PDA

View Full Version : DIY: What fabric should I use and where do I get it?



gabejskyp
05-06-2010, 09:31
So I want to start a DIY hammock. Ed Speer tells me (in his book) that if I am 200-250 lbs. I should use 2.5-3.5 oz. supplex. Here's the skinny: I am 6'9" and hover around 245lbs. - 255lbs. What fabric should I use for my hammock and where can I get it? I have tried the sources in Ed's book but the websites seem rather confusing and I am not sure what would be best.

Thanks for you help!

BER
05-06-2010, 09:43
I am not the expert DIYer and I am sure others will correct me if I am misleading you, but you should be able to use any of the commonly used ripstop nylons (1.1oz/sq yd, 1.7oz, or 1.9oz). All will likely hold without a problem, however, you may have some stretch with 1.1, and lesser amounts with the higher weight fabrics that may affect the flatness of your lay. Often times, using a double layer on the hammock is used to mitigate this. Brandon has a chart listing his recommendations in regards to the WBBB on the http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/blackbirds.php that may be a good reference (see bottom of that link). If you can find lightweight polyester ripstop, it is said to have less stretch, but I have never been able to find any.

For what it's worth, I am currently using Speer 1.9oz/yd ripstop nylon as a single layer and am 6'1", ~200# +/-10. I have not had appreciable stretch with my DIY gathered end hammock.

You can buy fabric from a variety of sources (local fabric stores, sometimes WalMart), Speers, Rockywoods.com, owfinc.com and others. Scott, I think has 30D (ie 1.1oz/yd) fabric on sale now at this linK http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=16957

PapaSmurf
05-06-2010, 10:01
I used to weigh in the neighborhood of 250 (now down to 220 so far!). I was also a little concerned about getting the right fabric, but after building a couple DIY gathered end hammocks, I really don't sweat it anymore. I'm up to 9 or 10 hammocks built and I just grab whatever ripstop nylon or taffeta I find on sale & give it a try. Before I let a hammock go out, I always hang it up and bounce around on it. Even a 1.1oz ripstop will hold me up. Maybe I've been very lucky?

My advise is to find something cheap & give it whirl.

TinaLouise
05-06-2010, 10:19
So I want to start a DIY hammock. Ed Speer tells me (in his book) that if I am 200-250 lbs. I should use 2.5-3.5 oz. supplex. Here's the skinny: I am 6'9" and hover around 245lbs. - 255lbs. What fabric should I use for my hammock and where can I get it?

Thanks for you help!

buy TASLAN, it's interchangable with supplex. I've bought both the taslan and supplex from this site and the taslan is heavier. Both are very nice materials, I personally liked the dusty pink but you probably wont:lol:

http://www.owfinc.com/

look under "fabric" then look under Supplex.

I've always had to call them to put in my order. I've found that sometimes they'll be out of something listed on the web site and sometimes they will have different colors than what they have listed. So figure out what you want, then call.

On a side note, this material makes nice kilts too!!:D

TinaLouise

Kokak
05-06-2010, 15:44
If you have a Joann's Fabrics nearby, this is where my wife buys all of her 1.9 RipStop for the Hammocks she makes.

I'm 5'10" about 235 lbs and all of the single layer hammocks she makes hold my big butt off the ground. The really nice thing about Joann's is they always have a 50% coupon floating around so you can pick up 1.9 RipStop for about 3.50 a yard.

JohnSawyer
05-06-2010, 18:06
Sclittlefield has 1.1 in either green or woodland camo for $2.75/yd. I'm 220 and have a single layer 1.1 hammock. Personally, I'd go double layered ... It opens up a bunch of options.

Length is the next question. I'm 6' and my 11' hammock is ultra-comfortable. I had a 9' hammock, but it was a bit too short.

Ed has 1.9 oz that is reasonably priced, and sells polyester straps cheap... Or go to your local Joanne's as suggested above, and get the rest of the suspension gear from Arrowhead: http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com

Ramblinrev
05-06-2010, 18:19
Strapworks.com super slings are very good for suspension gear as well. 20' straps cut in two gives you two 10' straps.

sclittlefield
05-06-2010, 19:59
Scott, I think has 30D (ie 1.1oz/yd) fabric on sale now at this linK http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=16957

Yes, that sale is still available for HF members. Check that thread and the sale ordering instructions are included. If you get it straight from my website it'll be $0.25/yd more. I recommend the sale price. :)


Sclittlefield has 1.1 in either green or woodland camo for $2.75/yd. I'm 220 and have a single layer 1.1 hammock. Personally, I'd go double layered ... It opens up a bunch of options.

Length is the next question. I'm 6' and my 11' hammock is ultra-comfortable. I had a 9' hammock, but it was a bit too short.

I second both of those - 2 layer is great, both for added safety/longevity, and for the ability to add pads between layers if desired.

And I absolutely love the comfort of my 11' hammock! I'm only 5'10", and can certainly go shorter, but boy that extra foot or two really does something to the feel of it.

gabejskyp
05-27-2010, 09:40
If you have a Joann's Fabrics nearby, this is where my wife buys all of her 1.9 RipStop for the Hammocks she makes.



So the ripstop that Joann stocks is 1.9?

