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furtigan
01-21-2008, 18:20
I'm starting out ~3/14. This is my spring kit; things will change as the weather warms up. A few of the weights may be a bit off; a couple of things are still coming in the mail or not bought yet. I'm not looking to count grams here, so much as make sure I'm not missing something obvious or taking something that's a waste.


Item Weight (oz)
Shelter & Sleep
Treklite Doublenest 20
JRB NoSniveller incl stuff sack 23
JRB Nest incl stuff sack 21
suspension 2
(ENO bug net added in summer)
CCF sleeping pad, incl wings 20
MacCat deluxe tarp 13
Straps 3
lines 8
stakes 1

Food & water
spork 0.5
Camelbak empty 8
water bottles 2
Jetboil PCS incl fuel 22
Aquamira 2
Bearbag and line 2

Hygeine & Health
Campsuds 2
burt's shampoo bar 2
TP 2
Body glide 4
Bug dope in summer
FA kit 10

poison ivy soap
antibiotic ointment
bandaids
moleskin
razor
iburofin
pepto tabs
claratin
imodium
oxycodone
cough drops
small Ace bandage
safety pins

Misc
Lighter 2
vaselined cotton balls (thanks, cannibal) 2
multitool 2
maps 8
companion/data book 4
Money/credit cards/ID 2
headlamp/batteries 4
camera 5
paperback book 8
notebook & pencils 8
MP3 player 2
Spare batteries 4
Bearbag and line 2
Stuffsacks 1
2 Bandanas 2
JustJeff pack cover 3

Clothes in pack
Stuff sack for clothes 2
spare T shirt 3
2 spare compression shorts 6
spare socks 4
spare sock liners 2
sleeping socks 3
Thermal jammies 12
Balaclava 4
Frogg Toggs (camp clothes over jammies) 16
mesh ballcap (for rain) 3
crocs 6

Gear in Pack weight 281

Pack
Atmos 50 51

Total Base Weight 332

Consumables
Water (2.5 L) 40
Food (32 per day *5 day) 160

Total Pack Weight 532 (33.3 lb)

Worn/carried
Boots 52
Poles 16
Tshirt 6
Insulated top 8
fleece 22
Compression shorts 3
socks 3
sock liners 2
zip-off pants 22
Gloves 2
insulated ear band 2
Sunglasses 2

Skin Out 674 (42 lbs)


A few questions:

-- I haven't bought the Atmos yet -- any thoughts on that vs. a ULA catalyst?

-- I listed wearing an insulated top, a t-shirt, and a fleece -- is that overkill (considering that I could use my PJs & raingear in a real emergency?)

pure_mahem
01-21-2008, 18:29
I'd add a small sewing kit and a fold of some duct Tape. That way you can repair stuff if you have a situation. Maybe a toothbrush and some dental floss. You could always use a willow twigh for that I suppose, make sure you can identify it. I'd still bring the dental floss, you could make it part of the sewing kit by using that instead of thread. JMO!

furtigan
01-21-2008, 18:37
Ah -- forgot to add, I'll be putting duct tape on my poles, and hopefully getting poles with a built-in compass.

Good suggestion on the dental stuff and the needle.

Nest
01-21-2008, 18:50
Ok, a few suggestions. Do you plan on having a JRB and a pad underneath you? Insulation is a person to person thing, but that may be more than you need with that start date. Maybe you could switch the pad out with something like a winshield screen, or insulbrite. Just cruious if you have tried out that setup and how low it has gotten you.

Ok, now the small stuff. All just my opinion and suggestions...

Switch camelback with platypus bladder. It's lighter, and common enough on the trail that patches or replacement peieces like a hose or bite valve can be found.

Campsuds and shampoo bar. I doubt you would end up taking showers out there. Everyone stinks, and no one cares. Worst thing that could happen is you are clean, which makes everyone around you smell really bad. If you stink, you don't notice when others do. Hiking is a dirty activity. If you stress being clean too much you will go crazy. Carry a small bottle of hand sanitizer instead. Just clean your hands after using the privy, and before you handle your food. The rest can be cleaned in town in a shower.

Other than that, you in pack looks good. Right around the weight of mine. I figure if you are in the low 30 lb range then you are fine.

