any feedback or corrections, I'd love to hear them.

This article is very much geared towards hangers who are willing to spend more time and money to get an ultralight set of gear for distance hiking or simplicity's sake. It is by no means for everyone, and I very strongly believe in the HYOH principle. If this also sounds like a bunch of craziness and gram counting, that's because it absolutely is, and I totally respect those who carry more because that's what they prefer.

Here's the article. References to comments "made below" should be followed up by viewing the comment section of the reddit post:

I've spent the past few months doing exhaustive research on going as light as possible with a hammock. I put in an order for a new top quilt this morning, and I think I've finally got it nailed down. Here's a runthrough of how to shed weight and get a sub 9lb BW, 3 season setup (20 degree) without sacrificing much. For the impatient, here's the lighterpack (https://lighterpack.com/r/g01wxv). Spoilers: it won't be cheap. I should also put a disclaimer here that I will likely leave out many valid options, for both vendors and techniques. Despite filling my brain with so much information about UL gear that there's been little room for anything else, there is such a wealth of information out there that I'm really only scratching the surface.

Hammock (7-11oz, $60-150)
Fabrics
There are four main fabric choices here if we're going as light as we can. All will have a significant amount of stretch, which some people prefer and others find annoying. Most manufacturers, especially big commercial ones, aren't willing to touch these fabrics because they require the user to pay closer attention to how they use them, and have weight limits. It's much simpler for them to overbuild with a stronger fabric, and rest easy that they won't get reports of a man, his wife, and his dog drowning after ripping a massive hole in their product while it was suspended over a swamp. To be clear, you won't exactly have to baby hammocks made in these materials, but care should be taken not to subject them to sudden dynamic loads or put all your weight onto a small point like your hands when getting in or out of them. Hangers over 200lbs might want to consider looking at more robust fabrics like 1.6 HyperD or 1.6 Hexon, though you'll find plenty of perfectly happy and uninjured 200lb+ for all of the fabrics listed below.

I would strongly advise to not be tempted by sub 10ft hammocks unless you are very short, say less than 5'3". A <10ft hammock simply does not provide enough space to get a flat, asymmetrical lay. 11ft will be ideal for most, and 10ft is doable for those under 6ft, albeit still inferior to 11ft in my opinion.

Hexon 1.0
This fabric is sold by DutchWare and is 1.0oz per sq yard. An 11ft bare bones hammock with no bugnet or ridgeline will come out to ~7oz. All of Dutch's hammocks are available in Hexon 1.0. Simply Light Designs will make you a custom Hexon 1.0 hammock with catenary cuts to save even more weight. Hexon has a 200lb maximum weight limit. There are some reports of failures but endless numbers of people who use it as their only hammock fabric and have never had an issue.

MTN 1.3 XL
Sold by Ripstop By The Roll. Dream Hammock offers this as an option on all their hammocks. It weighs more than Hexon but also has a 60lb higher weight limit at 260lbs. As the XL in the name implies, it's wider than the more common ripstop width of 60-63". For some, a larger width means a more comfortable lay as it allows you to lay more diagonally and potentially flatter depending on your hang angle. More width will equate to more weight of course.

Monolite
This fabric is sold by Ripstop By The Roll and is brand new and relatively untested. It doesn't pack down as well as hexon but is the only other fabric that can compete with it in weight. Also, it's transparent, which allows you to see your underquilt through the hammock body for easy adjustment. There is a report on hammockforums of a catastrophic failure with a MYOG hammock made by an experienced hammock user. The weight limit is identical to Hexon 1.0. All of Dream Hammock's offerings are available in this fabric.

1.1oz Ripstop
Sold by RSBTR. DreamHammock won't make you a single layer in this fabric but Simply Light Designs, Hummingbird Hammocks, and AntiGravityGear will. See the post below by /u/oritron, who says it stretches less than other fabrics in this weight range.

