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Poedog
05-10-2014, 19:02
I just made a blue one for the missus out of window sheer from Walmart, thanks for the direction

jolunder
05-13-2014, 07:32
Hi folks,

I'm about to sew me a net one of these days and got a question to you all. Has anyone ever done the net a bit longer?
Asking because I'm not too shure if my crl will stay short as it is now. Maybe I'll have to make it longer, as I only slept one whole night in the hammock the net will be for, and still am experimenting.
I don't think a longer net would really cause trouble, unless it's going floppy an the walls come touch my skin - any thoughts?

jolunder
05-13-2014, 16:46
Push for opinions! :-)

Syb
05-13-2014, 17:14
Hi folks,

I'm about to sew me a net one of these days and got a question to you all. Has anyone ever done the net a bit longer?
Asking because I'm not too shure if my crl will stay short as it is now. Maybe I'll have to make it longer, as I only slept one whole night in the hammock the net will be for, and still am experimenting.
I don't think a longer net would really cause trouble, unless it's going floppy an the walls come touch my skin - any thoughts?
I made a Fronkey bugnet and added 10" (I think...) to it for a few reasons; 1) I didn't know if I was going to adjust my ridgeline and 2) I didn't want the bugnet to sag toward the center.

grannypat
05-13-2014, 17:14
If you make it longer and the sagging fabric bothers you, you can always tie cord around it to tighten it up.

jolunder
05-13-2014, 23:36
I made a Fronkey bugnet and added 10" (I think...) to it for a few reasons; 1) I didn't know if I was going to adjust my ridgeline and 2) I didn't want the bugnet to sag toward the center.


If you make it longer and the sagging fabric bothers you, you can always tie cord around it to tighten it up.

Thanks, that sounds good.

kayak4water
05-30-2014, 00:52
Thanks. Noob hanger am I--about to spend my first night out in my front yard. DIYer too. I got started after sewing a few of Ray Jardine's kits. I began to think, "this feature on this tarp, pack etc. doesn't suit me. I'm gonna do it my way." Most of my hammock stuff is DIY.
I read, watch videos, make stuff.

I found sheer curtains in black in-store at Walmart. $5 each 59" x 84"

Talox
06-01-2014, 10:58
Just Finished 4 ffronkey style nets using #the NO-SEE-UM MESH from quest outfitters at $2.95 a yard its hard to go wrong.

here they are drying after being treated with Permethrin..

https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/3/6/8/0/1/4_fronkey_bugnets_thumb.jpg (https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=24056)

slbear
06-28-2014, 10:29
this is my first post after reading a lot and finally trying to get ready for a first hammock campout.

I am working on my first DIY hammock project to make a bugnet for my grand trunk double using two walmart sheers (59 x 84). I also just added a make shift ridgeline using one of the suspension ropes that came with the GT hammock. Turned out to be almost exactly 83% of the 10.5' length, and I looped it around the hammock fabric ends, not the biners. Lots of ideas on the forum to optimize this setup, but for a first car campout, this seems like a good start

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Son hanging on a lazy Friday evening

I mention these details and show the picture, because the net seems too short, or is the hammock ridgeline too short, making the hammock hang too low? Maybe the perspective is different in person, but the photos I've seen on the forum (albiet sometimes empty) look like the curve is less, i.e. the hammock is more taut.

If the ridgeline is good as calculated, then I think I need to extend the net, which got me thinking, maybe a piece of ripstop nylon would close the gap, give me more bug protection on the bottom, and even give me a place to stuff in some makeshift insulation or light gear. Someone must have thought of this before. Other than now needing a new entryway, are there problems with this idea?

I was also thinking about modifying the net to add a velcro or zipper on one end, so I could pull it out of the way without getting out (or getting my son out), and then pulling it back into place when needed. Any thoughts on this idea? The end opening and nylon bottom seem to work together, although I realize I can't easily pull it out of the way if the base is stuffed with a woobie or gear.

Maybe a short piece of fabric or additional netting is a better idea? I was planning to sew a PLUQ next, so the extra bug protection through the hammock is probably not needed. It seems like some sort of wind barrier or light insulation will be a minimum requirement even for SoCal camping.

