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headchange4u
03-01-2007, 20:30
First off, big thanks to wilsonbmw for disassembling his HH for us to learn from.

I started this thread (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=592) to find out how to incorporated some of the features of a HH in a DIY model. I think the hammock that I made accomplished what I set out to do and here's how I did it.

I was basically trying to make my own version of the HH Ultralight Backpacker Asym. My original HH is very comfortable and fits me well, but there were a few things that were I wanted to change. I wanted a top loading hammock for easier entry and exit. I wanted to be able to reach outside the hammock while I am inside the hammock. I also wanted to be able to go without the top net when the weather permitted.

I started by checking the HH site for dimensions of the fabric for the HH ULBA which was 120" x 60". I used untreated 1.9oz ripstop for the hammock body. I started by roll hemming all four edges of the fabric.

Before I went any further I took the time to lay the hammock body out flat and located the asymmetrical tie out points. You can see in the illustration below, to find the asymm. tie outs you need to find the center of the hammock. The tie out points are located 26" on center. Measure up 13" on one side and 13" down from the center on the opposite side and that will give you the proper tie out locations that will be compatible with the JRB line of quilts or other HH accessories that attach to the side tie outs.

Notice the orientation of the tie outs to the foot end of the hammock. If you are standing at the foot end the "high" tie out is on the right side and the "low" tie out is located on the left side.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/asymtieouts_CROPPED.jpg

Next I sewed the fabric together on each end for 8", basically creating a short tube on each end:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype011.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype013.jpg

I did this because I plan to add a zipper around the lip of the hammock body that will allow me to attach a bug net, or a top cover (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=247&catid=member&imageuser=27) like I use on my HH now, or go completely topless ;) . This will save weight in the long run because I will only have to caryy the top portion I need; netting for buggy summertime, top cover for winter, and topless in the spring and fall (and star gazing).

I realized that my ridge line was going to be a problem because it needed to be located inside the hammock ends otherwise it would interfere with my zipper idea. I made a loop thingy from the Spectra line I cut off my original HH. You will see why did this soon:) .
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype044.jpg

I used rolled the edges from the bottom of the hammock body instead of the standard gathering technique. I must have rolled and whipped this thing 12 times before I got the right "feel". I came up with 5 rolls per side. I made sure to keep the edges as even as possible when rolling. You can see the loop thiny situated in the middle of the hammock, between the top and bottom layer.

Hammock laid out:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype029.jpg

headchange4u
03-01-2007, 20:31
First roll on each side:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype030.jpg
Both sides rolled:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype031.jpg

I then picked up the bundle and whipped the ends.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype033.jpg

I then sewed on side tie outs in a way that I could still add a zipper later. I used 3/4" nylon webbing. I reinforced the tie out points with a heavy Supplex (blue):
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype080.jpg

Here is a pic of the finished hammock (Yeah I used Glo Cord for a ridge line:o ). I will get some pics of it hanging soon. My JRB under quilts fit the hammock perfectly. What was that little loop thingy for? It's what I clip my removable ridge line to (second pic). The loop thingy is locked inside the whipping and this method actually ended up working very well.

The hammock lays differently than any other Hammock I have made. The bottom of the hammock is flat with a pocket that forms on each end for my head and feet. I fell this is due to the roll whip. It definatly has a HH feel and is very comfortable. I also lay flatter in this hammock than in any other I have tried.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype060.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype073-1.jpg


Added 12-12-07:
Making a top cover pattern

I have had a few people ask how I made my top covers for my HH clone. It's not a complicated process, but it is kinda hard to explain. I hope my instructions are clear enough.

I do highly recommend that you make a pattern because it will allow you to easily make different top covers, from different materials, and it's a lot easier to make marks and measurements on the pattern paper than it is to mark the fabric. I used Tyvek to make my pattern. You can get enough Tyvek from Ebay for $5-6 to make this reusable pattern (about 2-3 yards should be enough) .

To begin with, you will need to setup the hammock normally , and stake out the side tie outs. You will only be taking 3 measurements from the hammock:the ridge line measurement (A), the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out (B), and the short side asym measurement (C). The ridge line measurement should be the distance between where the fabric comes together on the foot end to where the fabric comes together on the head end. It is not the actual length of the ridge line.

The first thing that I did was to draw out a rectangle using the ridge line measurement as the height and 2 x the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out as the width of the rectangle (rectangle indicated by red and blue dotted lines). For example, if you had a ridge line measurement of 80" and a the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out is 30" per side, then the rectangle should be 80" tall and 60" wide. The rectangle should be divided in half, lengthwise, by measurement A.

The next thing that you need to do is transfer measurement C to the pattern. Lay your yard stick at the apex point and adjust it so that the distance between the apex and the intersect point matches your measurement C Repeat this process on the opposite end of the the pattern, on the opposite side of the center line.

The final step in making the pattern is to draw in the long asym sides (indicated by the dotted black line). All you have to do is to use a straight edge to make a line from the intersect point to the apex point that is the furthest away.

After you have all your lines drawn, simply cut out the asymmetrically shaped pattern from the rectangle and you now have a reusable top cover pattern.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/TOPCOVERPATTERN.jpg

lvleph
03-01-2007, 20:36
Looking forward to the final result.

tamboo
03-01-2007, 20:53
That loop is a good idea, if you want to have your ridgeline inside the bug netting.
Like you, I made a Hennessey hammock clone using wilsonbmw's pictures (thank you!). It rocks! I have never slept in a HH before, but even my homemade HH is more comfortable than previous, Speer style hammocks. I will post pics as soon as it is finished (had a scary fabric tearing incident earlier), but I wanted to speak up now because I couldn't believe someone had beaten me to the punch. I mean, the pictures have been up for what, a week? Some of you guys are lightning fast gearmakers!

Just Jeff
03-01-2007, 20:54
Great project...looking forward to testing results.

Keep an eye on those ridgeline biners...I don't think they're load-bearing. Might work ok in this application depending on how much stress you put on the ridgeline.

Drop
03-01-2007, 21:15
That looks so good.*

I look forward to seeing how the netting and overcover come out.

Drop
*it's a Headessey ;)

Bulldog
03-01-2007, 21:19
how much does it weigh? Looks like a winner too me!

headchange4u
03-01-2007, 21:41
At this point in the process, basically what you see in the finished pic next to bottom, it weighs 14.2oz including a small sil nylon stuff sack. I'm hoping I can keep it under a pound without any top covers, but I am looking at 100" of zipper on each side of the hammock. I have found that seperating zippers that long are also kinda expensive.

Jeff,
The biners have held fine so far. I have not slept in it but I have laid in it several times. I would like to get something stronger but still light to replace them.

blackbishop351
03-01-2007, 21:50
At this point in the process, basically what you see in the finished pic next to bottom, it weighs 14.2oz including a small sil nylon stuff sack. I'm hoping I can keep it under a pound without any top covers, but I am looking at 100" of zipper on each side of the hammock. I have found that seperating zippers that long are also kinda expensive.

Jeff,
The biners have held fine so far. I have not slept in it but I have laid in it several times. I would like to get something stronger but still light to replace them.

Not bad at all! Nice looking, and right on par with the ULB for weight. Awesome!

As a side note, gee thanks for another project I ma have to try now....and that I wasn't even considering before! :rolleyes:

headchange4u
03-01-2007, 21:59
BB,

You have said that the ULBA is a little short for you. Maybe add an extra foot or so of fabric to the overall length and it may fit you better. I'm about 5'10" so the ULBA fits me fine.

Just Jeff
03-01-2007, 22:00
How about a quick link (http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&[email protected]@@@[email protected]@@@&BV_EngineID=ccfgaddkfkheldhcgelceffdfgidgln.0&MID=9876)? You can probably find one smaller than this one that's still plenty strong.

blackbishop351
03-01-2007, 22:01
BB,

You have said that the ULBA is a little short for you. Maybe add an extra foot or so of fabric to the overall length and it may fit you better. I'm about 5'10" so the ULBA fits me fine.

Yeah...my homemades are 10' long and they work great for me with Jeff's design. If the Hennessy-style gets as flat as you say, though, I could probably go shorter than that on one of those. Somewhere between 10' and the production ULB length.

Coffee
03-01-2007, 23:19
Great looking project. Now I need to do this.

I think a big part of how flat it lays is that the ridgeline atttaches through the whipping. That and it pulled a little tighter resulting in less sag.

I think I am going to have to try this project this weekend.

headchange4u
03-02-2007, 08:49
*it's a Headessey ;)

I like that.

Just Jeff
03-02-2007, 17:24
Go to homedepot.com and search for "quick link"

TeeDee
03-02-2007, 18:12
Simple question - what are the tradeoffs between using a zipper versus velcro for the bug netting?

Here's my initial take on the trade-offs"

Cost: the Velcro would be much cheaper is my guess. I haven't priced zippers in years.

weight: the velcro would be lighter.

ease of use: a. The velcro can be a pain to line up to close, but b. can be opened at any point without having to start at the end like a zipper. Opening at any point could be important if you only wanted a small opening, e.g., to stick your arm out. c. the Velcro would be harder to close properly after getting into the hammock. d. the bug netting could possibly get caught in the zipper and cause damage to the bug netting. e. The bug netting could get hooked by the hook side of the Velcro and possibly damaged in dis-engaging.

maintenance: zippers can jam and lose teeth, not often but Murphy's Law states that it will happen at the most inconvenient time. Velcro is fairly maintenance free - just make sure that the loops are on the hammock body and not the hooks.

Comfort: Velcro backing is fairly rigid and this may irritate.

Other points to consider?

Anybody with experience either way?

Would the new Omni tape be better or easier/better than traditional Velcro (if you can find a source)?

Just Jeff
03-02-2007, 19:09
You can put two sliders on the zipper so you can open it at any point. Not quite as flexible as velcro, but close. (Check the TravelPod (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeGearTravelPod.html) zipper pics if that's not clear.)

Long pieces of velcro are a pain to line up, IMO. Sometimes in the PeaPod I get a little "bubble" on one side and have to realign the whole thing. And that big piece of velcro takes a lot longer to close than a zipper. The velcro would be easier to use with winter gloves on, though...might be a consideration if you're putting on a winter top cover instead of a bug net.

I'm not sure about the weight - I bet a #3 zipper and 1/2" velcro are pretty close in weight. Should be pretty easy to find listed weights for that.

But velcro doesn't jam, doesn't have sliders to break, etc.

Re: velcro vs omni-tape, they both work about the same until the velcro hooks get clogged with lint. Omni-tape doesn't get snag on lint and fleece, but it will stick to itself so unbundling a wadded up bugnet might take an extra minute...no big deal.

IMO, there are as many pros to cons for zippers and velcro in this application, so it just comes down to personal preference. I'd probably choose a zipper if I were doing this.

TeeDee
03-02-2007, 20:17
I just looked at lot closer at the side tie outs on my HH ULBA.

The side tie out is reinforced with a material cut in a triangular shape. I think the material has two purposes:

1. reinforce the tie out, and
2. give the tie a predetermined angular shape.

Simply sewing webbing along the side for tie outs doesn't accomplish the second purpose. Rather, in that case, the angle formed by the hammock body at the tie out would be totally dependent on the position of the stake.

The reinforcing material forces the angle to be the same irregardless of exactly where the stake is positioned, within rather large bounds.

I think the reinforcing material acts somewhat like the structural ridgeline. The ridgeline determines the amount of sag. The reinforcement at the side tie outs is a major factor in determining the exact asymmetrical shape of the hammock.

blackbishop351
03-02-2007, 20:34
I just looked at lot closer at the side tie outs on my HH ULBA.

The side tie out is reinforced with a material cut in a triangular shape. I think the material has two purposes:

1. reinforce the tie out, and
2. give the tie a predetermined angular shape.

Simply sewing webbing along the side for tie outs doesn't accomplish the second purpose. Rather, in that case, the angle formed by the hammock body at the tie out would be totally dependent on the position of the stake.

The reinforcing material forces the angle to be the same irregardless of exactly where the stake is positioned, within rather large bounds.

I think the reinforcing material acts somewhat like the structural ridgeline. The ridgeline determines the amount of sag. The reinforcement at the side tie outs is a major factor in determining the exact asymmetrical shape of the hammock.

Speaking from my experience with my tarps, I have a somewhat different take. I'm not sure the reinforcement patches really have much to do with the shape - if I pull obliquely on the tie-outs on my tarp, it doesn't get as flat. I think the patches might help, but they don't do that much. Of course, the situation with the HH may be very different than that with my tarps, simply due to material differences. But if I had to guess, I'd say that the patches on the HH are mainly there to reinforce the tie-outs, and more importantly to spread out the force on the bugnetting - the same reason I use corner patches on my tarps.

Just Jeff
03-02-2007, 21:21
Unlike your tarp, the reinforcement patch is sewn so that it's a 3D shape. It probably makes some difference...keeps the hammock at the same angle as of the bug net. But with weight, even that patch will deform and won't hold the angle exactly.

headchange4u
03-02-2007, 22:12
I just looked at lot closer at the side tie outs on my HH ULBA.

The side tie out is reinforced with a material cut in a triangular shape. I think the material has two purposes:

1. reinforce the tie out, and
2. give the tie a predetermined angular shape.

Simply sewing webbing along the side for tie outs doesn't accomplish the second purpose. Rather, in that case, the angle formed by the hammock body at the tie out would be totally dependent on the position of the stake.

The reinforcing material forces the angle to be the same irregardless of exactly where the stake is positioned, within rather large bounds.