When you hike, you will probably be down to the zip off pants and a t-shirt. I keep my rain jacket handy for when I take breaks to act as a wind jacket. When you hike you are burning so much energy that it's hard to get cold. I get cold easily, and actually broke a small sweat hiking in 30* weather earlier this year. All I was wearing was zip off pants and a thin nylon long sleeve shirt. So I hike in a t-shirt year round now.

headchange4u
01-21-2008, 18:59
I sold my Osprey Aether 70 and got the ULA Catalyst. I love the ULA. It very comfortable and it should save you some weight.

Dutch
01-21-2008, 19:13
I think the list looks good, you listed bear bag and rope twice. Some of the stuff you will probably send home pretty soon. For a sewing kit I took of the strike pad off of rainproof matches and put 2 sizes of needles in it then wrapped some thread around it. I never used the matches but used the needle and thread a couple times. I also like to take super glue, if for nothing else i use it for blisters. I don't use glide anymore I use butt paste. A very small amount will give you so much comfort. Remember gear doesn't take you to Maine, you take the gear to Maine. You will see alot of people regearing a Neels Gap.

Coffee
01-21-2008, 20:27
I couple thoughts. Mainly is it is going to get cold out there when you are starting. Nights in the 20's or lower is not uncommon.

Other than that just be prepared to figure it out as you go. If in doubt carry it. If you don't use it and it isn't emergency/first aid, ditch it.

I will say that most people only carry sleep clothes and wear the same thing hiking everyday. With the expection of socks. But I usually seemed to wear the same socks. I would rather wear wet ones than carry them.

I only carried hand sanitizer for cleaning. I still have the same 2oz thing of camp suds I started with. I think I used it 2 or 3 times when it was really bad and I had a place to swim.

I would make sure you have a water bottle you feel comfortable sleeping with. Also Aquia Mira will freeze if it gets cold enough.

Take-a-knee
01-21-2008, 21:45
I would carry one of these for sleeping with a quilt:

http://www.bozemanmountainworks.com/?do=showproduct&id=90

Also, I've had better luck with Underarmor boxer briefs than compression shorts, the legs fit me snug enough to prevent chaffing, they are lighter and dry MUCH faster, YMMV.

FanaticFringer
01-21-2008, 21:56
Yep it could still get really cold in March down south. I camped on top of Blood Mountain last Easter night and it was 11 F

furtigan
01-21-2008, 21:59
Ok, a few suggestions. Do you plan on having a JRB and a pad underneath you? Insulation is a person to person thing, but that may be more than you need with that start date. Maybe you could switch the pad out with something like a winshield screen, or insulbrite.Yes, I'm planning on the pad and Nest both. I have not been able to test this in appropriate weather b/c of my location. (I will be doing a 4-day shakedown in NC starting next week.)

Does anyone else think this is too much?


Very useful feedback -- keep it coming.

FanaticFringer
01-21-2008, 22:06
Yes, I'm planning on the pad and Nest both. I have not been able to test this in appropriate weather b/c of my location. (I will be doing a 4-day shakedown in NC starting next week.)

Does anyone else think this is too much?


Very useful feedback -- keep it coming.

Not too much. Take both.

neo
01-21-2008, 22:16
I'm starting out ~3/14. This is my spring kit; things will change as the weather warms up. A few of the weights may be a bit off; a couple of things are still coming in the mail or not bought yet. I'm not looking to count grams here, so much as make sure I'm not missing something obvious or taking something that's a waste.


Item Weight (oz)
Shelter & Sleep
Treklite Doublenest 20
JRB NoSniveller incl stuff sack 23
JRB Nest incl stuff sack 21
suspension 2
(ENO bug net added in summer)
CCF sleeping pad, incl wings 20
MacCat deluxe tarp 13
Straps 3
lines 8
stakes 1

Food & water
spork 0.5
Camelbak empty 8
water bottles 2
Jetboil PCS incl fuel 22
Aquamira 2
Bearbag and line 2

Hygeine & Health
Campsuds 2
burt's shampoo bar 2
TP 2
Body glide 4
Bug dope in summer
FA kit 10

poison ivy soap
antibiotic ointment
bandaids
moleskin
razor
iburofin
pepto tabs
claratin
imodium
oxycodone
cough drops
small Ace bandage
safety pins