Bug Net
There are two main options here if you're going as light as possible:

Half Bug Nets
A half bug net covers only your torso. Typically they will be sewn into the body of the hammock at points on the sides, with a loose unattached section along the bottom for your body to fit in between the net and the hammock, and attached to the hammock ridgeline with a friction knot like a prusik. Your quilt protects your lower body, and the net protects your head and torso. As the owner of a MYOG half bug net hammock I can confirm that it works well. The only premade hammock I'm aware of that features a half bug net is the DutchWare Half Wit. They are a popular MYOG hammock project, and Derek Hansen has instructions for making on his site The Ultimate Hang. He also sells an add on half bug net called "The Hug" which is sold by Arrowhead Equipment. The add on is a full 5oz, however, because it has to wrap around the hammock body. The weight penalty for a sewn in MYOG half bug net or a premade with the Half Wit from DutchWare should be under 3oz.

Head Net
This option will be familiar for most ULers because it is widely deployed by SUL tarp users. Just wear a bug head net and pull your quilt up to your chin.

I'll also make a point here that treating your hammock with permetherin is easy, cheap, and extremely effective. It won't allow you to skip bug protection entirely but it'll do a significant amount of the heavy lifting.

Structural Ridgelines
Going sans ridgeline is certainly possible, but I can't imagine actually doing it. A structural ridgeline makes hang angle far less important to getting proper sag in the hammock, and you can hang very lightweight (sub .5oz) ridgeline organizers from it which serve as easy to reach storage while you're hanging. Ridgelines are either adjustable or non adjustable, and are made with Zing-It/Lash-It or amsteel. Since we're prioritizing low weight, we'll want Zing-It/Lash-It, which is made from Dyneema and comes in 2.2mm (650 breaking strength) and 1.75mm (500lb breaking strength). I am not aware of any failures with lash-it. Non adjustable ridgelines will weigh less than adjustable ones, which are typically spliced whoopie slings or UCRs (Utility Constrictor Ropes). Several manufacturers sell standalone ridgelines and many custom cottage vendors will be happy to make you a hammock with a Lash-It ridgeline.

Some "Lightest" Hammocks
These will all have ridgelines because I can't in good conscience recommend using a hammock without one.

Without Bugnet

<8oz: SLD Streamliner, Hexon 1.0. This is almost certainly the lightest Hammock commercially available. It's offered in a 1.0oz fabric and features large catenary cuts in the body of the fabric to save weight and provide better views when laying in it. Can be made with a lash-it ridgeline.
8.1oz: A netless DutchWare in Hexon 1.0 or a DreamHammock Freebird in Monolite.
8.3oz: AntiGravityGear Quicksilver, 1.1oz Ripstop. This one is ridgelineless just to give an example. I don't recommend it.



With Integrated Bugnet

10.05oz: DutchWare Half-Wit, Hexon 1.0. The lightest premade hammock with an integrated bug net you'll find.
12.6oz: DreamHammock Darien, Monolite. Full length integrated bug net with zipper.
<12.6oz: SLD Trail Lair, Hexon 1.0 or 1.1oz Ripstop. Jared doesn't list weights for his hammocks but it's safe to assume the Trail Lair won't weigh any more than the Darien, especially if you opt for a lash-it ridgeline (DreamHammock uses amsteel standard).


There might be more options available in Hexon 1.0 that I'm not aware of, and more manufacturers are likely to adopt Monolite in the future. There are certainly more manufacturers that use 1.1oz Ripstop. Excluding the SLD Streamliner, the real differences in weight you'll see once you get down to a 1.0oz fabric will come from opting for a fixed ridgeline over an adjustable one, choosing lash-it/zing-it/reflect-it over amsteel for the ridgeline, and saying no to extras like peak shelves, overcovers, oversized zippers, etc. There's also the possibility of having a cottage vendor make you a custom hammock cut down in width, but personally I wouldn't recommend it. Width tracks pretty closely with comfort for most people up to a point.