Thanks in advance for any expert advice. I've already learned a lot (I thought) reading the forum. -Slbear

Fourq2
06-29-2014, 01:08
If it's comfortable, it's right. If not then adjustments are called for. The 83% is merely a guide that most people are comfortable at, but there are very many with shorter or longer RLs than that. Having said that, it does indeed look like your RL is shorter than most, giving your hammock a greater sag. It is the length of the RL that is to blame.

Congratulations on a very decent-looking first project :)

Tendertoe
06-29-2014, 20:09
Something is a bit off from the looks of it. As far as length is concerned, you're supposed to have 1.5-2.5 inches per end of the hammock of wiggle room between the ends of the hammock and the end of the bugnetting (hammock ridgeline length x 2 + 6 to 10 inches.

For ease of discussion let's say your hammock ridgeline is 100 inches. That'd be 100 x 2 = 200 + 6 to 10 inches (I usually use 10) would give you 210 total inches for your raw bugnetting fabric. Fold that over would give you 105 inches for your finished net which would give you 2.5 inches per side of wiggle room between your hammock ends and your bugnetting). So it appears your raw bugnetting length was not long enough to accommodate the length of your hammock.

Solution for this would be to purchase or DIY a pair of netting extenders. 2QZQ sells them.

Now for the height problem. You're not supposed to end up with the hammock hanging out of the bottom of the netting.

It appears your hammock is hung with quite a bit of distance between the hammock ridgeline and the bottom of the hammock.

The solution to this would be to either go with it as it is (frankly, I would test this a few times in the backyard on a really buggy evening before trusting it to keep the bugs out in the field) or sew additional panels, like you mention, to the bottom to accommodate being able to get the entirety of the hammock inside the bugnetting.

As far as some additional information, I have a few videos on how I approached things with a few different hammocks and some of the things I learned in the process of making a few of these. Video 3 specifically discusses what you mention of installing Velcro on one side for easy removal. I put this feature on all of the bugnets I make now so I can easily install and remove the netting with all the items in/on my hammock.

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I think it's a really good start. Let us know how things turnout.

slbear
07-05-2014, 15:19
Thanks Fourq2 and Tendertoe,

Part of the problem was solved when I actually measured the Grand Trunk Double. I stretched it over a door and it's a lot closer to 136" of fabric versus the 126" I had assumed from their website, so I lengthened the ridgeline from 104" to 112" and the walmart sheer Fonkey inspired bug net is probably long enough now. That being said, the shorter ridgeline might have been more comfortable. I have to experiment as suggested, and got some amsteel blue from Dutchware to make a whoopie sling rideline to do that more easily.

Great videos from Tendertoe. I do want to add the velcro or omni-tape opening on one end. It just makes sense to me so you can use the bug netting when you need it or push it out of the way when you don't. Anyone know where you can buy longer pieces of omni-tape? (in a store - I'm raring to get it today!) As I looked for it online, it wasn't clear if Velcro makes omni-tape or if there is a certain type of velcro that is close to it. Does it matter what you use for that?

One other note - If I were to do it over, I'd probably buy the netting instead of using sheers. This was a good first project, but I think the bug netting might be more breathable.

Thanks again for all the help,
Slbear

Tendertoe
07-06-2014, 13:13
They only sell omnitape in small lengths locally like I mention in my video.

I looked around at various stores and ended up with a few boxes of 3 foot lengths, if I remember correctly, from a craft store.

If you can wait, I'd recommend getting a single length from DIY gear supply online.

Fuddmaster
07-11-2014, 19:07
I've been wanting to make a bug net because I don't want to pay for the ENO one. I was at Walmart and found a netting for $1.50 a yard. Not sure if it's tulle or noseeum or something else. How can you tell the difference?

IndyFace
07-20-2014, 14:14
i've been looking through DIY bug net posts for a while now but THIS one is by far the best. very detailed where some of the other posts got a little confusing. thank you for taking the time to put this together. i'll be using this to make mine.

slbear
07-23-2014, 17:02
Trip report with DIY bug nets

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First hammock camping trip was a success. My son and I have Grand Trunk single and double hammocks, and my wife helped me make fronkey style bugnets for each. The first using wallyworld sheers (you can hardly see these in the back) and the second using 7 yds of noseeum from Dutch. Both worked well, but I have a couple of comments.