Misc
Lighter 2
vaselined cotton balls (thanks, cannibal) 2
multitool 2
maps 8
companion/data book 4
Money/credit cards/ID 2
headlamp/batteries 4
camera 5
paperback book 8
notebook & pencils 8
MP3 player 2
Spare batteries 4
Bearbag and line 2
Stuffsacks 1
2 Bandanas 2
JustJeff pack cover 3

Clothes in pack
Stuff sack for clothes 2
spare T shirt 3
2 spare compression shorts 6
spare socks 4
spare sock liners 2
sleeping socks 3
Thermal jammies 12
Balaclava 4
Frogg Toggs (camp clothes over jammies) 16
mesh ballcap (for rain) 3
crocs 6

Gear in Pack weight 281

Pack
Atmos 50 51

Total Base Weight 332

Consumables
Water (2.5 L) 40
Food (32 per day *5 day) 160

Total Pack Weight 532 (33.3 lb)

Worn/carried
Boots 52
Poles 16
Tshirt 6
Insulated top 8
fleece 22
Compression shorts 3
socks 3
sock liners 2
zip-off pants 22
Gloves 2
insulated ear band 2
Sunglasses 2

Skin Out 674 (42 lbs)


A few questions:

-- I haven't bought the Atmos yet -- any thoughts on that vs. a ULA catalyst?

-- I listed wearing an insulated top, a t-shirt, and a fleece -- is that overkill (considering that I could use my PJs & raingear in a real emergency?)

sounds pretty heavy to me dude:cool: neo

Nest
01-21-2008, 22:29
Yes, I'm planning on the pad and Nest both. I have not been able to test this in appropriate weather b/c of my location. (I will be doing a 4-day shakedown in NC starting next week.)

Does anyone else think this is too much?


Very useful feedback -- keep it coming.

Just for me, that would be too much. But I don't live in Florida either. In my opinion, don't skimp on insulation. If you find you don't need it, send it home. If you don't have it and realize you need it, it's too late. I asked if you had tested it because you do live in Florida. So I was curious if you were just being safe. Also, learn from mistakes made by the NOBOs last year. I heard that quite a few sent some cold weather gear home early because it was so warm. Then April came and they froze. So don't use Neel's Gap as a judge of what cold weather gear to send home. It may only be 30* up to that point, and you don't need the pad. Then when you get in the Smokies it could drop to single digits one night and you will wish you didn't send the pad home at Neel's Gap. That's just how I am doing it this year.

Otter1
01-21-2008, 22:45
Is the UQ + Pad too much? For me, yes, for some, no.

If you consider yourself a moderate or warm sleeper, then I would take a thin pad (ie: GossamerGear) to add if needed. It will serve as a frame for your pack, too. Packs much smaller and lighter, too.

BillyBob58
01-21-2008, 22:59
Is your hammock a top loader? If so, and if you have not yet bought all of your gear, have you considered a Speer PeaPod , without a pad, ( or maybe a JRB Katahdin) and a lighter weight top quilt? Unless you need a pad for ground backup, in which case you could carry a 3/4 length ccf pad, or the 10 oz BMW inflatable.

Or, if you are planning on sleeping on the pads most nights anyway, have you considered just adding more pads and going pad only? Either aproach could save you some weight.

furtigan
01-21-2008, 23:44
Is your hammock a top loader? If so, and if you have not yet bought all of your gear, have you considered a Speer PeaPod , without a pad, ( or maybe a JRB Katahdin) and a lighter weight top quilt? Unless you need a pad for ground backup, in which case you could carry a 3/4 length ccf pad, or the 10 oz BMW inflatable.

Or, if you are planning on sleeping on the pads most nights anyway, have you considered just adding more pads and going pad only? Either aproach could save you some weight.The peapod is too constricting for me.

I didn't see the JRB article on the temp rating of their stuff until tonight. If I had, I might have gone with a Katahdin over the Nest. As it is, though, I have already bought my sleep kit and am committed to what I have. Worst-case scenario, I end up going to ground/shelter a few nights, sleeping on the CCF with both quilts over. I can live with that.