I think the reinforcing material acts somewhat like the structural ridgeline. The ridgeline determines the amount of sag. The reinforcement at the side tie outs is a major factor in determining the exact asymmetrical shape of the hammock.

I think the reinforcements on the HH are just that, reinforcements. The shape of the netting as a whole is what gives the HH it's really asymm. shape. The hammock I made does have a distinct asymm. shape but adding zip on top portion will further define the shape. Even if the reinforcements were not present on the HH netting you would still get the same shape on the corners because of the shape of the bug netting is cut. We also have to consider that the triangle patches on the corners are just there to give HH a cleaner, more finished look.

I added the Supplex reinforcements to reduce stress on those tie out points, but they way that the webbing is sewn on it gives the side tie out points a very triangular shape when staked out. You can kinda see what I mean from the picture or the tie outs in the first post.

I hope to get some pics of it hanging this weekend and I will take some close-up photos to show you what I mean. Another reason the side tie outs were put on the way that I did is so I can go back and add the zipper to the Supplex side.

I will probably add a little reinforcement to the corners of the top covers I will make also.

I also called Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics and talked to them about zippers. The said that a tooth zipper would be best for this project. I was told that coil zippers are smoother and do better with corners, but they can clog with debris and are much more likely to freeze.

I decided on using a 2-Way separating zipper which mean I can unzip from either end of the hammock. Each side of my hammock is 101" but the longest zipper the have is 100". It's gonna be cutting it close but I think a small patch of Omni tape on each end to help seal everything up. The smallest size they have in a 100" tooth zipper is a #5. I would like to go with a #3 to save weight. The zippers at OWF are about 12.00 each and I am going to need 4 zippers if I am making 2 different top covers. OUCH.

Drop
03-02-2007, 23:18
4 zippers?
Possibly 3 since the zippers completely seperate. If the hammock has one edge with the pulls and one edge teeth only, then you repeat on the covers that would work..perhaps?
hammock P T
netting.. T P
shield.. T P

I hope so, I've actually got out of bed at 4 am, fired up the computer all in an effort to save Headchange4u $12

blackbishop351
03-02-2007, 23:31
4 zippers?
Possibly 3 since the zippers completely seperate. If the hammock has one edge with the pulls and one edge teeth only, then you repeat on the covers that would work..perhaps?
hammock P T
netting.. T P
shield.. T P

I hope so, I've actually got out of bed at 4 am, fired up the computer all in an effort to save Headchange4u $12

One zipper for each side is what I think he's saying, since the longest they have will only cover one side of the hammock. Then two zippers for hammock/bugnet, plus two more (only using one half on each side) for overcover. I think. You're right, it's late :p

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 00:27
Separating zippers have an A and B side, one side with a stop and one side with a large tooth. Same zipper that is on jackets and such. That's why the are premade to length. You can see an illustration on the OWF site (http://www.owfinc.com/Zippers/zippers2.asp).

Each hammock edge will have a side A zipper and the side B will be on the top portion. Since I am going to have 2 different tops, a ripstop nylon and one made from noseeum netting, I will need an extra set of zippers so I can install another side B zipper on the second cover. I will have a set of side A's that won't be used. Is that confusing or what?

I have thought about trying to find a some of those $10 fleece sleeping bags at Big Lots and using the zippers off of them, assuming they are long enough. I will still be paying $10 per zipper, but at least I will have some fleece fabric to use for future projects to boot.

EDIT:
I just measured the zipper on one of my Big Lots $10 fleece sleeping bag and it measures 107". WOOHOO. It is also a 2 way separating zipper with double pull tabs on each zipper. This zipper could also be trimmed on one end. All I would have to do is add new zipper stops and cut off the excess. I hope I can find more bags at Big Lots.

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 00:39
4 zippers?
Possibly 3 since the zippers completely seperate. If the hammock has one edge with the pulls and one edge teeth only, then you repeat on the covers that would work..perhaps?
hammock P T
netting.. T P
shield.. T P

I hope so, I've actually got out of bed at 4 am, fired up the computer all in an effort to save Headchange4u $12


You method may actually be the best route. I don't know why this zipper crap is so confusing to me:o . I may have to only buy 3 fleece sleeping bags.

I appreciate you trying to save me some cash.:cool:

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 00:49
I wanted to throw up a couple of pics of the sleeping bag zipper I may be using. If anyone sees a problem with this zipper let me know.

Zipper joined:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/Zipper007.jpg
Zipper separated. Notice both zippers stay on one side:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/Zipper008.jpg
Trimmable end of zipper:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/Zipper013.jpg

blackbishop351
03-03-2007, 01:17
You method may actually be the best route. I don't know why this zipper crap is so confusing to me:o . I may have to only buy 3 fleece sleeping bags.

I appreciate you trying to save me some cash.:cool:

Hmm....now that I reread, I think he's right. Lets you use both halves of the third zipper.

I was wondering - how are you planning on making both ends separable? I didn't think they made double-pull zippers that separated on both ends.

Just Jeff
03-03-2007, 08:00
Headchange - fleece sleeping bags have zippers that are about 108", cost about $10, you don't have to pay shipping, and you get a huge piece of fleece to play around with. Go to Walmart and look for Coleman brand.

Blackbishop - the zippers can separate at both ends if you want it to look like the sleeping bag zipper in the pic above. But if you turn one of the sliders around so it opens in the middle (like the TravelPod) instead of opening from each end (like the sleeping bag), you're out of luck. It could probably be rigged up but there's a risk of loosing a slider, which is probably why they're not made.

Re: using both sides of the same zipper on the top cover, I think it'll work but you have to be careful. Zippers also have a top side and bottom side, and they won't work if you flip only one side over. (Some do, at least...I just checked my pants zipper and it looks the same.) Or you can call it the inside and outside if that helps you understand.

But if you sew it right it should work. Sew it like Drop said...just make sure it's aligned so the insides/bottoms line up.

stoikurt
03-03-2007, 08:30
I suggest putting the sides with the zipper pulls on the bugnet and overcover. Then when you use the hammock without those the pulls won't bother you and you won't have to carry all the extra weight of them.:rolleyes:

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 10:13
I suggest putting the sides with the zipper pulls on the bugnet and overcover. Then when you use the hammock without those the pulls won't bother you and you won't have to carry all the extra weight of them.:rolleyes:

If I use Drop's method I will have one side with zipper one side without attached to the hammock.

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 10:15
Hmm....now that I reread, I think he's right. Lets you use both halves of the third zipper.

I was wondering - how are you planning on making both ends separable? I didn't think they made double-pull zippers that separated on both ends.

The zippers with only separate at one end but can be opened from either end.

Drop
03-03-2007, 10:22
You method may actually be the best route. I don't know why this zipper crap is so confusing to me:o . I may have to only buy 3 fleece sleeping bags.

I appreciate you trying to save me some cash.:cool:

I'll bet your confused. I was going to post my thoughts earlier last night then I thought I was wrong then right then wrong. I had a few sleepless hours and had to post my thoughts so I could actually sleep. :)

As Jeff says making sure that the zips work together would be the key, I was thinking that after the zips on the hammock it wouldn't be too hard to zip on a matching zip half then do the sewing.

As for missing out on a centre opening the only simple get around I could think of is to attach an shorter centre opening fixed end zipper along a section between the detaching zipper and netting/cover material. A bit of extra weight and cost but because of the shorter length you may find this not too bad. (come to think of it if it was between the zipper and the hammock you'd only need one but you'd always have the weight.)

My other mad sleep deprived thoughts centred around what could the zipping possibilities be, could the netting or cover zipped into tubes (individually or together) be put to some use? Could you fire your undercover and top quilt into the hammock then zip it up and use the hanging straps as a compression system?

Drop

blackbishop351
03-03-2007, 10:44
Could you fire your undercover and top quilt into the hammock then zip it up and use the hanging straps as a compression system?

Drop

I'd rather have something waterproof around my sleep system, rather than using the hammock as a kind of stuff sack. But I have thought about adding zippers or velcro to the sides of my DIY hammock to retain my top quilt and allow for a single-package setup - hammock, top quilt, underquilt. After having packed an actual UQ/sock setup though, I think adding a top quilt into the picture would make the end result way too bulky.

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 10:50
My other mad sleep deprived thoughts centred around what could the zipping possibilities be, could the netting or cover zipped into tubes (individually or together) be put to some use? Could you fire your undercover and top quilt into the hammock then zip it up and use the hanging straps as a compression system?

Drop

That's a great idea. Brilliant! That would mean that I could use the top covers as a zip up hammock skin. It would great if I could get something like that to work.

I think once the zippers are attached each side will be a mirror of the other side, one side seperating at the head and one side seperating at the foot. If this is the case then I won't be able to do what you are talking about. I will probably have to have the zippers and the hammock laid out in front of me before I could say for sure.

Drop
03-03-2007, 10:55
Any thoughts on the addition of an extra centre opening zipper to the mix?

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 11:18
Any thoughts on the addition of an extra centre opening zipper to the mix?

Installing a center zipper would probably be more trouble than it's worth.

Just Jeff
03-03-2007, 11:28
I think he means a stand-alone zipper just under or above the long zipper. Like this:

. ....short zipper..
....L O N G Z I P P E R H E R E......

That would be pretty easy to make.

Drop
03-03-2007, 11:52
Yup as Jeff shows.

On my Vaude tent... No wait, on a friend of mines Vaude tent, there is a simmilar setup for the entrance to the inner tent. There its used with two materials noseeum and traditonal tent inner so you get the choice of using one or the other or both. Not the same situation as for use in a hammock but kind of what got me thinking.

Possibly not too much trouble to do, it's not an essential but could make things a bit more flexible.

I'll add it to my list of things on my dream hammock along with the netting and covers

Coffee
03-03-2007, 11:58
I just ordered the zippers for my next version of a bug bivy. One thing I did was order 2 zipper pulls for one length of zipper. It is not going to be a seperating zipper. The 2 pulls are going to be facing opposite directions on the same length of zipper. That way I can have the opening at any place I want to.

In the end a homemade hammock will only set you back about $5-10. A summer and winter version might be in order.

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 13:20
I've stuck out twice so far. I went to Big Lots and they did not have any fleece sleeping bags. I next went to Walmart and they had the $10 fleece bags with the 2 way serprating zipper but it only had one pull on the zipper instead of 2.
Walmart also have a ploy fill sleeping bag with a "self healing" zipper. The zipper had double pulls but was only a one way separating.

I am going to head into the big city of Lexington and check ****'s Sporting Goods, Target, and Kmart. Wish me luck.

Grinder
03-03-2007, 13:22
headchange4u,

Really nice work. Thanks for the post.

One question: You stated that this hammock lays flatter than any other you have tried. Have you ever tried a different hammock as that was as wide before?

One of my pet theories is that wide enables flat. My first successful hammock was full fabric width (58 inches IIRC). It lies quite flat. I was considering narrower for the next design, but may rethink that decision.

Thanks for sharing your work,

Tom

headchange4u
03-03-2007, 13:30
I have 3 other homemade hammocks and 2 are 60" wide one is 55". They don't lie near as flat as this hammock. Like I said before, I think the roll whip is the reason the hammock lays so flat.

TeeDee
03-03-2007, 17:04
I think the reinforcements on the HH are just that, reinforcements. The shape of the netting as a whole is what gives the HH it's really asymm. shape. The hammock I made does have a distinct asymm. shape but adding zip on top portion will further define the shape. Even if the reinforcements were not present on the HH netting you would still get the same shape on the corners because of the shape of the bug netting is cut. We also have to consider that the triangle patches on the corners are just there to give HH a cleaner, more finished look.


Well I could agree with you about the bug netting determining the shape ..... except ....

If the bug netting is determining the shape, it seems logical to me that the bug netting would then be under stress and pulled tight when I'm actually in the hammock. This is simple not true. The bug netting is hanging loose side to side. From end to end the netting is not as loose, but it is also definitely not pulled tight or even under any stress.

So, if the bug netting determines the shape, then it is totally beyond my comprehension how it can do so without any stress on it.

The hammock material itself is pulled tight, but the bug netting is simply not under any strain at all.

Also, in my experience, the bug netting would simply tear if put under much stress anyway.

So, how do you propose that the bug netting is holding the shape??

blackbishop351
03-03-2007, 17:15
Well I could agree with you about the bug netting determining the shape ..... except ....

If the bug netting is determining the shape, it seems logical to me that the bug netting would then be under stress and pulled tight when I'm actually in the hammock. This is simple not true. The bug netting is hanging loose side to side. From end to end the netting is not as loose, but it is also definitely not pulled tight or even under any stress.

So, if the bug netting determines the shape, then it is totally beyond my comprehension how it can do so without any stress on it.

The hammock material itself is pulled tight, but the bug netting is simply not under any strain at all.

Also, in my experience, the bug netting would simply tear if put under much stress anyway.

So, how do you propose that the bug netting is holding the shape??

When you get all the way diagonal, the bugnet IS under tension. Not a whole lot - it's got some extra material to it - but when your shoulder and knee are all the way into the tie-out corners, the net defines the shape.

Just Jeff
03-03-2007, 17:29
The fleece bags only come with a one-way slider. I had to get an extra slider and put it on there. I salvaged one from a kid's school backpack, but if you don't have any handy they're not very expensive.

TeeDee
03-03-2007, 18:00
When you get all the way diagonal, the bugnet IS under tension. Not a whole lot - it's got some extra material to it - but when your shoulder and knee are all the way into the tie-out corners, the net defines the shape.

