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mad_angler
09-17-2008, 10:27
I bought a CCS tarp for canoeing the Boundary waters. They are very popular with BW folks.

http://www.cookecustomsewing.com/welcome.htm

Recently, I started hanging. I used my 10x12 CCS tarp. It works great. The tarp is VERY well made. It has rugged tie-out along all 4 sides. It also has a place for a ridge pole and tie-outs on the backside.

The tarps are pretty expensive but I'm very impressed.


I am not affiliated with CCS other than as a satisifed customer...

fin
09-17-2008, 11:12
I have a CCS 11 x 14 that I absolutely love! It is my go to tarp. And you can get a used one at the end of the season from the outfitters in the Ely area. I picked up mine at Piragis.

headchange4u
09-17-2008, 11:14
They sell green sil for 9.00 a yard.

commandokanak
09-17-2008, 13:15
They sell green sil for 9.00 a yard.

Is that cheap...or expensive? In-between?

fin
09-17-2008, 13:36
They sell green sil for 9.00 a yard.

Yeah, their base price is pretty expensive, isn't it? I bought mine used for a lot less.

headchange4u
09-17-2008, 14:25
It's a little high, but not extraordinarily so....

BearBurrito
10-16-2008, 19:48
I have the 10 X 10 and love it. And should I ever have to go to ground (gasp) the multiple tie outs will make doing so easy.:)

slowhike
10-17-2008, 22:08
It says "30 Denier 1.1 oz silicon coated ripstop". Would that be silnylon since it's coated instead of impregnated?

FarStar
10-18-2008, 14:34
Cooke Custom Sewing is, I believe, the only manufacturer of the Whelen lean-to, an ideal camping tarp designed by Col. Townsend Whelen. He would build a long fire in front of the lean-to and sleep parallel to it; he found he could keep warm in his bedroll with the lean-to reflecting the heat of the fire onto him even in the Canadian winter. Of course, the Colonel's lean-to was made of canvas, and could withstand a stray ember much better than can today's silnylon.

Col. Whelen was a pioneer in lightweight packing -- his kit weighed only 12 lb, in days before silnylon and goose down. Of course, he obtained most of his food by hunting.

Unfortunately, his lean-to doesn't seem suited for hammocking, but I bet the Col. would look favorably on today's hammock camping phenomenon.

fin
10-18-2008, 15:50
It says "30 Denier 1.1 oz silicon coated ripstop". Would that be silnylon since it's coated instead of impregnated?

It is definitely sil, not coated. The tarp is the same consistency/feel on both sides of the fabric and is somewhat stiff and has a "plastic-like" feel similar but not quite like a polyethelene tarp, whereas on normal coated nylon, one side is usually smoother than the other and the fabric is a little more flexible/soft. At least that has been my experience with all of the samples of different fabrics I've been ordering, and with what has been sold to me as sil or coated. I guess that wouldn't take into account scoundrels and misrepresentations.

But the CCS tarps are great! Piragis.com has their used ones on sale every year at this time. It's the same green tarp that I have lots of pics of in my gallery, mainly with my DD and my tube sock. http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/9/0/6/tarp_sock_dd_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/%5Burl=http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=3368&c=member&imageuser=906%5D%5Bimg%5Dhttp://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/9/0/6/tarp_sock_dd_thumb.jpg%5B/img%5D%5B/url%5D)

Take-a-knee
10-18-2008, 15:51
Cooke Custom Sewing is, I believe, the only manufacturer of the Whelen lean-to, an ideal camping tarp designed by Col. Townsend Whelen. He would build a long fire in front of the lean-to and sleep parallel to it; he found he could keep warm in his bedroll with the lean-to reflecting the heat of the fire onto him even in the Canadian winter. Of course, the Colonel's lean-to was made of canvas, and could withstand a stray ember much better than can today's silnylon.

Col. Whelen was a pioneer in lightweight packing -- his kit weighed only 12 lb, in days before silnylon and goose down. Of course, he obtained most of his food by hunting.

Unfortunately, his lean-to doesn't seem suited for hammocking, but I bet the Col. would look favorably on today's hammock camping phenomenon.

COL Whelan is/was an icon, he is revered by the shooting community as well as outdoorsmen like the late Bradford Angier.

As for silnylon and embers, I've read they are much more "compatible" than embers/coated nylon. Supposedly an ember will merely burn a tiny hole in the sil, this is easily repaired with a little silnet. Kifaru makes tipis out of sil and sells wood heaters for them.

FarStar
09-13-2009, 04:00
As for silnylon and embers, I've read they are much more "compatible" than embers/coated nylon. Supposedly an ember will merely burn a tiny hole in the sil, this is easily repaired with a little silnet.

Thanks for the information.

cabana
09-20-2009, 16:55
Thanks for the info on this service. I need a custom tarp.

DiverDn
09-21-2009, 17:05
I have a 10x10 cooke that I used several times this summer.

I wish that the corners had some material to re enforce them. I have not had any problems, but worry about really cranking down on it in high winds or storms.

I may go to Midwest Mountaineering during the fall open house and see if Cooke can customize for me.

Merganser
09-21-2009, 17:44
I own two Cooke 10x12 1.1oz silnylon tarps. They have been subjected to some significant winds. No problems with the tarps but one gust did break a 5/8in aluminum pole holding up a corner.

I've used one of them for hanging the my two BWCAW trips I've taken with my hammock and they work just fine for that. More often I use them as camp tarps and frequently, especially if I rig with both of them, I have one right up to the edge of the fire, six feet or so off the ground. I've done this repeatedly and have yet to burn a hole in one. I read physics somewhere on how big a fire brand would have to be to melt a hole in a nylon tarp, assuming it wasn't already hot but I have no idea where. The point was it takes a pretty good size brand to do that, if you keep your fire small you'll have no problem. I haven't.

Dan Cooke's tarps, and other gear, are top notch and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend them to anyone.