Hooch
01-22-2008, 06:18
Ah -- forgot to add, I'll be putting duct tape on my poles.......I'd put the duct tape elsewhere, but definitely not on the poles. While it may be convenient, you have to swing the weight of the poles and the duct tape every step you take. Personally, I wrap several feet of the magic stuff around a tongue depressor or bamboo skewer and cut to just longer than the duct tape is wide. Works for me, hopefully for you too. :D

Coffee
01-22-2008, 08:20
I'd put the duct tape elsewhere, but definitely not on the poles. While it may be convenient, you have to swing the weight of the poles and the duct tape every step you take. Personally, I wrap several feet of the magic stuff around a tongue depressor or bamboo skewer and cut to just longer than the duct tape is wide. Works for me, hopefully for you too. :D

I still have the little bit I started with on my poles. I tried to use it once and it really didn't hold. If I carry it again I will try it on something else not exposed to the weather.

Definitly take the insulation. It doesn't weigh that much. Also don't buy into the super ultra light stuff everyone will be talking about. The right weight is what you can pack comfortably. My base weight was the lightest when I started, and got heavier as I went from there.

Something to think about too is at some hostels there is no mattresses. You will be staying on the floor. A pad is definitly needed on a thru in my opinion. Plus if you roll up on an empty shelter and it is pouring rain it is nice to stay in the dry shelter vs setting up the tarp in the rain.

A thought on your pack is to have plenty of extra room when it is packed. That way when the hunger hits you have the room to carry the extra food. Also if you are cold you can pack out the cheap fleece for a cold snap. I am planning on making a new pack with my old frame. I think the perfect pack for me is 5500 ci, can comfortably carry 50+ lbs, yet only weighs 3.5 lbs. A little on the extreme side for most, but I think it will work under any condition I will be hiking in.

Blade
01-22-2008, 19:09
... This is my spring kit; things will change as the weather warms up. ... I'm not looking to count grams here, so much as make sure I'm not missing something obvious or taking something that's a waste. ...


I say leave it as is! You've obviously put a lot of thought into this list.

I say keep the padding, if you end up needing to hit the ground due to a cold snap it is a backup.

I think all the clothes listed for hiking are a bit overkill, but they may come in handy for camptime.

What about toothbrush/paste/dental floss?

tomsawyer222
01-22-2008, 20:18
I have one of the osprey atmos 65 and i can say that for me it is not comforable with over 25 pounds loaded in it the straps are thin for the breathable ability they have.

Bulldog
01-22-2008, 21:00
I can only say, from Springer to Neels Gap, really look at you gear, and see what you need, might need, and what you'll never need. Keep a mental check list as you go, and see what works well for you. I know that my aborted thru was an awaking toward getting my base weight to 11-12 lbs for three seasons. But remember what works for some, doesn't with others. Also I suggest having the staff at Neels Gap to go through your pack (they do this for free, and can really help). They might be able to point out things you might not think of. Anyway, good luck and happy trails.

Cannibal
01-23-2008, 08:52
Stay warm, be happy. If you're too warm and too heavy, mail stuff home. Either way, we'll be out on the Trail while everybody else is sitting at work thinking about how nice it would be to be out there carrying a heavy pack! :p :D

Coffee
01-23-2008, 09:22
One more thing. What really helped me was comfort and entertainment. Find something that no matter no bad/cold/wet it is you can eat it and everything is all good. I'll give you a hint, mine was coffee.

The Neel's Gap people were great. I talked to one for awhile about my foot problems. I heard they are pretty tough about cutting weight when they go through packs. Some people are all about cutting weight, which does make hiking better. For me a couple extra pounds can make a huge difference in comfort and ease.

Take-a-knee
01-23-2008, 12:54
Yes, I'm planning on the pad and Nest both. I have not been able to test this in appropriate weather b/c of my location. (I will be doing a 4-day shakedown in NC starting next week.)

Does anyone else think this is too much?


Very useful feedback -- keep it coming.

No, I think it is just right, I slept out the other night with my Rock Wren/Nest with minimal clothing (running tights, ss and ls tee shirts, acorn sox, thin PP balaclava). It got down to 22F and I was getting kinda cool, not miserable at all, just a slight chill, and it was more noticeable on the bottom side and I don't think anything was wrong with the Nest's hang as it is kinda hard to screw up hanging it. So, I've decided I need a CCF pad for temps below 25F.

furtigan
01-23-2008, 14:55
One more thing. What really helped me was comfort and entertainment. Find something that no matter no bad/cold/wet it is you can eat it and everything is all good. I'll give you a hint, mine was coffee.I have a coffee press for the jetboil, but I probably won't take it.