Sorry - not on mine. I'm diagonal as far as I can get. My feet at one tie out and my head at the other. As I wrote - no tension at all on the bug net.

Also, do an experiment - take some bug netting and put about 150 lbs tension on it. My experience with bug netting indicates that it will tear long before you get to 150 lbs. In order for the bug netting to hold the shape of the HH asym - it's got to hold the weight of the occupant.

blackbishop351
03-03-2007, 19:22
Sorry - not on mine. I'm diagonal as far as I can get. My feet at one tie out and my head at the other. As I wrote - no tension at all on the bug net.

Also, do an experiment - take some bug netting and put about 150 lbs tension on it. My experience with bug netting indicates that it will tear long before you get to 150 lbs. In order for the bug netting to hold the shape of the HH asym - it's got to hold the weight of the occupant.

Well maybe what I'm noticing is due to my ULB being a bit to short for me. I dunno.

As far as the forces involved, almost all the force from your weight is distributed longitudinally along the body material. I doubt the sides even have 50 lbs. of force in most places, and the bugnet should be comparable.

TeeDee
03-03-2007, 19:40
As far as the forces involved, almost all the force from your weight is distributed longitudinally along the body material. I doubt the sides even have 50 lbs. of force in most places, and the bugnet should be comparable.

In that case, the bug netting cannot be holding the shape of the HH. As I said, laterally, the netting is totally loose - no tension in it whatsoever.

Also, if the bug netting is what determines the shape for the HH, then these attempts at a DIY HH shape without bug netting or with removable bug netting are doomed to failure. Remove the bug netting and lose the shape. Seems like a Quixotic endeavor if you really believe the netting determines the shape.

blackbishop351
03-03-2007, 20:20
In that case, the bug netting cannot be holding the shape of the HH. As I said, laterally, the netting is totally loose - no tension in it whatsoever.

Also, if the bug netting is what determines the shape for the HH, then these attempts at a DIY HH shape without bug netting or with removable bug netting are doomed to failure. Remove the bug netting and lose the shape. Seems like a Quixotic endeavor if you really believe the netting determines the shape.

I didn't say there was NO tension, I said there was LESS tension than what you were describing. But I'm done arguing - I'm not doing a stress analysis on my ULB to prove this to you, and I'm not making one of these anyway. At least not yet.

Since we're nit-picking, the adjective "quixotic" isn't capitalized unless you're using the proper name of Cervantes' character. :D

Coffee
03-04-2007, 00:56
I think the shape is formed by the netting and the tie-outs.

I think the rolling and having the ridgeline through the whipping, loads the hammock material different from the normal speer style. I think the rolled part is taking the force off of the edges. Unlike the Speer style where the edges take a lot of force depending on the way you whipped them. The netting is holding up the edges, hence giving shape to these. The only load you will feel on the netting is the load from the material it is holding up.

The side tie-outs pull out the edges showing a greater shape.

I am going to make mine next week sometime. I still hold to my opinion that the ridgeline though the whipping is as important and the rolling itself. More to come on this after I do one.

lvleph
03-04-2007, 08:54
I will make mine as soon as my supports show up. I was going to make it this weekend, but I am still waiting on my supports.

headchange4u
03-04-2007, 10:53
Well I checked another Big Lots, Target, ****'s, 2 more WalMarts, and a Family Dollar for the fleece sleeping bags with the correct zipper. No of them were exactly right. The closest zipper to what I need was found on some poly fill sleeping bags at Target. The only problem was that one zipper had a single pull and the other zipper was a double pull. These bags are only 9.00 each.

I really wanted to find fleece bags with the correct zipper so that I could use use the fleece. I don't really have a use for a 3lb poly fill bag, let alone 3 of them. I figure I can make a top quilt or just one as a picnic blanket and maybe keep one in my truck.

I'll be heading back to Target this morning.....

lvleph
03-04-2007, 11:23
What about quest outfitters (http://www.questoutfitters.com/zippers.htm#MAKE%20YOUR%20OWN%20ZIPPERS) item #5053?

Just Jeff
03-04-2007, 18:52
My Coleman brand fleece bag only had one pull on the zipper.

But I just got an Ozark Trail brand fleece bag from Walmart for under $10. It has a 106" tooth zipper with two pulls in the standard sleeping bag style. Flip the sliders around and it'll work just like the TravelPod. Only separates on one end if you leave the stops on the end, but you can make it separate if you take the stops off and are careful not to lose a slider.

It also has a drawstring/cordlock at the head end, unlike the Coleman brand.

headchange4u
03-05-2007, 10:44
My Coleman brand fleece bag only had one pull on the zipper.

But I just got an Ozark Trail brand fleece bag from Walmart for under $10. It has a 106" tooth zipper with two pulls in the standard sleeping bag style. Flip the sliders around and it'll work just like the TravelPod. Only separates on one end if you leave the stops on the end, but you can make it separate if you take the stops off and are careful not to lose a slider.

It also has a drawstring/cordlock at the head end, unlike the Coleman brand.

My Big Lots fleece bags have double pulls on both zippers. I now know that this is not the norm. I'm glad to know what the Coleman Bags use. I found some at Target but they were packaged in a cardboard box so I couldn't look at them. It looked like from the pic on the box that the zipper did not go all the way up to the top of the bag. The were also 15.00 as compared to the 10.00 poly fill bags.

I ended up getting the Target brand poly fill sleeping bags. The bag has a single pull zipper AND a double pull. I will just have to postition the zippers so that the double pull zipper is near my head.

I would really liked to have used the fleece bags because I could do a lot more with the fleece material.

wilsonbmw
03-05-2007, 15:18
I know I am behind the times ( I was in Utah doing something else I like to do between trees, snowboarding ), but great job on the HH clone. Did you try the repeated folding method and the rolling method? How much difference do the tie outs make when you have them staked out versus not using them? Post some pics of the hammock in action. I also like the zipper conversation that has ensued. Now I have something else to keep an eye out for at the discount stores, zipper transplant doners.

Drop
03-06-2007, 23:42
Ok, I've been inspired by this project to make my first home made hammock.
I'm visiting my parents so I have access to a sewing machine. Even better I have access to somebody who loves me enough to feel pity when they see me looking at it very confused and offered to do the sewing for me. :)

I've tried to scale it up slightly from the one Headchange4u has done and based it on the dimensions for an Explorer, I've added a foot to the length and increased the tube sewn section from 8" to 1' (seemed like the thing to do)

Now I face the adventure of learning to whip it into an acceptable shape, I haven't attached tie outs since I haven't got my under quilt yet so I'm not sure about where they shall go. I've never seen a Hennessey in real life never mind been in one so I'm not to sure how it should feel.

Really stoked on what I have so far, I also had enough material left to get a set of skins

blackbishop351
03-07-2007, 00:07
Ok, I've been inspired by this project to make my first home made hammock.
I'm visiting my parents so I have access to a sewing machine. Even better I have access to somebody who loves me enough to feel pity when they see me looking at it very confused and offered to do the sewing for me. :)

I've tried to scale it up slightly from the one Headchange4u has done and based it on the dimensions for an Explorer, I've added a foot to the length and increased the tube sewn section from 8" to 1' (seemed like the thing to do)

Now I face the adventure of learning to whip it into an acceptable shape, I haven't attached tie outs since I haven't got my under quilt yet so I'm not sure about where they shall go. I've never seen a Hennessey in real life never mind been in one so I'm not to sure how it should feel.

Really stoked on what I have so far, I also had enough material left to get a set of skins

What are you making the hammock out of? Just wondering since it sounds like you're making the skins out of the same stuff...

Drop
03-07-2007, 10:05
You are right to wonder BB because thats the fly in the ointment it appears to be DWR ripstop nylon, fine for skins but far from ideal for a hammock so I understand.
It beads water, but water will pass through it when I gather it into a balloon and give it a squeeze, It doesnt seem very breathable, it's waxy to the touch, will fray on a cut edge.

I dont tend to sweat much when camping regularly and I slept on it last night (note on not in) in my bed to see if I awoke in a pool of liquid and it passed that test.

I did buy some untreated ripstop but a narrow width and probably too light to trust weight too. It was £0.20 a metre though so I bought the 10 metres or so that was left on the roll, I'm bound to find some use for it.

I have a question about the ridgeline through the whipping. If the knot internally is big enough to stop it pulling through would I be wise to attach my support to the external ends or should I stick to the tried and tested larks head with the whipping stopping it sliding off?

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 10:46
I have a DWR nylon hammock and I have no problem with it being breathable or clammy against my skin.

As far as the internal ridge line, I opted to go for the standard larks head attachment for 2 reasons:

Using the standard attachment method for support lines (larks head) really helps lock everything together, especially the internal loop thingy for the ridge line. Once you lie in the hammock and the lark's head sinches tight I know everything is good to go.

I would not attach your support lines directly to the loop thingy (I gotta come up with a better name) because if you did that it would have a lot of strain and force on the ridge line and not much, if any, on the hammock body. My ridge line is not set up to take that much strain. Even the HH whipps the support lines to the hammock body.

Be sure to post pics when you are done, Drop.

Drop
03-07-2007, 10:56
I shall and thanks for the thoughts on the attachment and DWR.

I'm just getting my head around the whipping as we speak. It appears you do two folds to take it shy of the centreline but do you then fold the two sets back against each other?

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 11:02
That's the way I folded mine. That way the seam for the short tube on each end is situated in the middle, on top. The rolls on the whipping should be on the bottom of the hammock.

I really need to get some pics of it hanging. I tried the other day but the wind was so strong the hammock kept flapping around and I didn't have anyone there to take pics of me in the hammock.

blackbishop351
03-07-2007, 12:08
You are right to wonder BB because thats the fly in the ointment it appears to be DWR ripstop nylon, fine for skins but far from ideal for a hammock so I understand.
It beads water, but water will pass through it when I gather it into a balloon and give it a squeeze, It doesnt seem very breathable, it's waxy to the touch, will fray on a cut edge.

From my experience DWR is much more breathable than it seems, so it should do fine for a hammock. I do tend to sweat quite a bit personally, even in the winter, so I'll likely stay away from it - but others would probably be fine.

lvleph
03-07-2007, 15:19
Speer's fabric is DWR.

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 19:01
I measured and cut a pattern for the top covers on my hammock using Tyvek. It was getting dark but I managed to snap a couple of pics.

Here's the hammock hanging:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/HHCloneHanging012.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/HHCloneHanging009.jpg
A close-up of the side tie out:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/HHCloneHanging003.jpg
A teaser pic with the Tyvek pattern pinned on to check for fit:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/HHCloneHanging007.jpg

Just Jeff
03-07-2007, 19:41
Great looking hammock, headchange. I'm impressed. How many different top covers are you going to make?
1 - Bug net
2 - Ripstop
3 - Camo for neo
4 - Party tarp for those crazy nights alone in the woods...

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 20:09
Mine is a structural ridge line. The loop thingy is just a piece of Spectra that was folded in half (22" long I think) and then 2 knots tied in it; one to create he loop which the ridge line clips to and a really big knot on the other end to keep it from pulling through the whipping. There is a pic in the first post (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showpost.php?p=8828&postcount=1) (second to last pic). The whipping it done between the 2 knots so the loop thingy can't go anywhere.

The loop thingy is basically a cord that goes through the middle of the whipping and is only there for attaching the ridge line. It is only there for the ridge line and it is not designed to take the entire load of someone lying in the hammock.

Yes there is a biner on each end of the hammock that attaches the ridge line so it is removable.

When we talk about a Lark's head we are talking about the standard way the supports are attached on a DIY hammock. You can see what I am talking about at Jeff's site (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeHammock3.html).

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 20:12
Great looking hammock, headchange. I'm impressed. How many different top covers are you going to make?

4 - Party tarp for those crazy nights alone in the woods...

I don't know what you are talking about but it sure sounds like fun.;) :D

I thought I would make a bear repellent cover also. It would have "GO AWAY BEARS!!!" painted on the side in big red letters. I'm sure it would work.:cool:

Just Jeff
03-07-2007, 20:21
Yeah, but you might have to teach them to read first. Might lose a little bit of sleep that first night, but after that you're golden.

headchange4u
03-07-2007, 20:39
You think a picture of Chuck Norris would do it?:)

Just Jeff
03-07-2007, 21:56
Yeah. Even bears know about Chuck. Let me know when you get a tarp with Chuck on it.

Probably shouldn't make a hammock with Chuck on it though. At least I wouldn't let Chuck see you sitting on his face. Might get ugly.

blackbishop351
03-07-2007, 23:18
3. Did you make the ridgeline permanent or did you use a carabiner on one end as I think some people have mentioned that they have done? A detachable ridgeline is one thing I sometimes wished the HH had, but I'm just too much of a coward to cut mine.

That's one thing being a wuss didn't stop me from doing to my HH. Jeff has pix of the mod on my ULB in his report from Hot Springs last fall. Check it out - REALLY easy to do. Takes 5 minutes and makes for SUPER nice lounging.

gibmo
03-09-2007, 17:30
Headchange,
I may be too late on this. I found this source for zippers:

http://www.zipperstop.com/index.htm

Not sure what your needing exactly. They have lengths up to 250" and pretty good prices.