The sheers are easy to sew and strong. The noseeum is lighter and more breathable, and not difficult to sew - just more steps to add the cord channel. I prefer the noseeum.

I added velcro one-wrap on the end of the noseeum net, and provided a way to slide the bugnet out of the way without removing the UQ, sleeping bag or disconnecting the suspension. Tradeoff is it that the net is not as packable/stuffable with the velcro, and the velcro catches slightly on the noseeum when you are trying to line it up perfectly. I did not remove the bugnet except to mess with the DIY PLUQ, but it was handy for that. I wanted a bugnet I could push aside without getting out of the hammock, but now I'm not sure that's as important as I thought. I would have been fine to keep the bugnet on from setup to take down. The views are great from inside. I eventually tied off the ends to keep it from sliding up the end of the hammock.

As an alternative, I'm thinking about sewing the bugnet onto the hammock with a zipper, and wondering how big of a zipper I want. I've seen posts where people are able to completely zip off the net and replace it with a top cover for colder weather. I see the benefit, but I also now realize the bigger the zipper the more it impacts weight and packability. Maybe just one side is enough, and you can flip it over the ridgeline? Do I need to have my ridgeline length dialed in before sewing on a bugnet? If I wanted tie-outs, do I need to do that and remeasure before sewing on the bugnet? I don't even know if I prefer left or right diagonal. I realize this might be a different post, but thought I would ask here first.

Quick trip report - temps were mid-50s to upper 70s at ~7,300' on Mt San Jacinto. Breezy to VERY windy. You can see my attempts at a windblock using a HH Hexfly and a Campmor silnylon square tarp. It was complicated to setup and noisy, but better to have it than not with the wind. In addition to bugnets, we had DIY whoopie ridge-lines, ridge-line organizers and UQs made from a poncho liner and a small nylon/fleece blanket with some extra poly quilt batting between that and the hammock. We were plenty warm with our sleeping bags, even with the wind. There was near zero chance of rain (drought out here so nothing new), so my hammock was not covered at all. Views of the stars and moon/sunrise even through the bugnet were outstanding.

Thanks all for your help here and on other posts to cobble together this hammock camping kit. -Slbear.

snidetripod
07-25-2014, 20:10
I am having a tough time with this one. Is there a way to keep the tulle from rolling in on itself?
I sewed the ridgeline into it and wanted to put in the French hybrid seam from the DIYgear website. I botched the first run and tried to rip the seam out with a ripper. Finally, after two hours of frustration, I just cut it off.
I am sure that my next attempt will be fruitfull, I was trying to rush the job.
I think I may leave one side original length to allow for the second channel so I can slide the bugnet off and on to ease with UQ placement.
All in all, for my first DIY project I think it is going fairly well.
Thanks Fronkey for the tutorial.

snidetripod
07-30-2014, 13:20
Finally finished my bugnet today. I tell you, tulle is kind of a tough fabric for a beginner like me, but I struggled through. Its not beautiful, but it will do the trick. Thanks again for this tutorial.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/07/31/esu9e4yv.jpg

LokoLobo
05-05-2015, 20:20
Awesome! Thanks for the vids and tips. Gonna have to pull the sewing machine out and get busy.

hookten
05-09-2015, 12:28
sweeet thanks

hookten
05-09-2015, 12:30
how fine does the bug net need to be and why?

rbkelley89
05-09-2015, 13:24
looks like im investing in a sewing machine :lol:

flyman8xi2
12-18-2015, 18:03
Hey Fronkey I am a little slow...I am wondering how I get my hammock in and out of the bug net

Fronkey
12-18-2015, 18:22
You put your hammock through the big hole in the bottom and then slip your suspension through the two small holes on each end and there you go. :)

Fronkey

PappyAmos
12-18-2015, 20:29
Made one of these last summer from some of RSBTR's 0.5 oz netting (http://ripstopbytheroll.com/products/0-5-oz-ns50-noseeum-mesh-black). It was initially too big. Had to make it 6" shorter and about 6" shallower (top to bottom.) It weighs less than 5 oz. Find it easy to get in, reach down and cinch the bottom closed. Similarly, I find it easy to reach down and open the bottom, slide it up over my head and then rotate my feet out and get up. I find it easier to use than a zippered bug net.