My luxury will be my MP3 player. It takes AAAs, so no need to recharge, and has a microSD slot for expandable memory. For $100, I'll have my entire CD collection on the trail with me. :D

Coffee
01-23-2008, 14:59
I have a coffee press for the jetboil, but I probably won't take it.
My luxury will be my MP3 player. It takes AAAs, so no need to recharge, and has a microSD slot for expandable memory. For $100, I'll have my entire CD collection on the trail with me. :D

Noooooooo!:eek:

That's cool. I plan on buying a hand crank radio if I can get one for under 10oz to carry. If it helps I think the press works better if you use it like a screen.

Cannibal
01-23-2008, 15:13
That's cool. I plan on buying a hand crank radio if I can get one for under 10oz to carry.

7 oz. and even has an LED flashlight right here (http://www.rei.com/product/768775). :cool:

Coffee
01-23-2008, 15:20
7 oz. and even has an LED flashlight right here (http://www.rei.com/product/768775). :cool:

Close to what I am looking for. I want one with at least a weather band. I love that with my headphones. Good or bad, it's nice to know what is going on without having to wait on the news. Charging my cellphone wouldn't be a bad option either. What can I say no one can confuse me with a ultralighter.:D

headchange4u
01-23-2008, 15:46
That's cool. I plan on buying a hand crank radio if I can get one for under 10oz to carry. If it helps I think the press works better if you use it like a screen.

I got one of these (http://www.kaitousa.com/KA009R.htm) for Christmas. I don't know the weight, but it's pretty light and has about every bell and whistle you could want.

pure_mahem
01-23-2008, 16:04
I bought one of those because I was jealous that I didn't get one, LOL! I didn't get all the charging adapters though. Sportsman's guide for 40 dollars 45 with shipping if you enter the 5 dollar shipping coupon. Nice little radio in my opinion.

furtigan
01-23-2008, 16:10
Noooooooo!:eek:Yeah, I know, I'm an addict, too. Problem is I don't take it black and powdered creamer sucks. Moreover, when I get up on a cold morning, I don't like to eat breakfast. I'd rather just start walking ASAP. If I had coffee, I'd probably linger around the campsite until 10 am.

headchange4u
01-23-2008, 16:24
Yeah, I know, I'm an addict, too. Problem is I don't take it black and powdered creamer sucks. Moreover, when I get up on a cold morning, I don't like to eat breakfast. I'd rather just start walking ASAP. If I had coffee, I'd probably linger around the campsite until 10 am.

I am an avid coffee drinker and I HATE powdered creamer. Fret not. There is an alternative. It's Nido powdered whole milk, found in your local Walmart in the section with the Mexican foods. It is almost as good as milk or cream in your coffee, plus it high in fat so it makes great hiker staple. I make my coffee using the Mini Minit one cup filters (http://miniminit.com/).

Cannibal
01-23-2008, 16:37
Be a man! Drink it black. :p :D

Nest
01-23-2008, 17:39
Be a man! Drink it black. :p :D

Be a real man! Chew on the coffee grounds as you hike.

headchange4u
01-23-2008, 17:48
Be a real man! Chew on the coffee grounds as you hike.

Chocolate covered espresso beans are one of my favorite hiking snacks.

Coffee
01-23-2008, 18:06
Chocolate covered espresso beans are one of my favorite hiking snacks.

Those are dangerous. Someone gave me some and I though my heart was going to explode. Note to self 4 strong cups of coffee and a lot of those are a little much in one day.

Touch of Grey
01-23-2008, 19:04
Just glanced at this thread and would have to add if it has not already that if you can tolerate tea or even like it, tea bags weigh next to nothing and serve two purposes at that. 1) is something to drink during the day which could be cold or warm (and you can make sun tea while walking), 2) the string from tea bags can be used as dental floss when needed. Another of those wonderful duel use items that takes no extra space and is useful at some point. On another note, the string on tea bags can be used in an emergency as sewing thread until you get to somewhere where you can get the proper thread or repair job done.

Just a thought and my canadian nickels worth!

Touch of Grey

Wintering in Orlando, FL:D

Tobit
01-23-2008, 19:42
But my tea bags don't have strings!! :confused: :confused: waaaaa :(


- JT

Eron
01-23-2008, 20:14
Possibly a third use for tea, first-aid. These articles only cite topical applications on burns, but I could have sworn I read somewhere that it could be used on lacerations also.