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 19:09
I finished my first cover today. I made one out of netting first. I removed the zipper from the sleeping bags and first I sewed the zipper on the edge of the hammock with a double stitch:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107007.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107016.jpg

I made reusable a pattern for my top cover from Tyvek and used it to cut the netting out. Then I roll hemmed the edges of the netting. and the while the zipper was still zipper together on the hammock body I pinned the netting in place making sure that the corners were positioned perfectly. I wasn't worried about a little extra fabric on the sides, but I wanted the head, foot, and assym. tie outs placement to be perfect so the zipper would line up. After pinning the netting in place I simply unzipped the zipper and and removed the netting and started sewing. If I had any extra/loose fabric in the sides I simply made a small fold to take up the slack:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107027.jpg

Here's a pic of the finished top. I still have about 3-4 " of extra zipper on end that has to be trimmed as soon as I get some zipper stops:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107080.jpg


Detail of everything zipped together:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107056.jpg

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 19:10
This has turned out to be my dream hammock. It's extremely comfortable to lay in and I found out today that I can even lay on my stomach comfortably. I still think that roll roll whip is the key to the way this hammock lays. I creates a flat spot that goes from the shoulder to just past my lower back that cradles me and a pocket on each side for my head ond feet. You can see how the middle is tight in the pics below.

You can enter from either side and lay in any direction; there is no real "head" or "foot". The zippers are mirrors of each other, with a double pull zipper at each end.

Specs:
Hammock body with zipper: 16.1 oz
Netting Top Cover: 3.5oz
2x 15' polyester webbing straps with biners: 8.5oz
Total: 28.1 oz

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107062.jpg

Lay in either direction.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107061.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107050.jpg

Netting fully zipped:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107021.jpg
1/2 of netting unzipped:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107038.jpg
Both sides unzipped:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107040.jpg

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 19:12
Using as a lounger, side tie out un hooked and Walter (dog) checking everthing out:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107070.jpg
My niece Mallery's first time in a hammock:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHProto031107076.jpg

lvleph
03-11-2007, 19:20
That is pretty sweet! How much does it weigh?

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 19:23
Here's Specs


Specs:
Hammock body with zipper: 16.1 oz
Netting Top Cover: 3.5oz
2x 15' polyester webbing straps with biners: 8.5oz
Total: 28.1 oz

slowhike
03-11-2007, 19:36
that's great headchange!
to have a hammock that is that comfortable, that light, & still have full zipper access... that's quite an accomplishment!
and it looks professionally done. great work! ...tim

blackbishop351
03-11-2007, 20:04
Looks great, man! Somebody should email those pix to Tom Hennessy... :p

slowhike
03-11-2007, 20:12
Looks great, man! Somebody should email those pix to Tom Hennessy... :p

yeah, i think that would be a good idea. i'd be curious to see his response<g>.

stoikurt
03-11-2007, 20:41
That looks great! You've become quite an expert at sewing.

Just Jeff
03-11-2007, 21:21
Man, I'm impressed. That's a great project...can't wait to see the nylon top cover.

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 21:24
I have about enough material left to make the top cover from the same 1.9 oz fabric. I started with the netting because I have plenty of it and if I screwed it up I would have extra material to work with. I also only got 2 sleeping bags because that's all they had at the time. I have to pick up another bag for the zipper and then I can make my ripstop top cover.

stoikurt
03-11-2007, 21:35
Are you going to incorporate any vents in the nylon top cover?

headchange4u
03-11-2007, 21:43
Are you going to incorporate any vents in the nylon top cover?

That's the beauty of this hammock. I can unzip the cover a little on each end and that will give me cross vents. I can do that on either side, at either end of the hammock, as large or as small as I need.

sparkysko
03-12-2007, 01:52
I don't get it. What's the point of the nylon cover? The netting alone was enough to make me feel stuffy in my hammock, can't imagine with a nylon cover. Is it supposed to be your rain barrier, privacy barrier?

Coffee
03-12-2007, 01:57
I don't get it. What's the point of the nylon cover? The netting alone was enough to make me feel stuffy in my hammock, can't imagine with a nylon cover. Is it supposed to be your rain barrier, privacy barrier?

It traps in the heat from your body in the cold.

Do a search on a couple threads here about hammock socks and travel pods. It is the same concept minus the blocking the wind underneath.

sparkysko
03-12-2007, 06:08
[QUOTE=hammock engineer;9614]It traps in the heat from your body in the cold.

Ah ha!

I'm thinking of building a similar type of hammock to this, however instead of a load bearing ridgeline, making it non structural, and using a tautline hitch to make the ridgeline taught instead of the carabiners. Also, making it a zhammock style, with the bugnetting sewed onto one side, which can later be tucked into the 'pocket' of the zhammock to move it out of the way. Also, you could put the bugnet under the hammock and zip it up covering the bottom of the hammock when not in use as well, it would double as some place to store junk as well.

As far as zippers, might be able to get old sleeping bags from goodwill, or ask friends. I had 2 or 3 old dirty sleeping bags lying around.

slowhike
03-12-2007, 06:21
that's not a bad idea about storing the netting between the double layers of the hammock sparky

NCPatrick
03-12-2007, 06:49
Great job headchange! Can't wait to see it with the cover too. Did you say the ridgeline is removeable? I'll have to go back and re-read (again).

Bird Dog
03-12-2007, 13:01
Cool project. Great looking sewing. BD

headchange4u
03-12-2007, 13:50
Great job headchange! Can't wait to see it with the cover too. Did you say the ridgeline is removeable? I'll have to go back and re-read (again).

Yes, the ridge line is completely removable.:D

NCPatrick
03-12-2007, 13:54
Very cool. Thanks!

Coffee
03-14-2007, 21:31
I made mine and am trying to get the feel right. I feel a huge difference between having the ridgeline going through the hammock whipping vs the normal larkshead knot.

My problem is with shoulder squeeze. I am finding a tighter hang gives me a really flat hang. But with that I get the squeeze. A looser hang takes away the squeeze, but also takes the flatness away.

I think I need to change something small with the way I am folding the ends.

Any thoughts?

headchange4u
03-14-2007, 21:36
Maybe a different number of folds. I think Drop said he used something like 4 folds instead of the 5 folds I used. My ridge line is probably about 90" from one whipping to the other.

You could do smaller folds thus having more rolls that may give you better incremental adjustments. It took me a little while and several attempts at whipping to get the feel right.

Spock
03-17-2007, 16:02
Headchane4u,
I second JJ's caution about the ridgeline biners. They may have been minimally stressed with the spacing you tested the hammock at, but will carry much more stress if you set up with wider supports. An overlooked feature of the HH is that the ridge line keeps the sag of the hammock consistent over a wide range of support spacings. When supports are too close together, the ridge will sag, but as you space wider, the ridge comes into play to hold the sag of the hammock stable. When spacing is wide, the stress on the ridge line gets pretty stiff. Using the ridge line as part of the hammock structure is a good idea, and any hammock will benefit from it.

I don't use biners at all, but tie the ridge line directly to loops at the ends of my home-made hammocks. I use a sheet bend to secure the webbing lines to the hammock, and sew a loop at the tied end of the webbing. That is where I attach the ridge line. You already have loops sewn to the hammock, and that will work, too.

blackbishop351
03-17-2007, 18:03
Headchane4u,
I second JJ's caution about the ridgeline biners. They may have been minimally stressed with the spacing you tested the hammock at, but will carry much more stress if you set up with wider supports. An overlooked feature of the HH is that the ridge line keeps the sag of the hammock consistent over a wide range of support spacings. When supports are too close together, the ridge will sag, but as you space wider, the ridge comes into play to hold the sag of the hammock stable. When spacing is wide, the stress on the ridge line gets pretty stiff. Using the ridge line as part of the hammock structure is a good idea, and any hammock will benefit from it.

I don't use biners at all, but tie the ridge line directly to loops at the ends of my home-made hammocks. I use a sheet bend to secure the webbing lines to the hammock, and sew a loop at the tied end of the webbing. That is where I attach the ridge line. You already have loops sewn to the hammock, and that will work, too.

I've got a small unrated/light rated biner in the ridgeline of my HH ULB, and I've hung it in just about every imaginable configuration that way. Hanging from wider-spaced trees definitely puts more tension on the ridgeline, but I haven't had any problems at all.

headchange4u
03-18-2007, 12:28
I do plan on changing those biners at some point, but I have to agree with BB. I have sent a few hours lounging in this hammock and there have been no signs of stress on these biners. They still open and close perfectly and they do not stretch or give when I am in the hammock. I still don't trust them but until I find a light weight alternative they will have to do.

Drop
03-18-2007, 19:50
If the structural ridge line fails doesn't the hammock revert back to a standard ridge lineless hammock? What I mean is it wont be a back to ground type deal. ('though I could see the slight potential for having a bit of biner being catapulted the length of the hammock ;) ).

As I understand it the ridge line actually tends to compress when the hammock is loaded as the weight is transferred through the hammock and into the support lines.

All that being said, I use climbing rated biners, I'd like to try some of those mini biners that came up a while ago* or potentially attach the ridge line to the loop thingys with some kind of removable knot.

Drop
*From the company that doesn't seem to offer overseas service or replies to emails

Just Jeff
03-18-2007, 20:48
Yeah - it'd be pretty scary for a second or two but I doubt it would put you on the ground.

But it might make the hammock lay longer as it hangs...hope the tarp is long enough. That actually makes a difference for some of my setups...the hammock only fits under the tarp when the ridgeline is on.

headchange4u
03-19-2007, 08:13
I got severely p**sed off this weekend. I went back to Target to get another bag so that I could finish my rip stop cover for my HH. I noticed that they had the camo version of sleeping bag I had used the first time on sale for 9.99. I though it's not fleece but at least it's camo instead of bright green of the last bags I bought. So I get home and do a qucik test of the zipper while it was attached to the sleeping bag and it zipped up fine. I only zipped up a foot or so.

So I remove one side of the zipper and went over and zipped it on the hammock so I could line up and pin the top cover. Once fully zipped the zipper was about 8" shorter than it should have been. I unzipped it and measured it and it was 2" inches shorter than the one I had on the hammock. I checked the teeth of the zipper and they lined up for the first couple of inches and then they didn't line up at all. CRAP.

Now I have to take a sleeping bag back to Target and explain why one side of the zipper is no longer attached to the bag. "I swear I climbed in the bag and the zipper just fell off. Can I get another one? The green one this time."

slowhike
03-19-2007, 22:00
.
Drop
*From the company that doesn't seem to offer overseas service or replies to emails

which company was that?

Drop
03-19-2007, 22:41
Trek light hammocks, great looking 'biners but I guess a paltry $10 or $20 order is not worth their bother :(
Being charitable I'll go with the email not reaching them (even if it was submitted via the website form)

slowhike
03-20-2007, 05:32
Trek light hammocks, great looking 'biners but I guess a paltry $10 or $20 order is not worth their bother :(
Being charitable I'll go with the email not reaching them (even if it was submitted via the website form)

both jacks r better & , backpackinglight.com have well made mini biners you could take a look at.

Drop
03-20-2007, 21:00
both jacks r better & , backpackinglight.com have well made mini biners you could take a look at.

Thanks Slowhike unfortunately the BPlight ones (ursalight) are only rated to 150-200lbs rather than the 1100lbs treklight claim. I'm assuming the JRB ones are accessory types as well.

rptinker
03-27-2007, 21:00
hi headchange4u!

Nice hammock.:) Gonna make one too! how many inches is the side tie-out from the hammock end? is it centered or is it an asym type?

headchange4u
03-28-2007, 08:51
hi headchange4u!

Nice hammock.:) Gonna make one too! how many inches is the side tie-out from the hammock end? is it centered or is it an asym type?

Hey rptinker,

Welcome to the forum.

My side tie outs are asym. Unfortunatly I don't have the measurement. What I did was to lay the hammock fabric out flat on the floor after hemming the edges and before sewing the tubes on each end. I next took my Jacks R Better No Sniveller under quilt and centered it on the fabric. I used the asym attachment loops on the JRB quilt to find the location of the side tie outs on the hammock. I was making sure that my JRB quilts would work well on this hammock. :)

rptinker
03-28-2007, 20:42
Thanks headchange4u! I sewed the side tie outs last night without wating for your reply. The bug got me! I couldnt sleep without finishing this ***** hammock! I went to Tom hennesy's website instead and looked for specs and found nothing specific except for words like "just above the knee or just about your shoulder." So i did the most logical thing, i tied the hammock layed on it and marked the places were my shoulder and knee touched the hem. Voila! the result looked and felt good. In fact i slept on the hammock last night (minus the bugnet but with plenty of bug lotion) and it was roomy and flat compared to my speer/claytor clone. i will sew the zipper and experiment with the bugnet this pm. thanks for the tip

ps- my hammock end was fold/gathered hennesy asym style but with a difference. After gathering the ends it was folded and whipped like Jeff's. The support line goes through the fold and attached to the tree like claytors or crzy cribs. No need for the loop thingy because you can tie the ridgeline with a clove hitch and half hitches directly to the hammock support. the only downside is that you cant sew the zipper on like the hh. Im still experimenting but i think i have some ideas to try this pm. thanks!

nickelanddime
04-02-2007, 22:22
Hey, I just wanted to say thanks. In a little over an hour and for a little less than $30 I made my first hammock and it beats any of the others I've slept in hands down. I took your ridgeline and the way you sewed the ends and combined it with hammockengineers parallelogram shaped material idea. I didn't even bother with the side tie outs or the ridgeline yet, just ran outside, set it up and flopped down. Amazing.

Coffee
04-03-2007, 00:10
Hey, I just wanted to say thanks. In a little over an hour and for a little less than $30 I made my first hammock and it beats any of the others I've slept in hands down. I took your ridgeline and the way you sewed the ends and combined it with hammockengineers parallelogram shaped material idea. I didn't even bother with the side tie outs or the ridgeline yet, just ran outside, set it up and flopped down. Amazing.