Suspension (1-6oz, $20-80)
Choosing A Suspension Method
The full breadth of this topic could take up a much longer post of its own. There are dozens of perfectly viable, lightweight methods of hanging your hammock from a tree. Some are lighter than others, some are more versatile, some are easier to learn, and some are faster to set up. Because detailing all of these options is beyond the scope of this post, I'll simply explain why I've gone with the method I have.

I use either 10 or 15' tree straps secured to my hammock with a becket hitch. In hammocking parlance, tree straps are lengths of webbing with a loop sewn in one end. If you see "webbing" you can probably assume it's a simple length of flat, sewn fabric with no loops. If "tree hugger" is used, there's a loop in both ends of the webbing.

For affixing your suspension to the continuous loops of your hammock, there are few lighter options than a becket hitch on a simple tree strap. It is dead simple to tie and will hold every time (see caveat with dyneema straps below). If you need to adjust it, you will have to untie the hitch, but if you are an experienced user it will only take ~5 seconds to do so and retie it as needed. Whoopie slings with hooks, cinch buckles, split rings, and literally dozens of other solutions are easier to adjust, but they all carry other trade offs, and most will weigh more than the bare strap you'll need with a becket hitch suspension. The whoopie sling is a serious competitor for low weight, and it's much easier to adjust, but it will require a two piece system, your whoopie sling, and a separate tree strap to go around the tree. You'll need to have a good idea of the size of the trees in your area to make a decision about how long each of these should be. For me, I don't ever want to have a tree strap that isn't long enough for the tree, or is too long to use the whoopie. With a strap only setup, I only have one element to think about, my tree strap is my suspension, and whether my tree is narrow or thick (I live in the PNW, so trees get thick), my strap will be enough. This is totally a matter of personal preference, and I've used plenty of other suspension systems, so hang your own hang, etc.

Tree Straps
We have a few options here:

Dyneema (1-2.4g/ft)
DutchWare (Spider Web 1.5), Myerstech (search ebay for his store), RSBTR (Venom Straps), and a few others offer dyneema tree straps. Dyneema is the lightest option here, period. I've used both the Dutchware Spider Web and Myerstech dyneema straps, and they feel more like lengths of ribbon than a 1000lb load bearing strap, it's truly impressive. The only issue is that it behaves more like a slippery cord than like a flat strap, and that can cause issues. Becket hitches may require modification to hold effectively. Others have used friction knots and more complex knot systems. Hardware like cinch buckles will slip on dyneema, so they're not an option. The straps will also tend to roll up on themselves lengthwise, which decreases their surface area. The big issue with this is the more narrow the strap, the more force is being applied to the bark of the tree you're hanging from. Irresponsible or ill informed hammock users have done enough damage to trees by using cordage rather than flat, wide straps that hammocks have been banned in some public lands across the country. If you take the time to flatten out your dyneema straps each time you use them, which I can say from personal experience is a massive pain in the ***, good on you, but when I'm exhausted after a 25mi day I have zero interest in spending 10 minutes running my thumb over my hammock suspension over and over. These are a legitimate option for some, but for me, they require too much fiddling. Dutchware has some straps labelled "UHMWPE" that are heavier than the dyneema options listed above but may have fewer issues. I haven't used them personally. See the comment by /u/BeerEqualsGod below.

Polyester/etc (3g/ft - 6g/ft)
Several vendors offer 3.0g/ft to 6g/ft straps. These will take hardware like the many buckle systems out there, and are a totally valid choice if you're not going all out on weight savings. Expect weights for two straps between 10-15ft to be in the 3-8oz range, and even higher for exceptionally high breaking strength weights.

Kevlar (1.8 - 3.5g/ft)
I've found kevlar to be the perfect balance between finicky dyneema and more manageable polyester straps. It still won't take most hardware, but it won't roll in on itself. There are two major concerns: 1. It is highly UV sensitive, so care must be taken to keep it out of direct sunlight for long periods, or risk it degrading and losing strength over time and 2. It's hard to get in light weights. DutchWare formerly stocked it in 1.8g/ft, but now only offers it in >3g/ft. I was able to purchase 2.0g/ft from Jeff Myers at Myerstech by messaging him, but I have no clue if he has more available.