Tannic Acid derived from Black Pekoe Tea:

http://www.geocities.com/lebr7/usotaninos.htm
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/407583_7

This one says, "Where tannic acid is not available, strong, lukewarm tea is a good substitute.":

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,762600-2,00.html

Here is some info on antibacterial effects of green tea:

Antibacterial Activity Of The Crude Extract Of Chinese Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis) On Listeria Monocytogenes
http://www.ispub.com/ostia/index.php?xmlFilePath=journals/ijmb/vol2n2/green.xml

There is a ton more info on "the google" for anyone interested in reading further into it.

pure_mahem
01-23-2008, 20:40
Isn't tannic acid the same stuff native americans use to leach out of accorns to make them edible. So you could boil some accorns to make a tannic acid solution also.

headchange4u
01-23-2008, 20:50
furtigan,

have you decided which pack you're gonna get?

slowhike
01-23-2008, 22:30
.while walking), 2) the string from tea bags can be used as dental floss when needed. Another of those wonderful duel use items that takes no extra space and is useful at some point. .Touch of Grey

dental floss... now there's one i've not herd! i'll have to give that a try.
i like a couple cups of hot chi tea when i'm camping.

furtigan
01-23-2008, 22:45
Just glanced at this thread and would have to add if it has not already that if you can tolerate tea or even like it, tea bags weigh next to nothing and serve two purposes at that.That's a darn good idea. You should go to college or something. :D

furtigan
01-23-2008, 22:53
have you decided which pack you're gonna get?I was planning on the Osprey Atmos, but I'm gonna look at Cannibal's ULA Catalyst this weekend.

Next week I'm heading to REI in Atlanta, then to Neel's Gap, and I'll hopefully buy there. If you got a suggestion, speak up ...

pure_mahem
01-23-2008, 23:21
You could also use mint flavored dental floss to flavor your tea, LOL! I think I would do this with a new piece, I really wouldn't want to recycle it for this use, LOL! Someone on WB said you could use dental floss as a fire starter but I haven't tried that to evaluate it yet!

Eron
01-24-2008, 02:09
You could also use mint flavored dental floss to flavor your tea, LOL!

Good one.


Someone on WB said you could use dental floss as a fire starter but I haven't tried that to evaluate it yet!

Just tried to light some with my bic lighter. Didn't burn, just melted. Confirmed it's nylon via the "burn test" here:

http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showpost.php?p=40052&postcount=2

my brand was "equate". Maybe someone knows a brand with cotton inside?

Cannibal
01-24-2008, 08:40
I was planning on the Osprey Atmos, but I'm gonna look at Cannibal's ULA Catalyst this weekend.

Resistance is futile! :D

Be sure to bring ALL your stuff. You and I are pretty similar build and size wise, so you should be able to do a real "fit test" with my pack.

Cannibal
01-24-2008, 08:45
Just tried to light some with my bic lighter. Didn't burn, just melted. Confirmed it's nylon via the "burn test" here:

Man, I thought I was bad about looking for stuff to set on fire!

One thing to remember is most cotton floss is coated in paraffin to make it slide between the teeth and gums easier. That may be why it seemed to melt; I don't know, just a thought.

Coffee
01-24-2008, 10:25
Just stay away from the Gregory Z55, or any of them for that matter. Everyone I knew with one including myself had major issues requiring it to be sent back to the company. They are great about sending you a loner pack and doing all of it for free. But my loner pack also broke, my hiking parterners loner of a different gregory also broke.

Tobit
01-24-2008, 10:55
Heh, I actually just bought a Z55 as it was the only one in any of the stores here that actually fit me. I was thinking of returning it though for different reasons.

- JT

Coffee
01-24-2008, 11:03
Heh, I actually just bought a Z55 as it was the only one in any of the stores here that actually fit me. I was thinking of returning it though for different reasons.

- JT

I wouldn't recommend it with consistant weights over 30lbs. My hipbelt would not stay tight, I had to tighten it every half mile or so. The shoulder strap where it attached to the bottom of the pack had the seam ripping out (they were not surprised by this), one of the compression strap buckles broke. The load lifter straps would also not stay tight.

On my loner the sterum strap broke off where it attaches to the shoulder strap after about 4 miles, the other one broke off a couple weeks later. It also still worked it's way lose at the hipbelt. It's load lifters also worked lose.