You got to post pics of it. I'm curious to see how the ends and the asym shape came out.

funbun
04-03-2007, 01:51
Looks great, man! Somebody should email those pix to Tom Hennessy... :p

NOOO! He might send the Zombie Army of Doom and inadvertently start World War Z :(

funbun
04-03-2007, 01:54
Seriously, can these HH clones sit as well as a Speer? I often like to sit in my hammock. It seems the ridgeline would interfere while sitting.

NCPatrick
04-03-2007, 06:44
That's why these clones have a removeable ridgeline, so you can remove it if it becomes uncomfortable.

funbun
04-03-2007, 10:18
So are you guys using load bearing biners for the ridgeline or or what? I should be getting my fabric in today. I just might try this HH clone deal

headchange4u
04-03-2007, 10:28
So are you guys using load bearing biners for the ridgeline or or what? I should be getting my fabric in today. I just might try this HH clone deal

I am using cheapo Coleman mini biners that I got from WalMart at the moment. There has been some concern on whether they are strong enough, but they are working fine so far. As I said before I will be replacing them when I find a stronger light weight alternative.

There is a pic of me lounging (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/?action=view&current=HHProto031107070.jpg) in the hammock. It sits great by just unattaching the side tie out, much like a HH, and if the ridge line bothers me I can undo it also. Because the side of this hammock are looser than a Speer type I think it sits better than my Speers.

funbun
04-03-2007, 11:01
I am using cheapo Coleman mini biners that I got from WalMart at the moment. There has been some concern on whether they are strong enough, but they are working fine so far. As I said before I will be replacing them when I find a stronger light weight alternative.

There is a pic of me lounging (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/?action=view&current=HHProto031107070.jpg) in the hammock. It sits great by just unattaching the side tie out, much like a HH, and if the ridge line bothers me I can undo it also. Because the side of this hammock are looser than a Speer type I think it sits better than my Speers.


Cool thanks, I think I'll be making a HH clone also, lol.

lvleph
04-04-2007, 11:50
Do you think the netting could be attached using Velcro instead of a zipper? I wonder if the weight savings would even be worth the effort of attaching the bug netting every time you get in. I could have a zipper on just one side. This way I can roll it to one side. Hmmmm.

Coffee
04-04-2007, 12:06
I wonder if the velcro would make a good enough seal. Any force on the netting could pull it loose letting the crawlys in.

lvleph
04-04-2007, 12:10
That is what I was asking in fact. I would have already done it if I was confident it would work.

blackbishop351
04-04-2007, 12:47
Velcro isn't really much of a weight savings over a smallish zipper, either. And much more of a pain to use IMO.

headchange4u
04-04-2007, 12:48
Do you think the netting could be attached using Velcro instead of a zipper? I wonder if the weight savings would even be worth the effort of attaching the bug netting every time you get in. I could have a zipper on just one side. This way I can roll it to one side. Hmmmm.

I'm sure velcro would work. I had considered that when making mine but opted to go with a zipper mainly to avoid the hassle of lining up velcro to close the hammock or attach a cover. There is not much tension at all on the netting and I don't think you would have a problem with it pulling apart.

I think I said the zipper weighed 1.9oz each, and they still need to be trimmed down for an exact fit, so they added about 3.8oz (probably about 3.5oz after trimming 9" off each zipper). If you knew what velcro weighed you could estimate any weight saving. On my hammock each side was 101" so that would be 4 x 101" pieces of velcro or 2 x 101" pieces if you only wanted to do one side and have a roll back top. I wanted a completely removable top on my so I could make different cover or save the weight of bringing no top at all.

lvleph
04-04-2007, 14:05
A 1/2" velcro including hook and loop weighs in at 0.09oz/ft (source=www.thru-hiker.com), so the weight for 101" would be
0.09*101/12=0.76oz.
hmmmm, I am still wondering if that is worth the 1oz I would save for one side.

I still wonder if I should have it completely detachable or just one sided.

EDIT: Also, do you think the loop should go on the outside or inside of the hammock?

NCPatrick
04-04-2007, 14:07
Depends on whether you think you can heft all that extra weight.

lvleph
04-04-2007, 14:15
Depends on whether you think you can heft all that extra weight.

lol, It did cross my mind.

headchange4u
04-04-2007, 17:03
Or put them on outside edge of the hammock and you won't touch them at all.

peanuts
04-04-2007, 17:47
velcro works very well, thats how i attach my bug net to my eno hammock. but you have to remember that you also have to put velcro at the ends of the bugnet that goes around the hangingstraps or cord. make sense?

lvleph
04-04-2007, 17:50
At the end of my hammock there is a tube just like any HH, and so the velcro would turn at that point. I think my biggest concern now is ease of attaching and detaching the bug netting. It certainly would be easier with a zipper.

peanuts
04-04-2007, 17:52
i find it easy to do and undo. it does take a wee bit to get used to it tho.

lvleph
04-04-2007, 18:17
Okay, I think I will work everything out. I hope I can finish it for SEHHA and then show it off.

nickelsanddimes
04-07-2007, 23:01
You got to post pics of it. I'm curious to see how the ends and the asym shape came out.

Sorry about the delay/quality of the pic's. Like I said I used your parallelogram and headchange4u's instructions. Interesting note, if I make the ridgeline really long and tighten it up it will actually negative banana(for lack of a better term) but that feels weird and I wind up sliding into awkward positions.

I'm 5'10" and 170lbs and the ridgeline is currently 92". If I had sewn more than the 8" on either end I think it would have cupped the edges up a little more than I like. Anyway, thanks again guys... AT in 10 days!

Just Jeff
04-08-2007, 06:22
That first pic is a great shot of how flat you can get in a hammock. It's basically a straight line from your shoulder to your feet, and it looks like you were holding your head up (instead of the hammock forcing you to keep it at that angle).

nickelsanddimes
04-08-2007, 07:36
Yeah, I had a buckeye husk stuck to my ankle and I was trying to kick it out without sticking it in the nylon. While I'm thinking about it, why does everyone use nylon for their hammocks? Polyester's strength isn't as affected by moisture and I'm pretty sure it doesn't stretch anywhere close to as much(and I could have gotten some thin stuff at wally world for $4 less per yard):o

Just Jeff
04-08-2007, 08:26
Mainly b/c Walmart sells ripstop nylon at $1/yd. Used to, anyway.

Coffee
04-08-2007, 09:20
Mainly b/c Walmart sells ripstop nylon at $1/yd. Used to, anyway.

That's my reason too. I got some taffeta that works well, but it's life span is questionable.

Cool pics and hammock. I finally found a good gathering that works for me. Not the HH way though. I do like a long ridgeline. I am 6'4" and have it at 10' long.

TeeDee
04-08-2007, 18:23
That's my reason too. I got some taffeta that works well, but it's life span is questionable.

Hennessy uses taffeta on some of their hammocks - haven't anything contrary about life span.

Frolicking Dino
04-08-2007, 18:30
Most taffeta is tightly woven polyester. It has many of the good properties of nylon, but stretches less and is more UV resistant.

Coffee
04-08-2007, 20:22
Hennessy uses taffeta on some of their hammocks - haven't anything contrary about life span.

HH's is stronger than the stuff I got. I think their patient said it was high tenacity taffeta, whatever that is. I think if you came across the right stuff it might last. But then again, I do not know much about fabric. I would agree with Dino on the cheaper ones.

funbun
04-08-2007, 20:39
I think if you came across the right stuff it might last.

Rainshed (http://therainshed.com/) has high count taffetta on their website. Anyone tried it?


Cool pics and hammock. I finally found a good gathering that works for me. Not the HH way though. I do like a long ridgeline. I am 6'4" and have it at 10' long.

What whipping are you using? I'm making a copy of the Safari Deluxe Asym. It'll be black. I'm thinking of calling it the Stealth Hammock, lol.

Coffee
04-08-2007, 21:00
Cool retailer find. I haven't heard of them before.




Nylon Taffeta
These high-count taffetas (160 x 90) are down proof
Abrasion resistant, wind resistant, breathable, water repellent, light weight
Use for linings, windbreakers, kites, wind socks, stuff sacks, tent walls etc.
Suggested needles: Universal 70/10
Price/yd $6.00
Width 60"
Weight/sq yd 2.2 oz
Machine wash warm, tumble dry warm & remove promptly.
Call for Uncoated Taffeta Swatch Set $1.00



Is this what you are talking about? Sounds interesting. The weight might come out an oz or so heavier if that is important to you. Otherwise it might be worth ordering a simple and checking it out.

One of these days I am going to order a sample of a both of different types of fabric to get a good idea of what they are.

Disclaimer: I will be the first to say I don't now very much about types of fabrics, so take this at face value.

funbun
04-08-2007, 21:57
Hammock Engineer, what whipping did you decide on with your HH clone?

Coffee
04-08-2007, 22:32
Hammock Engineer, what whipping did you decide on with your HH clone?

Sorry forgot to add that.

I ended up not using the HH rolling. I used the gathering method Jeff talks about on his site that has been up there for a while. I am still playing around with it, but for me I am finding that about 11 folds (with 1 fold being 1 fold in each direction) to feel the best for me right now. I also have about a 10' ridgeline for my 10' long material. The hammock hangs down about 25-ish inches in the center. I have about 6 inches of length in the line from the hammock to the ridgeline on the larkshead knot.

I also was laying pretty close to center. However with the tight pitch it got me pretty flat. My biggest issue is getting it flat from my head through my neck to my shoulders. If I do that I can be pretty straight through my lower back. Past that it doesn't matter because I sleep with my stuff sacks under my knees.

I still want to play around with the HH some more. I want to try it without sewing the edges to each other on the ends and with a lot more rolls.

rptinker
04-09-2007, 04:53
Seriously, can these HH clones sit as well as a Speer? I often like to sit in my hammock. It seems the ridgeline would interfere while sitting.

hi!
you could tie the ridgeline a little bit higher up the hammock suspension and then make sort of hood at the hammock ends (just like the clark jungle hammock). The hood encloses the ridgeline inside the netting and reduce the stress on the fabric at the hammock ends.;)

lvleph
04-09-2007, 06:58
Okay, I decided I wanted my ridgeline for my UL version to be permanent, but I don't like the way I have the ridgeline attached. I ended up just tying a knot and the end of the ridgeline and then threaded it through the tubed end, whipped the hammock body and then attached the suspension. I am worried that will create too much tension. How does Hennessy attach their ridgeline?

EDIT: Also, where should the tie outs be located? I would just put them where I feel like it, but then that closes my options to homemade stuff (I love to make gear, but sometimes I do like the convenience of buying).

funbun
04-09-2007, 08:14
Okay, I decided I wanted my ridgeline for my UL version to be permanent, but I don't like the way I have the ridgeline attached. I ended up just tying a knot and the end of the ridgeline and then threaded it through the tubed end, whipped the hammock body and then attached the suspension. I am worried that will create too much tension. How does Hennessy attach their ridgeline?

EDIT: Also, where should the tie outs be located? I would just put them where I feel like it, but then that closes my options to homemade stuff (I love to make gear, but sometimes I do like the convenience of buying).

Not sure about the ridgeline, but the tie outs I measured my friends HH yesterday. There was 42 inches on the short side of the asym tie outs, measured from the ridgeline to the tie out.

Coffee
04-09-2007, 09:54
The HH tieout for me was about knee level on the right side and shoulder level on the right. I would just go with this and customize it for you. Provided you do not have a JRB quilt you need to line up with. You could get someone else to pull on the edge of the hammock to simulate the tieout while you are in it to get a better idea of where to put it.

lvleph
04-09-2007, 11:25
I was debating on a JRB quilt and is the reason I didn't want to just make it so it feels right. I suppose I could always customize the quilt.

headchange4u
04-09-2007, 11:39
I was debating on a JRB quilt and is the reason I didn't want to just make it so it feels right. I suppose I could always customize the quilt.

I can measure the distance between side tie outs on my JRB quilt when I get home tonight. You could find the center point of the hammock (length wise) and use the distance between the side tie outs to find the locations of your side tie outs so that a JRB quilt will fit the hammock.

lvleph
04-09-2007, 14:22
You know I just realized I can look at the KAQ directions to figure out the tie outs. At least I think I can.

funbun
04-09-2007, 15:19
You know I just realized I can look at the KAQ directions to figure out the tie outs. At least I think I can.

Or you can simply tie about 24 inches of ribbon with loops every 2 inches or so and have adjustable tieouts.

TeeDee
04-09-2007, 16:57
HH's is stronger than the stuff I got. I think their patient said it was high tenacity taffeta, whatever that is. I think if you came across the right stuff it might last. But then again, I do not know much about fabric. I would agree with Dino on the cheaper ones.

Hennessy quotes their nylon taffeta as 160x90 thread count. Quest Outfitters lists the same thread count nylon taffeta. They list the weight at 2.2 oz/sq yd. DWR coated. They also list a taffeta at 86x104. Don't know how you would determine which you have.

TeeDee
04-09-2007, 17:01
Not sure about the ridgeline, but the tie outs I measured my friends HH yesterday. There was 42 inches on the short side of the asym tie outs, measured from the ridgeline to the tie out.

Which model of Hennessy was that - I assume the ULBA.

Coffee
04-09-2007, 23:17
Hennessy quotes their nylon taffeta as 160x90 thread count. Quest Outfitters lists the same thread count nylon taffeta. They list the weight at 2.2 oz/sq yd. DWR coated. They also list a taffeta at 86x104. Don't know how you would determine which you have.