Tarp (3-8oz, $200-350)
There's really only one option for materials here: DCF. HammockGear, Zpacks, MLD, DutchWare, and others sell fantastic DCF hammock tarps. The only real distinction between a hammock tarp and a ground tarp from these manufacturers is that a hammock tarp will typically have a longer ridgeline but an inward cut on the "door" sections to better match the profile of a hammock. Some models will have doors which can be staked down to close off the open areas on either end of the tarp, but those are really only necessary in extreme cold and sideways blowing rain. A skillfully pitched doorless tarp over a skillfully chosen site will keep you dry in 99%+ of precipitation. Panel pulls are not necessary in my opinion but can be nice to have. You can use them with a trekking pole to open up the interior space.

The lightest "standard" DCF tarp is made by HammockGear. Mine came in at 4.95oz. Some of the other manufacturers use more guy outs, which will add weight but might give you a more secure pitch.

Asymmetrical Tarps
MLD and DutchWare each offer an asym DCF tarp. Dutch's comes in at an astounding 3oz with the stuff sack. Asym tarps are notoriously difficult to pitch properly and serve best as a super UL backup when heading out with a rain free forecast, but if you can master using them you can potentially shed a few more ounces over the already amazingly lightweight symmetrical options.

Tarp Suspension
This area is far less important than hammock suspension, because even relatively "heavy" methods of suspending a tarp can come out to ~1oz. Generally speaking, knots are lighter than hardware. A continuous ridgeline is one of the easiest methods but will likely use the most cordage. The absolute lightest method, and the one I favor, is what is sometimes called a "single line suspension." Hennessy Hammocks tarps are the most famous example of this method in use. Essentially, you connect your tarp ridgeline directly to your hammock suspension with a friction knot for adjustability. Be warned, you'll probably need shock cord somewhere in your guylines for this to work, since sitting in the hammock will cause your tarp to sag slightly. This can be mostly mitigated by setting a proper 30 degree hang angle, but ymmv.

Guylines
Go with a narrow gauge Dyneema, preferably sheathed. I use Zpacks 1.2mm Z-Line, which has a breaking strength of 200lbs, more than enough for tarp guy lines. You could probably go even lighter if you can find more narrow widths of dyneema cordage. Linelocs, and other hardware solutions weigh very little and make adjustment easy, but you won't get any lighter than using a marlin spike hitch alone to secure the line to your stakes. The MSH is dead simple, it's barely even a knot - it takes all of one second to "tie." I bowline knot my guy lines directly to my tarp guy out points and they stay connected to my tarp at all times. The total weight of all the lines is less than a third of an ounce.

Stakes
I've used MSR mini groundhogs, Vargo Ti UL nail pegs, Nemo Airpins, and Ti shepard hooks. Your stakes should be situational, wider stakes with more hold like mini groundhogs for loose soil, and narrower stakes like the Vargo nails for compacted tough stuff. Vargo Ti UL shepard hooks are the lightest I've seen personally, but I prefer the groundhogs or nail pegs for durability. Aluminum is a totally valid choice as I've never bent a mini groundhog, though Ti is probably more durable. All of the options I've listed here weigh around a third of an ounce, except for the Vargo shepards which are 0.2oz each.

Insulation (30-40oz, $400-800)
Comparing weights across various insulation offerings and vendors is extremely time consuming and a bit of a crapshoot. There is no standard way to measure quilt length, and that alone prevents true apples to apples comparisons. Add in different fill powers, hydrophobic down treatments, fabrics, widths, and features, and all you can really do is get a ballpark estimate of how much a quilt will weigh vs the warmth it'll provide. I'll run through a few options for both top quilts and underquilts, but I'm almost certainly leaving some manufacturers out. This is also a 3 season setup, so that'll exclude some amazingly light summer options like the Nunatak Nano Blanket. I'll offer some general guidelines for insulation:

Shell material
There are three "lightest" materials I'm aware of that are all roughly in the same weight category. If a manufacturer does not offer one of these, and the material they do offer is heavier, you won't be able to get into the weight ranges I'm targeting here. Since most down in the 900+ FP range weighs more or less the same, the shell material will have a big impact on the final weight of the quilt. Check to see if the vendor explicitly states a material's weight in oz per square yard, because most will only state the denier of the fabric like "7D" or "10D." Denier indicates thickness, not weight, so two 10D fabrics may have totally different weights. Thanks to cmc4free for informing me about corrections to which "7D" is which.


0.56oz MEMBRANE 7 (RSBTR): Formerly used by Loco Libre and perhaps some other vendors. It's currently out of stock with no news of when it'll be in production again. This may be the "7D" Enlightened Equipment used to offer.
0.66oz MEMBRANE 10 (RSBTR): Used by UGQ.
0.67oz Argon 67 (DutchWare): Known for being soft, this material is explicitly offered by Loco Libre Gear, and is likely the material used by other cottage vendors. HammockGear and Nunatak both list their "10d" material as being 0.67oz, so they may use it, though I can't confirm that.
0.74oz MTN 7D (RSBTR): Another "7D." This fabric is not recommended by RSBTR to be used as both the inner and outer of a quilt because it isn't air permeable enough.




Fill Power
Not much to say here, other than that the higher the fill power, the lighter the insulation will be. Shoot for 900+.

Extra Features
Most "extra" features you'll see offered by custom cottage vendors and bigger manufacturers will increase weight. This includes draft collars, cinch systems on the neck or footbox, pad attachment points, zipper closure systems, etc. The one exception is a totally sewn footbox, which is typically a custom option (see UGQ). This is distinct from a sewn and fully insulated footbox, which will add weight.

Sizing
Opt for a tapered quilt. Your feet will be narrower than your shoulders so that's a bit of a no brainer. Personally, I do not pull my quilt up over my head and prefer to wear head insulation like a balaclava or a beanie. The extra length on a quilt to allow you to pull it over your head will likely be heavier than an ultralight down or synthetic beanie, but depending on how much you need, it may be close. Go with what's comfortable since we're talking about a pretty small margin with this one. 50" width should be perfectly acceptable for most. If you are an occasional ground sleeper, bump it up to 55".

Top Quilt Examples
I'm 5'11" so I'll be using that size for these example weights. For a 20 degree quilt in my length, I only considered top quilts that came in under 20oz. After a long search I narrowed it down to Loco Libre's Operator Ghost Pepper 20 and UGQ's Bandit 20. Both will be sub 18oz. I went with UGQ because they offer a sewn footbox (I'm not a fan of open cinching footboxes). I also like that UGQ will still include a cinching neck and snaps. I've used quilts from UGQ before and have been totally satisfied by them, and I have complete faith in their temperature rating after using them right down to the limit and staying warm. Loco Libre is a fantastic vendor and I'm sure I would have been just as happy if I had gone for the Ghost Pepper. The new Western Mountaineering Astralite is particularly interesting at 17.5oz with a draft collar included.

For many manufacturers, weights this low are off the table, because they use heavier shells or lower fill power down, or come with additional features which cannot be removed. That being said, many of these quilts are great options and will do exactly what you want them to do, they just won't approach being the absolute lightest option. It's important to at least compare the fill weights at the same fill power between two quilts when trying to determine which is lighter, since if a quilt is only lighter because it uses less fill, you'll be sacrificing warmth to get less weight, which is pointless unless you can accept a less effective quilt. Figure out if you like to pull your quilt up over your head or not, and ask the vendor what the absolute shortest length you could go with to meet that need will be. Some manufacturers, like UGQ, offer only preset increments on their ordering form, but will cut your quilt to an exact length if you ask them (I did). I've found extra length outright annoying on a top quilt, and if I don't need that extra length, I certainly don't want to be carrying its weight around with me.