On the other hand I will have a slightly used Z55 pack if anyone wants to take it off my hands. I'm still waiting to get my original pack back after 2 months. One of these days I'll call them and see what is going on with it.

Tobit
01-24-2008, 11:07
I rarely go with more than 20 to 25 pounds but sounds like I'll return it anyway now.

- JT

pure_mahem
01-24-2008, 15:59
If you like the pack and it fits correctly. Might I suggest taking it to someone who does custom work and saying this pack fits me I want one that fits the same and then proceed to tell them what type of pack you really want. If your gonna get a custom pack that fits get a custom pack that you'll love. If you don't like the gregory design and you just got it because it fits. Might I also suggest printing off pictures of packs you do like and bring them with you when you do this. After you've done this return the POS and move on. I would get referels from people who have had custom packs made and go with one where there work is quality and they stand behind it. Not POS and they stand behind it. JMO!

Tobit
01-24-2008, 16:09
mahem: That's what I'm doing. I'm in the process of designing my new pack with Ron Rod over at r2 Packs. :D

- JT

Coffee
01-24-2008, 17:33
mahem: That's what I'm doing. I'm in the process of designing my new pack with Ron Rod over at r2 Packs. :D

- JT

If it helps I am planning on making a new pack bag to fit on my REI internal frame. I decided the best pack for me will be: 5500 ci, compression straps to take up the unused space, waterbottle holders on each side that will hold a large nalgene or waterbottle and are make so you can use them while the pack is on, a large mesh pocket on back to hold things wet or used during the day, maybe seperate mesh pockets to hold my campshoes/crocs, a roll top drybag closure, and a hydration sleve in the pack that is sized to fit gatoraid bottles. I will also probibly add hipbelt pockets for camera and snacks.

That seems large to most people, but I think I can do it for under 4lbs. I want a large pack so that if I have to add something mid trip it won't be an issue. Plus I am tired of cramming all my stuff in really small stuff sacks only so I can use a smaller pack. Larger stuff sacks won't compress the down and make it super fast and easy to pack/unpack. Helpful on the cold nights. I am also looking into hikes were water is an issue, so I want to have the ability to carry a lot.

I am thinking either 200 denier pack cloth or something only a little lighter. I will have a pack liner and a pack cover, I am not worried as much about using something waterproof for the fabric.

I am thinking about reinforcing it with a frame or sorts around the bag of nylon webbing. This will add weight, but help out the life and max weight of the pack. I realize now that regaurdless of what my base weight is there is always going to be times where I carry close to 50lbs. Be it a stretch where water is an issue right out of town or I am carrying something fun. I don't want to limit myself with a pack that can't hold it.

PM me if you would like more details, I'm also curious what you have in mind.

Bulldog
01-24-2008, 17:50
As for pack choices, i dont think you can go wrong with ULA. I had a Circut (I had a torso size too big and gave it to my dad) and loved it. Even though it was a size too big, I loved the durability, and features for such a light pack. I know have a SMD Comet, and would recommend it if your really into getting your base weight down to say 10-15 lbs or lower. I love the pad pocket and the removalble aluminium stays. Next time I do a thru, I think right now ill go with a comet or Starlight (if I fell I need the extra volume). Just a Thought. YMMV.

schrochem
01-24-2008, 18:13
Making your own pack is nice!
I have a Mithril that performs well for light loads.
When I take tooo much camera equipment, I'll use my 'custom' external pack.
It's nice to have the breathability on the back and to easily carry the load.
I took a Jansport external frame and sewed my own with dyneema ripstop.
http://home.austin.rr.com/schrochem/Pics/ExternalPack.jpg

Now it has a large netted pocket sewn in on the back. I could make it lighter if I made some lighter shoulder straps and belt.

Take-a-knee
01-24-2008, 22:09
If it helps I am planning on making a new pack bag to fit on my REI internal frame. I decided the best pack for me will be: 5500 ci, compression straps to take up the unused space, waterbottle holders on each side that will hold a large nalgene or waterbottle and are make so you can use them while the pack is on, a large mesh pocket on back to hold things wet or used during the day, maybe seperate mesh pockets to hold my campshoes/crocs, a roll top drybag closure, and a hydration sleve in the pack that is sized to fit gatoraid bottles. I will also probibly add hipbelt pockets for camera and snacks.