Some of the stuff I got is really cheap walmart stuff. I saw some thicker stuff there today. In addition to the 15 yards of DWR and 23 yards of 1.9 untreated ripstop I picked up (rare score in this part of the country).:o

I think if I was making a final version of one I wanted to put some nights on I would order some you are talking about and see how it looks. Based off of what you are saying it should work well.

funbun
04-10-2007, 09:26
Which model of Hennessy was that - I assume the ULBA.

I'm not entirely sure, but think it's the ULBA.

funbun
04-10-2007, 09:27
Why have tie outs? I'm not sure the need for them.

headchange4u
04-10-2007, 09:40
Why have tie outs? I'm not sure the need for them.

Side tie outs are not required but I think they do provide a few advantages:


More room in the hammock.

Compatible with the JRB quilts.

Reduces hammock swing.

Takes up some of the slack in the sides when making a HH clone.

Coffee
04-12-2007, 10:23
I posted this in another thread, but here is how I finally got this to work for me.

Lay the fabric flat
Fold the 2 sides into the middle (making each fold about 1" wide)
Fold the 2 sides independantly just like you would with the standard whipping
Fold the 2 sides into 1
Pull the edges out a couple inches to take slack out of the sides

Then when I hang, I hang it pretty tight with little sag. My problem before was I was trying too big of folds and too much sag. I am using a 10' ridgeline for a 10' long hammock and less than 6" in each larkshead line from the hammock to the supports.

Works for me.

stoikurt
04-12-2007, 10:38
Yeah, I had a buckeye husk stuck to my ankle and I was trying to kick it out without sticking it in the nylon. While I'm thinking about it, why does everyone use nylon for their hammocks? Polyester's strength isn't as affected by moisture and I'm pretty sure it doesn't stretch anywhere close to as much(and I could have gotten some thin stuff at wally world for $4 less per yard):o

I have found digital camo at the Wally World Dollar bin and I believe it to be polyester. It's not rip stop but that might not make any difference. I have made one hammock out of it.

stoikurt
04-12-2007, 11:06
[QUOTE=lvleph;12234]How does Hennessy attach their ridgeline?

QUOTE]

There are loops on each end of the ridge line. The ends of the hammock are bunched up with some holes melted through the gathered fabric. The suspension cord goes through the melted hole and does a double sheet bend. The loose end is passed through the loop on the ridgeline cord before it goes under itself on the last wrap of the double sheet bend. Lastly, the loose end is tied into a bowline in the suspension cord just off the end of the gathered material.

lvleph
04-12-2007, 11:42
Man that is complicated. I will have to see that one to understand it, I think. I did end up using a sheet bend around the hammock which had the ridgeline inside it. I think the ridgeline will hold. I have not had the chance to test it out, so hopefully I will not be sleeping on the ground at SEHHA.

Coffee
04-12-2007, 11:53
Man that is complicated. I will have to see that one to understand it, I think. I did end up using a sheet bend around the hammock which had the ridgeline inside it. I think the ridgeline will hold. I have not had the chance to test it out, so hopefully I will not be sleeping on the ground at SEHHA.

I did that on my last overnighter. I bought an untested hammock with an untested ring system. Put it together for the first time and eye balled everything. It all works out in the end. If that wouldn't have I sure I could have rigged something up. Only issue I had was compressing my underquilt with my hammock sock. Could have fixed it, but it was too cold out and much easier to through my pad in the hammock.

Kind of fun to do that sometimes.

stoikurt
04-12-2007, 13:49
Man that is complicated. I will have to see that one to understand it, I think. I did end up using a sheet bend around the hammock which had the ridgeline inside it. I think the ridgeline will hold. I have not had the chance to test it out, so hopefully I will not be sleeping on the ground at SEHHA.

Sounds worse than it really is. Maybe I can cut it open this weekend and take a picture or it. I had it open the other night when I replaced the suspension cord with some smaller Spectra. The HH has a small cover over the knot area. The cover is about 5 inches long and has a small hole on one end. The other end is about and inch and a half diameter with and is hemmed. You just put a small zip tie through the hem and pull tight to hold the cover in place.

I've had it open twice now. The first time I replaced the stock cord with some 5/16" cord from Boaters World. The other night I replaced that with some smaller Spectra.

TeeDee
04-12-2007, 15:33
There are loops on each end of the ridge line. The ends of the hammock are bunched up with some holes melted through the gathered fabric. The suspension cord goes through the melted hole and does a double sheet bend. The loose end is passed through the loop on the ridgeline cord before it goes under itself on the last wrap of the double sheet bend. Lastly, the loose end is tied into a bowline in the suspension cord just off the end of the gathered material.

Are you really sure that Hennessy uses a double sheet bend??

Just to make sure we are on the same page about a sheet bend, here is a picture of the sheet bend (and doubled):

http://www.animatedknots.com/sheetbend/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

I'm pretty sure the Hennessy doesn't double the hammock material back on itself, so I really cannot imagine how that knot on the end can be a sheet bend, doubled or (k)not.

Here is the image that wilsonbmw took of the Hennessy end:

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=553&c=15

That is definitely not a sheet bend, double or single.

I cannot see the full knot on the end and am having some trouble tracing the cord fully, so am still a little puzzled about the exact route by which he threads the cord through the 2 holes.

stoikurt
04-12-2007, 15:45
Are you really sure that Hennessy uses a double sheet bend??

Just to make sure we are on the same page about a sheet bend, here is a picture of the sheet bend (and doubled):

http://www.animatedknots.com/sheetbend/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

I'm pretty sure the Hennessy doesn't double the hammock material back on itself, so I really cannot imagine how that knot on the end can be a sheet bend, doubled or (k)not.

Here is the image that wilsonbmw took of the Hennessy end:

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=553&c=15

That is definitely not a sheet bend, double or single.

I cannot see the full knot on the end and am having some trouble tracing the cord fully, so am still a little puzzled about the exact route by which he threads the cord through the 2 holes.

It is the same principle. No the hammock material does not double back. But it does have a hole melted in it so you can pass the rope thru it just as doubling the material back creates a "hole" to pass the rope thru. The knot is still a double or maybe even a triple sheet bend. In the picture one of the wraps just goes thru the second hole. If the knot were turned over you could recognize it more as a sheet bend.

lvleph
04-12-2007, 16:11
How does Hennessy attach their ridgeline?

There are loops on each end of the ridge line. The ends of the hammock are bunched up with some holes melted through the gathered fabric. The suspension cord goes through the melted hole and does a double sheet bend. The loose end is passed through the loop on the ridgeline cord before it goes under itself on the last wrap of the double sheet bend. Lastly, the loose end is tied into a bowline in the suspension cord just off the end of the gathered material.

Basically what you are saying is that the ridgeline is tied to the suspension line when it passes through the hammock material?

funbun
04-12-2007, 18:49
Basically what you are saying is that the ridgeline is tied to the suspension line when it passes through the hammock material?

That's what it looks like to me.

TeeDee
04-12-2007, 19:20
Okay - I just took the sock off the Hennessy whipping and inspected the suspension attachment.

Yes it is very much like a double (triple?) sheet bend. Basically he threads trough the end hole, wraps 3 times, through the second hole, back over the wraps, tuck under the lead cord and back out and ties a bowline. The ridgeline is looped around the cord before the tuck under the lead cord. The loop in the end of the ridgeline is a bowline as mentioned above.

attroll
04-29-2007, 13:34
I used rolled the edges from the bottom of the hammock body instead of the standard gathering technique. I must have rolled and whipped this thing 12 times before I got the right "feel". I came up with 5 rolls per side. I made sure to keep the edges as even as possible when rolling. You can see the loop thiny situated in the middle of the hammock, between the top and bottom layer.

Hammock laid out:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/Hammock/HHPrototype029.jpg
headchange4u

I am going to try this but I have some questions.
You sewed the 8 inches for basically creating a short tube.

Here are my questions:

Before you start the rolling on each side where did you position the sewed 8 inches that you created? Is it in the center of the hammock and do you start folding towards it?

Did you fold in each side evenly?

If you did it this way, I don't know how you got the HH feel to the hammock.

headchange4u
04-29-2007, 16:12
The seam of the short tube will be in the center of the hammock aqnd you fold each side evenly to the middle.

lvleph
04-29-2007, 16:29
HH folds in a similar way. The asymmetry of an HH is created by the tie outs and the bug netting.

TeeDee
04-29-2007, 17:01
HH folds in a similar way. The asymmetry of an HH is created by the tie outs and the bug netting.

The bug netting doesn't affect the asym of the HH. I have cut the bug netting off my HH ULBA - it feels the same when I'm in it as before I cut it off. With the bug netting on or off (I can reattach with Velcro), it feels the same when I get in.

The bug netting make a slight difference in the looks of the hammock from the outside with nobody in it. But once inside, I can detect no difference. Never seen it from the outside with somebody in it.

JMO, but I think the way he folds and whips and the tie outs create the asymmetry of the hammocks and the "feel" of the hammock.

lvleph
04-29-2007, 17:28
It is kind of weird since I don't have any tie outs and it still seems to make me lay at an angle. I think maybe it has to do with the tightness of the center of the fabric, which is created by the folding.

seuss
04-29-2007, 17:48
I don't think this has been addressed, but are HHs cut on the bias?

spchtr
04-30-2007, 01:50
I'm wondering. Couldn't you just use a stopper knot and a larks head to attach the ridgeline? A stopper knot on the ridgeline with a larkshead on the loop thingie, similar to how Jeff does his hammock supports?

slowhike
04-30-2007, 05:53
I'm wondering. Couldn't you just use a stopper knot and a larks head to attach the ridgeline? A stopper knot on the ridgeline with a larkshead on the loop thingie, similar to how Jeff does his hammock supports?

if i understand what you're saying (putting an extra knot in the support rope for attaching the ridge line) i believe people try to stay away from using any more knots than necessary because they weaken the rope.

headchange4u
04-30-2007, 08:05
It is kind of weird since I don't have any tie outs and it still seems to make me lay at an angle. I think maybe it has to do with the tightness of the center of the fabric, which is created by the folding.

That's my line of thought also. Whipping a hammock Speer-style leaves the middle of the hammock with sag and the edges are tight. With a roll whip the center of the hammock is tight and the edges are loose. It is not very comfortable to lay straight in the hammock with a roll whip because you lay in a "u" shape. Laying diagonally is the only way you can lay comfortably in a hammock that has been roll whipped.

spchtr
05-03-2007, 00:35
if i understand what you're saying (putting an extra knot in the support rope for attaching the ridge line) i believe people try to stay away from using any more knots than necessary because they weaken the rope.

The only additional knots would be a stopper knot at each end of the ridgeline. And since he's got to have some kind of loops there for the 'biners to attach to those stopper knots would be taking the place of the 'biners. He already has loops inside the hammock to clip his ridgeline too. Those loops would form the larksheads, and a stopper knot on the ridgeline would replace the loop on the ridgeline with the 'biner. You'd end up with the same amount of knots, but without the added weight of the 'biners.

funbun
05-03-2007, 06:26
HH folds in a similar way. The asymmetry of an HH is created by the tie outs . . .

Yeah, I wonder why do people think HH Asym's fabric is cut asymmetrically or asymmetrically folded?

It's just marketing hype. Most people naturally lay off the centerline (asymmetrical). Just like lvleph wrote, HH just puts in the tie outs 42 or 43 inches from the top of the ridge line. That's it. No elf magic or lightsabers or weird Harry Potter mojo.

Anyway I think it's a brilliant marketing scheme: almost like selling sand to an Arab, IMO.

Coffee
05-03-2007, 08:01
I think the HH asym shape is also effected by the shape of the bugnetting. In addition to the side tieouts. I think the end folding just helps with you laying flater.

NCPatrick
05-03-2007, 08:17
Yeah, I wonder why do people think HH Asym's fabric is cut asymmetrically or asymmetrically folded?

It's just marketing hype. Most people naturally lay off the centerline (asymmetrical). Just like lvleph wrote, HH just puts in the tie outs 42 or 43 inches from the top of the ridge line. That's it. No elf magic or lightsabers or weird Harry Potter mojo.

Anyway I think it's a brilliant marketing scheme: almost like selling sand to an Arab, IMO.

I disagree. It's definitely elf magic, it might help to cut the material with your lightsaber too, whenever possible. :rolleyes:

Just Jeff
05-03-2007, 08:29
His patent has diagrams of the material before folding. It's an asym shape. Whether he actually does it or not on the production models is another question, but that's where the idea comes from.

funbun
05-03-2007, 09:43
I disagree. It's definitely elf magic, it might help to cut the material with your lightsaber too, whenever possible. :rolleyes:

Well, you'd need a dual phase saber to make a beam small enough to cut. Or else you'd cut straight through your loving room floor and crack the concrete foundations of your house or cut a big whole in the roof of the apartment below you ;)

Elves are over rated.

NCPatrick
05-03-2007, 10:09
Well, you'd need a dual phase saber to make a beam small enough to cut. Or else you'd cut straight through your loving room floor and crack the concrete foundations of your house or cut a big whole in the roof of the apartment below you ;)

Elves are over rated.


Hang the material from the ceiling (or use the force to just lift it up outside), then cut (again, using the force to help with the precise measurements.) The elves are overrated, but they come in pretty handy in a pinch. Ok. I'm through. :D

slowhike
05-10-2007, 21:31
i had not seen rptinker's pictures of his HH clone (clator clone too), but looks like great work.
headchange & blackbishiop, i guess you saw your HH clone & bb sack at work in the philippines?

headchange4u
05-11-2007, 07:44
I saw rptinker's pics not long ago and I was very impressed with the work. I'm surprised he hasn't started a thread to show them off. The Claytor clone looks awesome.