Regarding the fabric - it was no harder to work with than other no seeum netting. However, the weave is very tight, friend Firebird described it as "like panty hose." As a result, not a lot of air flow - almost a micro climate around you. I will make a new one in the spring with some of the 0.67 netting from RSBTR (http://ripstopbytheroll.com/products/0-67-oz-noseeum-mesh-black). It should be less than an ounce heavier but have better ventilation.

MAD777
12-18-2015, 21:36
I absolutely love that 0.5 noseeum from Ripstop by the roll. It is so light but so easy to work with.

PappyAmos
12-18-2015, 22:04
I absolutely love that 0.5 noseeum from Ripstop by the roll. It is so light but so easy to work with.

Agree 100%. Very fine product.

spicciani
02-04-2016, 16:58
I am excited to make one of these. great instructions!

Pyrogen
04-08-2016, 10:21
I've heard that sewing rip-stop fabric for hammocks and quilts requires a mighty hefty machine. Is this true for Noseeum mesh or can I get away with making a bug net on a newer/lighter machine? Do I need special needles or thread for the bug net?

tightwad
04-08-2016, 15:10
I've heard that sewing rip-stop fabric for hammocks and quilts requires a mighty hefty machine. Is this true for Noseeum mesh or can I get away with making a bug net on a newer/lighter machine? Do I need special needles or thread for the bug net?

Ripstop is about as light of a material as you can imagine...bug net being lighter still. You could easily sew 5 layers of either with a very simple/light machine.

Rinko
04-21-2016, 21:40
Quick question (maybe a dumb one) about the shockcord needed for this project. I see on RBTR they have 1/16" and 1/8" shockcord. Does it matter which I use for this?

johnspenn
04-22-2016, 12:17
If you're a "careful with your gear" type person then the 1/16" is probably fine. If you're more of a bull in a china shop, then go with the 1/8".

I have no personal experience with this particular bugnet, but that's my intuition anyway =)

MAD777
04-22-2016, 12:20
I actually use no shock cord at all. I just leave the bottom open. Several of my hiking companions do the same. No bugs get in. And it's not like there are no bugs; I'm in Florida after all!

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Rinko
04-22-2016, 22:36
I actually use no shock cord at all. I just leave the bottom open. Several of my hiking companions do the same. No bugs get in. And it's not like there are no bugs; I'm in Florida after all!

You're brave!! Bugs always find a way to get at me...and I'm allergic so can take no chances.


If you're a "careful with your gear" type person then the 1/16" is probably fine. If you're more of a bull in a china shop, then go with the 1/8".

Thanks. Looks like 1/8" for me.

infrastellar
06-01-2016, 12:43
thanks for the instructions, i just made mine :)

Double
06-01-2016, 21:07
I use the smallest braided elastic from walmart on my fronkey. You really dont need 1/8 around the bottom IMO.

Aqua-Andy
06-12-2016, 17:52
Thanks for the video tutorial. I am new here and new to hammocking in general. I finished a bug net today with help from my wife, she did all the sewing. The only modification we did was to sew in a channel around the suspension holes so I could run some bungee through with cord locks to cinch it around the line.

MAD777
06-12-2016, 19:28
... The only modification we did was to sew in a channel around the suspension holes so I could run some bungee through with cord locks to cinch it around the line.

Congrats on you & your wife's achievement. The bungee closure on the suspension is a wise item that I include also.

T_Bone
06-21-2016, 10:39
Thanks for your DIY video and the post. It is a great design that I intend to give it a try this month. After making just a hammock I can tell you the mosquitos used campsite as an all you can eat buffet!