Underquilts
The main point here is to embrace the partial length underquilt. Even if you are prone to cold feet, a full length UQ will typically be less efficient than a reasonably lightweight solution for your feet combined with a partial length. The down in the bottom of the footbox of your top quilt combined with a closed cell or inflatable sit pad in the footbox under your feet, or down booties, will keep your feet toasty. The Phoenix I use is 52" long and covers from over my neck down to my calves. For a 20 degree partial length quilt, look for weights under 16oz. My Phoenix is 14.7oz.

Conclusion
My final system weight, including hammock, tarp, suspension, and insulation is ~3.2lbs. This is firmly in ultralight territory. The main costs you'll be incurring come from the DCF tarp and the premium custom insulation. Hammocks that meet these guidelines will typically be much less expensive than heavier hammocks, so there's money to be saved there. A guide on how to save money while going as light as possible would probably have been of more value to the average user of this sub, but of course it's fun to see how far the envelope can be pushed.

tessiea
09-25-2019, 15:02
Read your post over on Reddit. Great information and very timely as I'm in the process of lightening my load. Thanks for the info


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

cmc4free
09-25-2019, 15:32
Nicely written!

A possible addition (or maybe a correction) for the Insulation>Shell Material section:

0.56oz MEMBRANE 7 (RSBTR): Loco Libre (at least until very recently) was offering this fabric at an upcharge for use on their quilts. If they have stopped, it could be because RSBTR currently only lists Mantis Green in stock. https://ripstopbytheroll.com/products/0-56-oz-membrane-7-ripstop-nylon?variant=12470964518960

Earlier this year, I picked up a 50 degree Operator Series Ghost Pepper TQ with black M7 inner and outer. Great piece of lightweight warm-weather gear. I was initially unsure if they used the 0.56oz M7 or the 0.74oz MTN 7D, as the ordering option just lists "Black 7D," but the normal fabric they use on the Operator Series is 0.67oz Argon, so it wouldn't make sense to pay extra for increasing the weight to use 0.74oz MTN 7D. The fabric used was definitely the M7 and not the MTN 7D. Those 2 fabrics have a noticeably different look and feel. RSBTR does recommend against using MTN 7D as both the inner AND outer layers on a quilt because of reduced air permeability (it has a "microporous PU coating").

I'm not sure exactly which fabric Enlightened Equipment uses on their 7D quilts, but it comes in some interesting colors like the Salmon Orange not found at RSBTR. I'm not sure where they source it, but they do list it as a micro-ripstop at 0.50ozsy. https://support.enlightenedequipment.com/hc/en-us/articles/218159108-Fabrics

erric
09-25-2019, 15:36
You just solved a major mystery on this subject for me, cmc4free. It never made sense the LL said the "7D" would save weight over Argon 67, so I assumed George was talking about it saving weight over the thicker Argon. Good sleulthing on the EE "7D" as well, I'll update the posts.

erric
09-25-2019, 15:46
Read your post over on Reddit. Great information and very timely as I'm in the process of lightening my load. Thanks for the info


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I'm glad I could help!

cmc4free
09-25-2019, 15:49
You just solved a major mystery on this subject for me, cmc4free. It never made sense the LL said the "7D" would save weight over Argon 67, so I assumed George was talking about it saving weight over the thicker Argon. Good sleulthing on the EE "7D" as well, I'll update the posts.

Glad to chip in, and I see you corrected it, but the comment you added: "This fabric is not recommended by RSBTR to be used as both the inner and outer of a quilt because it isn't air permeable enough." applies to the MTN 7D, not the MEMBRANE 7.

The note I mentioned in my previous post can be seen at the bottom of the product description here: https://ripstopbytheroll.com/products/0-74-oz-mtn-7d-ripstop-nylon?variant=3259760476186

And I could be wrong but I don't think the E.E. 7D fabric comes from RSBTR at all. The weight specs don't quite align, and the colors E.E. offers in 7D (Salmon Orange, Graphite, Midnight Blue) don't match with colors found at RSBTR on their 7D fabrics.

erric
09-25-2019, 15:57
Corrected my correction! :lol:

I'm now really curious about what Enlightened Equipment uses. They're a large enough manufacturer that they could be getting something bespoke from RSBTR or another supplier I guess, if not just custom colors.