There's also something about hammocks hanging from palm trees in a tropical environment that appeals to me also.

You can see his gallery here:
http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/browseimages.php?do=member&imageuser=358

rptinker
05-21-2007, 04:16
I saw rptinker's pics not long ago and I was very impressed with the work. I'm surprised he hasn't started a thread to show them off. The Claytor clone looks awesome.

There's also something about hammocks hanging from palm trees in a tropical environment that appeals to me also.

You can see his gallery here:
http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/browseimages.php?do=member&imageuser=358

Sorry to disapoint you guys but my english is not that good.:o Its a bit of effort for me to write a detailed description of my project. Anyway, i will give you a show and tell later. I do have a new hammock made out of navy blue bridal satin with noseeum netting, snakeskin, taffeta tarp. It is whipped/tied like like risk's/JJ's but the netting follows the claytor scheme. I also used sectioned and shokcorded aluminum tube as spreader for my netting. I just tested it on a weekend outing on a beach resort. The best part of the outing was the testing part and the swim on the reef. I did enjoy my satin hammock and slept for 6 hours straight (i was fairly tired after a boat ride and a swim in a marine sanctuary). It was not too stretchy like my nylon taffeta hammocks but comfortable and cool. Anyway, i will probably post pictures tommorow under "faces" (me, wife, and the kids on the sandbar/reef). Sorry guys but no pics of the new hammock yet b/c i was not able to borrow a digital camera for the outing.:p The pictures on the reef/sandbar was all i can manage from a friend b/c i was fairly embarrassed to ask him to take picture of the hammock.:p

headchange4u
05-21-2007, 09:27
Hey I found something for attaching the ridge line that will work better than the biners I am using. It is a Quick Link that Jeff Mentioned earlier. I got them at WalMart in the hardware section for 1.76 a pair. They weigh .7 oz for the pair and are rated at 220lb. They work great.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/quicklink002.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/quicklink005.jpg

funbun
05-21-2007, 10:20
Yeah, that's what I use. I get the smallest one I can find out at Home Depot. they do work well.

Cannibal
06-10-2007, 02:45
It's the middle of the night and I'm bored, so I looked for more of these quick links. Check out www.e-rigging.com. They have 1/8" rated to 400lbs coming in at just a blush over 9 grams each. They are also only .30 each.

I curse you all for forcing me to learn to sew so that I can understand half of the stuff on this site. And I thought paper-cuts were bad; now I've got fingers full of little holes! Actually, you folks get all my respect for turning me on the the world of hanging and DIYing.

TeeDee
06-10-2007, 14:59
It's the middle of the night and I'm bored, so I looked for more of these quick links. Check out www.e-rigging.com. They have 1/8" rated to 400lbs coming in at just a blush over 9 grams each. They are also only .30 each.

I curse you all for forcing me to learn to sew so that I can understand half of the stuff on this site. And I thought paper-cuts were bad; now I've got fingers full of little holes! Actually, you folks get all my respect for turning me on the the world of hanging and DIYing.

If you are concerned about weight, using 2 steel rings is lighter. You can get 1/2" ID steel rings for about $0.24 each (box of 10: $2.38) + shipping and the pair would weigh about or less than 0.1 oz.

thereisnospoon
07-03-2007, 22:52
Hello all! I am new to the forum (truely I have been lurking here for a while and finally registered the other day). I have been sewing and making gear for a long time, but just recently got into making hammocks for some of my friends who are camping with their boy scout sons and can't stand the hard ground...(read old and fat like me).

I have been making a Hammock for a friend and decided to go with the homemade HH as HC4U described in the beginning of this thread. The friends only request was that it have 4 tie outs instead of two. I put the tie outs at 40" along each side

Here's my problem: I used 120 inches of material for length and hemmed about 1.5" on each end. I know that's a big hem, but I wanted ot to be finished clean. Anyways, that gets me down to about 116 give or take in length. I also seamed the ends as HC4U did, flipping the material inside out them stitching along the "long ends" before whipping. The bug netting is attached to one side but free on the other, as per my friends request. I designed and built my own tree huggers (nothing fancy really) and they work great.

I also put the little "loop thigny" HC4U used to attach his ridge line.

Everything works great (it's dark now or I would take pictures to illustrate my issue) except the length of the Hammock seems to have shrunk to nothing.

Did I hang it wrong, do I need to reduce the sag or do I just need to use more material and start with say 140" to accomodate a 6' 220 guy?

:confused:

BTW, right no the Hammock looks like this <_> if you could complete the picture with a line across the top when set up with the 4 tie outs...

Coffee
07-03-2007, 23:03
I am 6'4" and 10' feels about prefect for me. Try adding more length to the ridgeline taking away some sag and see how it works.

Just Jeff
07-04-2007, 07:19
Try staking only two tie-outs and see if that changes anything. It'll change how the hammock lays, but maybe not enough for you to notice when it's weighted. Simplest thing is worth a shot first, though.

slowhike
07-04-2007, 11:18
i'll have to let the others answer your questions, but welcome to HF. ...tim

thereisnospoon
07-04-2007, 15:56
I was able to get it worked out, thanksd for your help. It was a combo of 4 stakes and the ridge line.

I like it so much, I built one for me as well. I'll try and get some pics up later today.

Finishing a tent as we speak.

Thanks for the warm welcome!
Spoon

headchange4u
07-04-2007, 16:46
Congrats on the new hammock. Can wait to see pics.

thereisnospoon
07-05-2007, 19:29
Pics as promised. WARNING: I sew better than I photograph!

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0967.jpg

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0970.jpg

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0968.jpg

Next Project: Cat cut tarp ; - )

headchange4u
07-05-2007, 19:47
Wow. Looks great thereisnospoon. Impressive work. I bet neo will love the camo.

thereisnospoon
07-05-2007, 21:54
Actually a big thank you to you for the thread and the pattern-or at least the instruction. I really believe the folding makes this such a comfy Hammock.

Thanks!

PS: I think NEO prefers all black. ;)

stoikurt
07-12-2007, 08:19
PS: I think NEO prefers all black. ;)

Not from what we've seen and heard from him here. Unless he's recently changed, but I doubt it.

thereisnospoon
07-12-2007, 23:22
Sorry, I thought HC4U was referring to my screen name, whenin actuality, there is a poster here named NEO...

I bet we like a lot of the same movies :rolleyes:

Shadowmoss
07-14-2007, 09:26
Neo (the one here) will have a hang-out in October that several of us plan to attend. It wouldn't be that far of a drive for you, so I hope you can attend. The two of you can compare movies :D .

Ewker
07-14-2007, 10:23
thereisnospoon,

whats with all the guy lines..I would kill myself tripping all over them

thereisnospoon
07-14-2007, 17:30
thereisnospoon,

whats with all the guy lines..I would kill myself tripping all over them

I have two tie outs for the hammock and then 2 more for the corners of the Tarp going to the same stakes. The others you see "hanging" are because the tarp is made to use with or without the hammock and so has additional tie outs for ground use (heaven forbid).

I actually have created a new hex to go with this hammock. It has 2 on each side, so it's really dangerous. :eek:

If there is a better way please let me know...I am here to learn.

Shadowmoss
07-14-2007, 17:41
That's the way my Scout gets tied out, 2 for the hammock and 4 for the hex tarp. It worked well at the hang-out. Messing with Ewker is just a collateral benefit of the method, not designed in but a fun feature to discover.

thereisnospoon
07-14-2007, 19:01
I tried to read the CatCut thread like three times...then chickened out and built a hex.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0991.jpg

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0992.jpg

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c319/thereisnospoon1/IMG_0993.jpg

slowhike
07-14-2007, 19:31
nice looking tarp thereisnospoon.
i kinda like the way the ridge line runs...strait except for the upward curve near each end.

thereisnospoon
07-15-2007, 07:29
nice looking tarp thereisnospoon.
i kinda like the way the ridge line runs...strait except for the upward curve near each end.

I didn't design that, it just happens that the way I have it tied out created that little swoop. Does provide a lot of coverage. I haven't weighed it yet, but it felt like 10-12oz at most.

Once again I say thanks, y'all have been very helpful. Where/when is the hang out(info link?)

Spoon

Shadowmoss
07-15-2007, 07:52
neo will announce it nearer to the time, I'm sure. He said early October, I'm pretty sure. He has a place that is free to camp, somplace on the Nachez Trace I think. However, I'm going from memory, and he is the one who is organizing it. Just keep an eye out in the group happenings area.

There is also a hang-out at Hot Springs, NC in September. Someone else will have to provide the link to that as I just today joined the hammock email list that is run by the guy who organizes that one. I went to the one there in June and it was a lot of fun.

Exploriment
07-17-2007, 15:15
Hey thereisnospoon,

Where did you find the Marpat material?

thereisnospoon
07-18-2007, 19:08
Hey thereisnospoon,

Where did you find the Marpat material?

Believe it or not...Wal-Mart. $1.00/yard....

alex30808
09-09-2007, 15:25
I know this thread is a few months old now...but I just joined the site and have to say thank you to each and every one of you for your input. I have now made my first hammock and have taken it on the trail once...there are some modifications that need to be done...but...it'll all work out. Again...Thanks and I'll keep ya posted on my progress.

slowhike
09-09-2007, 15:38
I know this thread is a few months old now...but I just joined the site and have to say thank you to each and every one of you for your input. I have now made my first hammock and have taken it on the trail once...there are some modifications that need to be done...but...it'll all work out. Again...Thanks and I'll keep ya posted on my progress.

by all means, keep us posted. & welcome to HF alex. ...tim

job13_5
09-15-2007, 00:49
I went and used this tutorial to make my own DIY Hennessy Hammock and I thought it had gone really well until I layed in the thing. I don't know what went wrong, but when I position myself at an angle the head portion of the edge of the hammock (the right side) gets really tight and pushes my body onto its side. It's super uncomfortable...definitely the opposite experience I've had with my Hennessy.

I have no idea what I did wrong. Below are some pictures of the hammock as it is. If anyone has any clues as to how I can fix it, please let me know.


In these two pictures you can somewhat see how the weird tension problem kicks me onto my side. If I lay straight I don't get a problem, and the higher I move towards the head, the worse it gets. Notice my disgruntle expression.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070097.jpg

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070096.jpg

Here is a pic of me laying at the opposite angle, which is more comfortable, but creates this huge ridge of tensioned fabric. What's up with this?

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070099.jpg

Lastly is an un used side and front view of the overall hammock.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070103.jpg

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070100.jpg

Is there a way I can fix it? Do I need to re-roll it and whip it again? I thought I did it right (five equally distanced folds on either side)?

Any advice would be great! Thanks!

FanaticFringer
09-15-2007, 15:43
Nice job. It looks really good. Now smile a little....your in a hammock not in a tent.:D



I went and used this tutorial to make my own DIY Hennessy Hammock and I thought it had gone really well until I layed in the thing. I don't know what went wrong, but when I position myself at an angle the head portion of the edge of the hammock (the right side) gets really tight and pushes my body onto its side. It's super uncomfortable...definitely the opposite experience I've had with my Hennessy.

I have no idea what I did wrong. Below are some pictures of the hammock as it is. If anyone has any clues as to how I can fix it, please let me know.


In these two pictures you can somewhat see how the weird tension problem kicks me onto my side. If I lay straight I don't get a problem, and the higher I move towards the head, the worse it gets. Notice my disgruntle expression.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070097.jpg

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070096.jpg

Here is a pic of me laying at the opposite angle, which is more comfortable, but creates this huge ridge of tensioned fabric. What's up with this?

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070099.jpg

Lastly is an un used side and front view of the overall hammock.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070103.jpg

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Misc/?action=view&current=2007_0914Parents_visit_20070100.jpg

Is there a way I can fix it? Do I need to re-roll it and whip it again? I thought I did it right (five equally distanced folds on either side)?

Any advice would be great! Thanks!

terceiro
09-15-2007, 18:34
I don't know what went wrong, but when I position myself at an angle the head portion of the edge of the hammock (the right side) gets really tight and pushes my body onto its side. It's super uncomfortable...definitely the opposite experience I've had with my Hennessy.Since re-rolling and re-whipping costs nothing and can't make it worse, you're silly for not trying that first. I personally don't like Headchange's method and much prefer the Risk/Hennessy method. But I've also had some surprising success from the "fold in half/scrunch into a messy ball and whip" technique as well. In a nutshell: unwhip, re-roll, and try it again.

Oh, and what FF said: smile a little!

FanaticFringer
09-16-2007, 01:09
Since re-rolling and re-whipping costs nothing and can't make it worse, you're silly for not trying that first. I personally don't like Headchange's method and much prefer the Risk/Hennessy method. But I've also had some surprising success from the "fold in half/scrunch into a messy ball and whip" technique as well. In a nutshell: unwhip, re-roll, and try it again.

Oh, and what FF said: smile a little!

What he said. Sorry did'nt read all of your post. Now I understand why you were'nt smiling.

job13_5
09-16-2007, 12:22
Since re-rolling and re-whipping costs nothing and can't make it worse, you're silly for not trying that first. I personally don't like Headchange's method and much prefer the Risk/Hennessy method. But I've also had some surprising success from the "fold in half/scrunch into a messy ball and whip" technique as well. In a nutshell: unwhip, re-roll, and try it again.

Okay, I'm on it...what should I be looking for in a good roll? What is the Risk/Hennessy method?