Thanks

WV
05-27-2010, 10:03
Quest outfitters sells the supplex that Ed mentions. I bought some for my first hammock because Kay said Ed uses it. I didn't know it was for his extra strong hammocks. However, I have never regretted my mistake. Supplex is a very comfortable fabric, both in its soft finish and its relatively low stretch. It's windblocking, too.

abrightwell
05-27-2010, 22:36
I'm about 260-265#, slowly bringing that down but for now it is what it is. I currently use an ENO Single or at times a Double, primarily because the rating is 400#. I have been tossing around the idea of building my own hammock sometime soon. I am also a bit of a gram weenie, I am curious which material would be the best to accomplish both of my goals. 1) Support me and 2) not add more weight (preference towards reduction) to my pack than I am already carrying. How can I determine the strength of a given material?

JohnSawyer
05-27-2010, 23:41
So the ripstop that Joann stocks is 1.9?

Thanks

Generally, yes. Some report that they've found Polyeurothane (SP?) coated ripstop, so if the stuff you find has a rubbery layer on it, it's probably not good for a hammock. If it feels like slippery fabric, you're good to go.

I'd get 4 yards, trim a foot (2 at the most) and have at it... You can always use the remaining material to make a stuff sack or two, or even a ridge-line pocket for storing stuff...

Practicing on stuff sacks is a good way to get used to the sewing machine, and get it properly adjusted...

best of luck!

grakker
05-27-2010, 23:46
I bought my fabric at Joann's. When I asked what weight it was, everyone there just looked at me. So I bought enough for a double layer. I'm 6'2" and about 260. It's held fine.

Ramblinrev
05-28-2010, 10:25
I bought my fabric at Joann's. When I asked what weight it was, everyone there just looked at me. So I bought enough for a double layer. I'm 6'2" and about 260. It's held fine.

For the vast majority of the fabric using world the weight of the fabric is an absolutely meaningless statistic. I bring this up to give the clerks in fabric stores the credit they are due. Dressmakers and quilters and clothing makers in general couldn't care less about the weight of the fabric by the yard. I suspect even the commercial outdoor clothing manufacturer build the piece then weigh it and that's how they get the weight. The best thing you can do is to get to know the fabrics you use so you can make your own assessment or buy from the vendors who specialize in the backpacking DIY crowd. But don't expect Joannes or any other fabric shop to care about what the fabric weighs by the yard.

PKT
06-03-2010, 07:22
Why is it that every one uses Ripstop Nylon? I only have two purchased hammocks being
the BlackBird and the Travler but neither looks like Ripstop.
What material is Brandon using?
Might it be the Supplex/Taslan that TinaLouise mentioned? If so why isn't this material mentioned more?

Ramblinrev
06-03-2010, 07:57
Why is it that every one uses Ripstop Nylon? I only have two purchased hammocks being
the BlackBird and the Travler but neither looks like Ripstop.
What material is Brandon using?
Might it be the Supplex/Taslan that TinaLouise mentioned? If so why isn't this material mentioned more?

Ripstop is reasonably easy to get. However, I have used nylon or polyester taffeta and actually prefer that to the ripstop. It may be a tad heavier but I have never done the comparison so I don't know for sure. Taffeta is a weave pattern. To the eye it looks like "regular" fabric. In other words, nothing unique about it. If differs from Oxford cloth in the fineness of the weave, (Taffeta being the finer of the two..) Go into a big box fabric store and ask for taffeta. Once you have seen it you will be able to spot it quite easily in the bargin bins and such.

PKT
06-03-2010, 09:11
Thanks for the info Rev, I had thought Taffeta was a version of ripstop.
Do you know of other nylons or polyesters to look for?

sclittlefield
06-03-2010, 09:35
Why is it that every one uses Ripstop Nylon? I only have two purchased hammocks being
the BlackBird and the Travler but neither looks like Ripstop.
What material is Brandon using?
Might it be the Supplex/Taslan that TinaLouise mentioned? If so why isn't this material mentioned more?

Unless your Warbonnet Hammocks are a custom build with a custom fabric, they should be ripstop. Hold it up to a light so you see through it, you should see a grid pattern.

Ripstop is most often used because it is designed to stop rips (thus, rip-stop). It does a fair job of it, though you can certainly continue a rip. Fabrics w/o the ripstop grids will continue a rip easier.

krugd
06-03-2010, 09:45
Ripstop is most often used because it is designed to stop rips (thus, rip-stop). It does a fair job of it, though you can certainly continue a rip. Fabrics w/o the ripstop grids will continue a rip easier.

Tell me about it! My first hammock was made from WW polyester. Got a rip and dropped me to the ground.:eek: :(:( I'll stick with RS from now on.

PKT
06-03-2010, 09:59
Unless your Warbonnet Hammocks are a custom build with a custom fabric, they should be ripstop. Hold it up to a light so you see through it, you should see a grid pattern.

Ripstop is most often used because it is designed to stop rips (thus, rip-stop). It does a fair job of it, though you can certainly continue a rip. Fabrics w/o the ripstop grids will continue a rip easier.

I had it up this weekend making a topcover that's why this came to mind
I didn't ask for a custom material but I don't see the grid like other ripstops
I did get a leftie.

gabejskyp
11-05-2018, 11:40
Wow. It has been a while since I first posted this. Lots of good info. Thanks, everyone!