Just Bill
09-25-2019, 16:07
Glad to chip in, and I see you corrected it, but the comment you added: "This fabric is not recommended by RSBTR to be used as both the inner and outer of a quilt because it isn't air permeable enough." applies to the MTN 7D, not the MEMBRANE 7.

The note I mentioned in my previous post can be seen at the bottom of the product description here: https://ripstopbytheroll.com/products/0-74-oz-mtn-7d-ripstop-nylon?variant=3259760476186

And I could be wrong but I don't think the E.E. 7D fabric comes from RSBTR at all. The weight specs don't quite align, and the colors E.E. offers in 7D (Salmon Orange, Graphite, Midnight Blue) don't match with colors found at RSBTR on their 7D fabrics.

As far as I know- Tim sources his fabric directly from the mill. I recall several posts/discussions from him regarding failed attempts to secure these materials.
That said- I am fairly sure the 'all about our fabrics' page you linked earlier lists the raw weight of the fabric prior to finishing.
The DWR and other coatings create a slightly different finished weight.
Most are familiar with the practice of listing the raw fabric weight such as '1.1 sil-nylon', which is actually closer to 1.25 finished weight for example.
Could be simple rounding or not listing the weight of coating regarding the difference between RBTR's 7d vs Tim's 7d. It's common practice to call out the fabric weight and ignore the coatings.

Overall though- I still like M10 if you balance price in there. Nothing really wrong with Argon, but I think the taffeta finish is better in that weight.

Just Bill
09-25-2019, 16:09
Corrected my correction! :lol:

I'm now really curious about what Enlightened Equipment uses. They're a large enough manufacturer that they could be getting something bespoke from RSBTR or another supplier I guess, if not just custom colors.

I'll have to read through when I get a chance-
But Hyper D 1.0 for fabric is a common enough choice for UL.

For FKT or pocket hammocks- Membrane 10 is an acceptable hammock material. Though I understand why you'd exclude fabrics under an ounce.

I believe a few of the parachute nylons or tablecloth blanks can be bought very close to 1.0 weight too... but that's something I heard here or there. For a guide; doesn't make sense to include stuff that can't easily be purchased from a real vendor IMHO.

erric
09-25-2019, 16:33
As far as I know- Tim sources his fabric directly from the mill. I recall several posts/discussions from him regarding failed attempts to secure these materials.
That said- I am fairly sure the 'all about our fabrics' page you linked earlier lists the raw weight of the fabric prior to finishing.
The DWR and other coatings create a slightly different finished weight.
Most are familiar with the practice of listing the raw fabric weight such as '1.1 sil-nylon', which is actually closer to 1.25 finished weight for example.
Could be simple rounding or not listing the weight of coating regarding the difference between RBTR's 7d vs Tim's 7d. It's common practice to call out the fabric weight and ignore the coatings.

Overall though- I still like M10 if you balance price in there. Nothing really wrong with Argon, but I think the taffeta finish is better in that weight.

I'm with you Bill, my new UGQ has M10 inside and out.

cmc4free
09-25-2019, 18:37
As far as I know- Tim sources his fabric directly from the mill. I recall several posts/discussions from him regarding failed attempts to secure these materials.

JB, I would not be surprised if that's the case. EE's 10D and 20D fabrics also seem to come in several colors that aren't familiar through DWG or RSBTR. Warbonnet is another example of a bigger vendor still bordering on the cottage industry, serving hammock users and ground dwellers alike - and they too seem to have fabrics that aren't offered through these 2 main retail fabric suppliers. Until relatively recently, WB had a pretty limited color selection, so I'd be shocked if Brandon wasn't getting that in bulk straight from the mill.

