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animalcontrol
11-03-2008, 08:16
I'm thinking of converting a rectangle (non-diff cut) TQ into an UQ.

How does one calculate the expected temp range of an UQ? Or, if I know that I can use my TQ safely to 40 F, if I use it as an UQ, what temps should I expect?

I have never even seen an UQ set-up on a hammock :scared:
Is it still considered "thinking outside the box" if you have never seen the box?
Thanks for any input...

BillyBob58
11-03-2008, 15:36
I'm thinking of converting a rectangle (non-diff cut) TQ into an UQ.

How does one calculate the expected temp range of an UQ? Or, if I know that I can use my TQ safely to 40 F, if I use it as an UQ, what temps should I expect?

I have never even seen an UQ set-up on a hammock :scared:
Is it still considered "thinking outside the box" if you have never seen the box?
Thanks for any input...

There are so many variables. In addition to the normal loft to be considered, your UQ is also going to be (likely) more exposed to the wind and wind blown snow or rain than your top quilt. But the main thing is considering a way to get your quilt to just barely contact your back without A: compressing the down or B: without any gaps or openings at the sides and foot end or under your back.

There can be a learning curve to this, and until you master it I would say consider your quilt is going to be good to a much lower temp on top than it will be on bottom. In fact, unless you can successfully solve any gap or foot end/head end/side opening problems, you will likely be cold no matter how thick the quilt, IMO. Not that you can't solve these problems, just that you must be ready for them.

I speak as some one with no experience with traditional down UQs yet. But as some one with mucho experience with Super Shelters, short synthetic UQs ( Warbonnet) and PeaPods, which is an UQ/top quilt combo. Similar to an UQ, but with some significant difs. But in all of these cases, you can't leave the doors open with gaps or openings or you will be cold. And ( except for the WB) if you pull them to tight, you will have no gaps but will compress the insulation, and be cold.

Peter_pan
11-03-2008, 16:36
There are so many variables. In addition to the normal loft to be considered, your UQ is also going to be (likely) more exposed to the wind and wind blown snow or rain than your top quilt. But the main thing is considering a way to get your quilt to just barely contact your back without A: compressing the down or B: without any gaps or openings at the sides and foot end or under your back.

There can be a learning curve to this, and until you master it I would say consider your quilt is going to be good to a much lower temp on top than it will be on bottom. In fact, unless you can successfully solve any gap or foot end/head end/side opening problems, you will likely be cold no matter how thick the quilt, IMO. Not that you can't solve these problems, just that you must be ready for them.

I speak as some one with no experience with traditional down UQs yet. But as some one with mucho experience with Super Shelters, short synthetic UQs ( Warbonnet) and PeaPods, which is an UQ/top quilt combo. Similar to an UQ, but with some significant difs. But in all of these cases, you can't leave the doors open with gaps or openings or you will be cold. And ( except for the WB) if you pull them to tight, you will have no gaps but will compress the insulation, and be cold.

FWIW,To correct the last sentance.....You can also pull the Speer Snug Fit UQ and JRB Mt Washington UQ tight to insure against air gaps and have no compression...

Pan

Mustardman
11-03-2008, 16:49
FWIW,To correct the last sentance.....You can also pull the Speer Snug Fit UQ and JRB Mt Washington UQ tight to insure against air gaps and have no compression...

Pan

Any plans to offer a 3/4 version of the mt washington? :D

Peter_pan
11-03-2008, 19:17
Mustardman,

Undecided on minature UQs....

Pan

Take-a-knee
11-03-2008, 20:43
Mustardman,

Undecided on minature UQs....

Pan

Well, I'm not. When you lay in a Hennessy on the diagonal with a JRB Nest installed with the velcro, no part of your body is laying on one side of the UQ. Why not remove it? That's what I did, I removed the two lower baffles and added the down to the torso baffles (2-5, counting from the top). This Nest was an older version that didn't have the current overstuff, so that down is a lot more useful in it's current location, IMO.

BillyBob58
11-03-2008, 23:30
FWIW,To correct the last sentance.....You can also pull the Speer Snug Fit UQ and JRB Mt Washington UQ tight to insure against air gaps and have no compression...

Pan

Yes, that is correct, sorry for the confusion. But I was actually just referring to the the items I had personal experience with when I said "in all of these cases".