That seems large to most people, but I think I can do it for under 4lbs. I want a large pack so that if I have to add something mid trip it won't be an issue. Plus I am tired of cramming all my stuff in really small stuff sacks only so I can use a smaller pack. Larger stuff sacks won't compress the down and make it super fast and easy to pack/unpack. Helpful on the cold nights. I am also looking into hikes were water is an issue, so I want to have the ability to carry a lot.

I am thinking either 200 denier pack cloth or something only a little lighter. I will have a pack liner and a pack cover, I am not worried as much about using something waterproof for the fabric.

I am thinking about reinforcing it with a frame or sorts around the bag of nylon webbing. This will add weight, but help out the life and max weight of the pack. I realize now that regaurdless of what my base weight is there is always going to be times where I carry close to 50lbs. Be it a stretch where water is an issue right out of town or I am carrying something fun. I don't want to limit myself with a pack that can't hold it.

PM me if you would like more details, I'm also curious what you have in mind.

Sounds sort of like a Gearskin?

FanaticFringer
01-24-2008, 22:13
Looks real nice, how much does it weigh?


Making your own pack is nice!
I have a Mithril that performs well for light loads.
When I take tooo much camera equipment, I'll use my 'custom' external pack.
It's nice to have the breathability on the back and to easily carry the load.
I took a Jansport external frame and sewed my own with dyneema ripstop.
http://home.austin.rr.com/schrochem/Pics/ExternalPack.jpg

Now it has a large netted pocket sewn in on the back. I could make it lighter if I made some lighter shoulder straps and belt.

schrochem
01-24-2008, 22:48
I don't really recall. I wanna say around 3.5lbs

Coffee
01-24-2008, 23:06
Sounds sort of like a Gearskin?

Kind of, but with a frame and a complete bag and a drybag closure. The compression straps are only to take up the extra room to keep my gear snug in the pack.

Cannibal
01-25-2008, 08:43
I am also looking into hikes were water is an issue, so I want to have the ability to carry a lot.

Are you thinking PCT next?

pure_mahem
01-25-2008, 21:13
I have an idea for the water issue. I was thinking you could add full length side pockets to your pack in order to carry a 3 litre camel pack on each side. For the drought that's going on in many areas I would think this would work quite well to let you carry 6litres of water. If you don't need that much then don't fill them up completely. If you really want to carry more you could still add the traditional center back camel back too! You could carry 9 Litres in with you. I had another thought to just make them attachable with side release buckles wich would make filling them easier.

Preacha Man
01-25-2008, 21:40
:eek: wow 9 liters is almost 20 pounds of water!!! :eek:

furtigan
01-25-2008, 23:10
Much better idea: when you come to a spring, drink a lot of water. Then you don't need to carry so much.

Even in drought conditions, the AT is not a desert. Anybody who is normally carrying more than 3L is overprepared IMO. 9 is ridiculous.

pure_mahem
01-26-2008, 05:46
AAWWW! It was just an idea. I know a lot of people mentioned water problems this year. So I thought to throw an extreme answer out there.

Coffee
01-27-2008, 19:17
I have an idea for the water issue. I was thinking you could add full length side pockets to your pack in order to carry a 3 litre camel pack on each side. For the drought that's going on in many areas I would think this would work quite well to let you carry 6litres of water. If you don't need that much then don't fill them up completely. If you really want to carry more you could still add the traditional center back camel back too! You could carry 9 Litres in with you. I had another thought to just make them attachable with side release buckles wich would make filling them easier.

That is similar to what I was thinking. A liter and a half bottle on each side. I was looking at the ability to add 2 or 3 gatoraid bottles wide by about 3 high along the back. I want to keep all the water weight along my back.

Coffee
01-27-2008, 19:20
Are you thinking PCT next?

It's top secret.;)


Much better idea: when you come to a spring, drink a lot of water. Then you don't need to carry so much.

Even in drought conditions, the AT is not a desert. Anybody who is normally carrying more than 3L is overprepared IMO. 9 is ridiculous.

I would agree 3 for most conditions is enough. Once I carried 4 for 8 miles due to bad intel and was not needed at all. Another time I carried 3 due to not believing the intel and had to dry camp and didn't get water until the end of the next day.

I was just throwing pack ideas out and not what would be best with the AT.