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

IL_Bow_Man
06-21-2016, 12:06
In his last video he mentioned Fronkey 2.0...I am patiently/impatiently waiting for this video to see what his modifications are. I was a couple days away from buying material to make mine...now I am in a holding pattern. lol

Itsallstraw
07-18-2016, 21:13
Same!!! Just got an ENO DN... First time hammock, but I am a bug magnet! A net is going to be a must for me... Please please give an update on the modifications! Anybody have a net they are looking to get rid of??

MSUFIJI
04-01-2017, 14:23
I "thought" i'd keep my ENO Guardian when I upgraded my gear to something lighter.

Not after seeing this thread !

Now...... who can make me one of these ? (Yeah, I know its not rocket science but I'd rather support a fellow hanger by contracting it to be done)

Mahalo

DannyII
04-27-2017, 20:28
You can do this!!!

I ordered 7 yards of nano no-see-um from Dutch on Monday. It arrived this afternoon. I was able to knock one of these out tonight in under an hour. It was my second ever, and I made it for my wife's hammock. I also make little channels on both of the ends and added a length of Lash-it and a cord lock to cinch them after installing it on the hammock. Here's the fabric cut pattern I use, doubled over fabric, of course:

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T_Bone
05-11-2017, 19:28
I made mine the same way. Except I made one end a 16 inch opening with drawstring, so I can slide it over my hammock and off to an end in the event that bugs weren't obnoxious.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

Erick
07-12-2018, 20:58
Well, I clearly made an incorrect measurement in there, but it works! Added a shock cord channel on one side so I can shove it all back when I donít need it. I think it was probably more trouble than itís worth. If I were to do this again Iíd simply tie a knot on the end. Also measure my ridgeline correctly.

The tapered shape is great! I was in there for an hour during dusk and no mosquitos made their way in despite the bottom being ďopenĒ.

Itís resting on the ground in the pictures, but picks itself up when cinched. The hammock is also a little low because I was trying out a new suspension knot. Itís a slippery rope.

Thanks a ton for putting the instructions together. I never thought Iíd be able to make a bet myself.

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Ohdogg79
05-30-2020, 13:39
Just made my first Fronkey bugnet and overall think it came out great!

One big issue though... why is it hanging SO LOW below my hammock? This is a WB Traveler (10' hammock, 101" RL) and its hung at proper tension. I used RSBTR .67oz NoSeeUm mesh that is 54" wide. And i followed Fronkey's video instructions. Was Fronkey's netting not as wide of fabric? Does having a longer hammock make that big a difference in how low it hangs? Do I just need to cut off a couple inches from the bottom and maybe bring the angles in a little also? Thanks for any advice!
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MAD777
05-30-2020, 21:19
Just made my first Fronkey bugnet and overall think it came out great!

One big issue though... why is it hanging SO LOW below my hammock? ]

Congrats on the accomplishment!
I always cut 6"-12" off the bottom of my Fronkey style bugnets, depending on how wide the fabric is.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

tstark
05-31-2020, 09:13
Congrats on the accomplishment!
I always cut 6"-12" off the bottom of my Fronkey style bugnets, depending on how wide the fabric is.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

Cutting a little off of the bottom is a good idea. Mine sags the ground slightly, so a 6” trim would do the trick.

When I made my FBN I used Fronkey’s video, but borrowed the idea from a “Fronkey bugnet 2.0” video where they used Omni tape on one end to slide it over my hammock and quilts when I don’t need the net. On my next FBN, I would opt for a light weight zipper and a bigger opening instead of the Omni tape. I would have at least a 3ft long opening. My current opening is about 18” and is a lot of work to slide past my UQ. The Omni tape sticks to my netting.

Overall, I’ve been very happy with my net and the build was easy enough.

Ohdogg79
06-01-2020, 05:48
Cut it down... 12” off the bottom and brought the angles in to the same dimensions based on the instructions. Probably just a shade tighter than would be optimal, but it’s not “too tight” still great. Probably won’t work w/ a puffy winter quilt, but I wouldn’t likely need the bug net then anyway :)

Added some channels & shock cord at the suspension “holes” (upper corners) to allow it to be cinched closed better so all in all, much better than round 1. Final weight for those who care is only 4.2oz :)
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