For next year, I sort of have my eye on a 40 Revelation or Enigma and the 7D is tempting but I'd probably go with the 10D because the ounce saved isn't important to me. For a TQ, I do like the softer feel of the lower denier fabrics and that is more of a factor on a quilt to be used in warm weather, since I wouldn't be wearing long sleeved/legged base layers.


I'm with you Bill, my new UGQ has M10 inside and out.

My first TQ was a 20 Bandit with M10 for both shells, and it's still probably my favorite.

MikekiM
09-26-2019, 05:44
I havent had a chance to read the entire post, I will... Glad I could help you, and really happy you like the hammock.
A quick note on Monolite... I was one of the early adopters of Monolite for hammock use. It is/was a very comfortable fabric that somewhat defied logic. It has very little stretch for a 1.0 fabric and being able to see through it is really neat. My completed DIY UL Hammock in 1.0 Monolite came in at 8 oz on the button, with Dynaglide continuous loops, Lashit structural ridge line, #3 coil zippers half way down the sides to accommodate a removable Half Wit style bug net and a DCF stuff sack. Pretty appealing for the UL'r.
I used it for about twenty nights as my go to and carried on the Laurel Highlands Trails...
Last weekend I sat it in, quite easily I might add, and it ripped straight across the body of the hammock, side to side. Catastrophic failure. I am under 200lbs and absolutely baby my gear.. nothing in my pockets, I didn't bounce it... it just failed.

cmoulder
09-26-2019, 07:19
That's a very good rundown of current go-light options.

No offense to anyone but per MikekiM comments, and as a witness to the event, I would scratch Monolite off the list.

Westie
03-22-2020, 10:08
Hummingbird Hammocks offers a sub-6 oz hammock.

mcpuddleglum
03-23-2020, 20:41
Really great info! Thanks for taking the time to summarize and provide guidance on going lighter. Found your post looking for information on 1.3 Mtn XL and Darien style hammocks. You probably know this but TrailHeadz Hammocks are producing a variety of UL options (Monolite, 1.0 Hyper D and 1.3 Mtn).

Clisbyclark
03-24-2020, 05:54
That's a very good rundown of current go-light options.

No offense to anyone but per MikekiM comments, and as a witness to the event, I would scratch Monolite off the list.

Is Monolite the same as the 1.0 Hammocks that Dutch sells? I have a friend who had a catastrophic failure in a Dutch 1.0 after many, many nights of use even though he was well under the weight limit. I have a 1.0 and that is always in the back of my mind every time I lay down in it!

cmoulder
03-24-2020, 06:23
Is Monolite the same as the 1.0 Hammocks that Dutch sells? I have a friend who had a catastrophic failure in a Dutch 1.0 after many, many nights of use even though he was well under the weight limit. I have a 1.0 and that is always in the back of my mind every time I lay down in it!

Pretty sure Dutch's are all Hexon... I have 2 of 'em, Chameleon and Half-wit. But I could be wrong because his line of hammocks and fabric options is now so expansive that I can't keep up. It's like Tom Clancy books... back in the day I used to say that he could write 'em faster than I could read 'em! :laugh:

I have read of failures of Hexon 1.0, but most are after a lot of use. I had the same thought recently when Monolite was discussed elsewhere and found this thread (https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/129104-Hexon-1-0-Durability) on the topic. My Chameleon has only about 15 nights of use... I bought it while awaiting delivery of my Darien, which at that time was about 6 weeks or so... and the Half-wit has about 40, with zero problems with either. I used the Chameleon just this past Saturday night. I'm always easy on gear, but I do treat those with bit more TLC.

rweb82
03-24-2020, 09:21
Great write-up! Even if fabrics are equal, I think it's worth noting that the Trail Lair will always be heavier than the Darien due to having a zipper on both sides of the hammock- whereas the Darien only has a zipper on one side, which is why it's so lightweight.

That's not to take anything away from the Trail Lair. They are just two different hammocks for different purposes.