Thank you! And I'll try smiling a bit. I get pretty frustrated when my projects don't work out...just breathe....

dblhmmck
09-16-2007, 12:44
Hey friend,

I know how you feel...about projects not meeting your expectations.

Let me make a suggestion. It is based on my experience of first starting with a NON-asym HH and later upgrading to an asym. My first pitch of the asym was not as comfortable as the older model.

Why? Well, since a sytmetrical hammock has pullouts equally spaced between head and foot, it calls for pulling the guylines directly perpendicular to the way the hammock is hung. But in an Asym, this is not the case. Try rotating the shoulder guyline about 15 degrees towards the head, and rotating the knee guyline towards the foot. I think this could help a lot- based on what I think I am seeing in your second photo.

warbonnetguy
09-16-2007, 12:45
simpler is sometimes better. try sewing a hem in the end of the fabric. run some tiny string through there and cinch it tight and tie it off into a solid mass of fabric. now just loop a larks head/girth hitch around the mass with your suspension line. all the fabric is even. your guylines take up the slack on the sides. should feel alot like an eno hammock, but the hem isn't actually loaded due to the girth hitch.



Okay, I'm on it...what should I be looking for in a good roll? What is the Risk/Hennessy method?

Thank you! And I'll try smiling a bit. I get pretty frustrated when my projects don't work out...just breathe....

terceiro
09-16-2007, 19:33
Okay, I'm on it...what should I be looking for in a good roll? What is the Risk/Hennessy method?If you note the technique that headchange describes earlier in this thread is his own; it is not the same as a Hennessy roll. To get the real goods, check out Wilsonbmw's great reverse engineer of a Hennessy roll technique:

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=572&catid=searchresults&searchid=1461

This technique is just about the same as Risk's version he describes in his TestHammock:

http://www.imrisk.com/testhammock/testhammock.htm

I'm not a favor of the knot (I think whipping is a little more predictable, if perhaps less reliable), but the roll technique is solid.

You might decide on different technique, and I don't think there's really any consensus about them. Different strokes for different strokes and all that. It's a question of preference, not correctness.

job13_5
09-18-2007, 15:44
I used the Hennessy fold technique and that seems to have solved the problem! I think I'm going to change the location of the side pullouts (just ordered some grip clips to do the job), but other than that it feels great!

I'll try and post some pics when I get the bug netting on.

Thanks for all the info!

job13_5
09-22-2007, 20:59
Alright, she's all done....well at least for now. I've still got to build her a rain fly and probably some other amenities. But here's the pictures:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Hammocking/2007_0922Hammock_20070003.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Hammocking/2007_0922Hammock_20070001.jpg

My girlfriend giving it a little test.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/cardwelc/Hammocking/2007_0922Hammock_20070006.jpg

I really like the addition of the treking pole spreader bar, it really adds a lot of head room.

Thanks for all the help and the instruction!

slowhike
09-22-2007, 21:45
looking good. i use a trekking pole to spread my hammock the same way.
gives it a nice roomy feel.

headchange4u
09-23-2007, 00:19
That's a really nice looking hammock. Your girlfriend looks like she is laying flat as a board in that hammock. I like the trekking pole. Congrats.

dblhmmck
09-23-2007, 19:43
It looks like you found a great solution to the uneven lie of your hammock from your previous post. Adding the hiking pole looks like a good implementation. And moving the tie outs the way that you did also looks like it is working well. It looks like you decided on symetrical placement, rather than the asym arrangement that you had earlier. I think that makes good sense when used in conjunction with a spreader bar. Good job!

Cannibal
09-25-2007, 19:09
Looks great! I like the color. How long did it end up?

job13_5
09-26-2007, 02:04
Looks great! I like the color. How long did it end up?

Thanks. Not sure on the exact length. It started out at 120" and ended up just a hair shorter than my Asym Backpacker.

headchange4u
09-26-2007, 21:36
Just FYI but he question had come up in the past and I thought I would provide the info. I just added a picture and instructions for measuring and placing the asymm.
tie out points in the first post (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showpost.php?p=8828&postcount=1). This will give you the proper location for the tie outs on the hammock for use with JRB quilts or other HH accessories that use the tie outs.

stoikurt
09-27-2007, 08:04
Nice add-in HC. That'll be very helpful, especially for those that don't already have an UQ to measure from.

headchange4u
09-27-2007, 08:33
Nice add-in HC. That'll be very helpful, especially for those that don't already have an UQ to measure from.

Thanks. It's something I had been meaning to do for a while but just never got around to it. I was adding loops to my Neat Sheet Multi-Quilt (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1860) and I decided to take the measurements and post the info.

headchange4u
12-12-2007, 16:46
Today I added a method for measuring and making a top cover pattern at the bottom of post 2 (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showpost.php?p=8829&postcount=2). I had had a few request to add this info, so there it is.

I will also be adding a video tutorial on making a roll whip in the very near future. Stay tuned.

traviso71
12-12-2007, 21:52
Huzzah!!! Once I get the means together, this design will likely be my first go at a hammock, so I am anxious to see the roll vid! Hey, I was wondering... how did you sew the "tube" at the ends.... what kinda of a stitch? Or does that really matter.

headchange4u
12-12-2007, 22:52
what kinda of a stitch? Or does that really matter.

Just a straight stitch, double stitched.

hdbint
02-05-2008, 17:20
Any luck on getting the whipping video together?

headchange4u
02-05-2008, 17:37
Most of the video has been filmed, but I am still in the process of figuring out what editing software that I want to use. It has also been a long time since I have edited any video so I have been just playing around trying to get things worked out. It shouldn't be much longer.

Brandon
02-29-2008, 19:02
hmmmmmmmm.... i'm new here, it's approaching midnight, I can see the sewing machine from where I am.... saving grace is the lack of fabric in the house! oh, and my replaced HH exped asym on the arm chair.

Might knock one up for the wife though.

BurningCedar
10-05-2008, 21:03
I finally finished my DIY HH (based on headchange4u’s design) but added a few design tweaks, so I decided to revive this post and share the changes. Technically, this is my second DIY HH; but the first one didn’t turn out so well, so we’ll just forget it happened.

To start, here's a couple of general photos of the hammock:

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_01_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4225&c=searchresults&searchid=8328) http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_02_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4226&c=member&imageuser=456)

Changed Location of Tie Outs
This is I believe the most useful of the changes made. warbonnetguy had previously made a post that questioned whether or not the HH tie outs were really in the ideal location. The factory HH tie outs are located a little above your elbow and a little below your knee when laying diagonally. By moving the tie outs towards your head and feet you gain more perceived room in the hammock and can lay somewhat flatter.

The exact location may vary depending on your height. I’m 5’10” and found that a location 27” from the center of the hammock to be ideal (versus the factory HH location of 13” from center). When I lay in the hammock, that places the top tie out slightly above my shoulder and the bottom tie out right at my feet. I was by myself when I took these photos so I couldn’t get a good photo of the head; but here’s a photo of me laying in the hammock. Note the position of the tie out.

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_03_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4227&c=member&imageuser=456)

To determine the ideal location, I set up my new hammock before sewing in any tie outs or zippers. I got some of the cheap plastic clamp-on style tie outs from the hardware store and used them to try various locations while laying in the hammock.

The only downside is that your stock JRB quilt won’t have the ribbon tie out at the proper location. No problem – if you can sew a hammock, adding a ribbon loop to your JRB shouldn’t pose a sewing challenge.

I'm grateful to warbonnetguy for the inspiration for this change. I think it adds a great improvement to the overall HH design!

Tie Out Reinforcements
There was a discussion earlier in this topic that questioned whether the factory “tie out triangles” (I don’t know the technical term) helped to form the asym design or helped reinforce the tie outs. I frankly don’t know whether it does either of these; but I do know that adding the triangles back into the design avoided having the zipper make a 90 turn like in the original design. Note in the photo below how much straighter the zipper runs. This should both reduce the possibility of damage to the zipper and make it much easier and smoother to zip and unzip the hammock (especially in the middle of the night). I found that the zipper is even straighter than shown in the photo with when I'm in the hammock (I guess bulk does sometimes help).

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_04_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4228&c=member&imageuser=456)

I formed the triangles from a double-layer of left over 1.9 ounce nylon. The dimensions are the same as on the HH: 8” wide at the base (where the zipper is sewn) and 3” tall.

The addition of the triangles does add a couple of complexities to the design. First, it makes both edges 2” shorter (I’ll leave the mathematical description of why to the Math Gods on the site – they’ve been a little quiet lately and need something new to discuss). It’s important that you re-locate the center point of the hammock after adding the triangles and before sewing on any zippers or other tie out points.

The second complication will come later when you sew the bug net. Now instead of a simple parabola you’ll have to “chop off” two of the corners to correspond to the triangle. I haven’t sewn the bug net yet so I don’t have a specific solution; but it really should be simple and just involve a couple of additional measurements.

Hammock Length
I made my hammock a bit longer for two reasons. First to gain just a bit more space and comfort. Secondly (and this is probably the real reason) because I’m still a slow and not very good sewer. The zippers I selected were 110” long and I didn’t want to have to shorten them. Thus I calculated my fabric length before sewing as:

110” for the zippers
+ 2” for the “lost fabric” when I sew in the triangles (see “Tie Out Reinforcements” above)
+ 16” for the two ends that are sewn together into a channel, 8" each
+ 2” for the hem allowance, 1” on each edge
------
130” length before sewing

To allow for a little sloppiness on my part, I sewed in the zippers before sewing in the end channels. That way if I was a little long or short on my other measurements, I simply adjusted the length of the channel accordingly.

Combined “Loop Thingy” and Ridge Line
This is a simple one. One loop thingy I made just as described by headchange4u. For the second one, I took a 10’ length of Spyderline and tied two stopper knots in one end (one right at the end, the other about 3” away). The remainder of the Spyderline became my ridge line. I tied a quick link to one end to make the ridgeline removable. I didn’t feel a need to have a quick link on both ends. If I don’t want the ridgeline, I’ll simply remove the one end and let the other hang to the ground.

There’s really no huge advantage to doing it this way. It does produce an overly strong ridgeline and eliminates a couple of knots; but nothing else.

JRB Tie Outs
While I was at it, I decided to sew some webbing tie out points for my JRB quilts. I like these better than the JRB suspension kit. The kit is nice as it requires no modifications to your hammock; but I think the webbing tie outs better positions the hammock and makes it much less likely to become misaligned. I made the tie outs from 3/8” nylon webbing (use a 6’ dog leash for a small dog if you can’t find the webbing locally).

Here’s a photo closeup of the tie out and of the JRB attached to the hammock. I used Niteize small S-biners to attach the quilt to the hammock.

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_05_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4229&c=member&imageuser=456) http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_06_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4230&c=member&imageuser=456) http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_07_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4231&c=member&imageuser=456)

Reinforced End Channel
For some reason, the first time I layed in my new hammock, I noticed a great amount of stress on the seam that holds the channel closed on the two ends. The thread was stretched almost to the breaking point when I put my bulk into the hammock. I solved that by simply sewing some leftover 1-1/2” seat belt webbing I had leftover to the inside of the channel where the stress was. See the attached photo. You can’t see the webbing in the photo; but you can see the stitching that’s holding it.

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/4/5/6/diy_hh_08_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4232&c=member&imageuser=456)

Summary
Hopefully someone will find at least some of these ideas useful. I really, really like the original design that headchange4u came up with. This is by far the most comfortable hammock I’ve slept in. You'll have to forgive the photos. I haven't figured out yet how to do the nice "pop up" photos that I see in some of the posts.

elcolombianito
10-05-2008, 21:25
:boggle: Congrats BurningCedar. It looks great. I want to make one for myself too and the triangle side tieout mod i will definitely have in mind. Again congrats.

Perkolady
10-06-2008, 10:07
Really really awesome, BurningCedar!!

Thanks for sharing your ideas for the changes you made... good food for thought since mine is in the planning stages !

You did a wonderful job- it really looks great !

Perkolady

headchange4u
10-06-2008, 10:17
Nice writeup BC.

I'm gonna have to do my side tie outs like yours, with the reinforcement patches. The point where my zipper turns that corner is where I'm having some failures. Using the patches like you incorporated on your hammock should fix the problem.

Downunderhang
02-07-2009, 01:24
First roll on each side:

Added 12-12-07:
Making a top cover pattern

I have had a few people ask how I made my top covers for my HH clone. It's not a complicated process, but it is kinda hard to explain. I hope my instructions are clear enough.

I do highly recommend that you make a pattern because it will allow you to easily make different top covers, from different materials, and it's a lot easier to make marks and measurements on the pattern paper than it is to mark the fabric. I used Tyvek to make my pattern. You can get enough Tyvek from Ebay for $5-6 to make this reusable pattern (about 2-3 yards should be enough) .

To begin with, you will need to setup the hammock normally , and stake out the side tie outs. You will only be taking 3 measurements from the hammock:
the ridge line measurement (A), the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out (B), and the short side asym measurement (C). The ridge line measurement should be the distance between where the fabric comes together on the foot end to where the fabric comes together on the head end. It is not the actual length of the ridge line.

The first thing that I did was to draw out a rectangle using the ridge line measurement as the height and 2 x the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out as the width of the rectangle (rectangle indicated by red and blue dotted lines). For example, if you had a ridge line measurement of 80" and a the distance from the ridge line to the side tie out is 30" per side, then the rectangle should be 80" tall and 60" wide. The rectangle should be divided in half, lengthwise, by measurement A.

The next thing that you need to do is transfer measurement C to the pattern. Lay your yard stick at the apex point and adjust it so that the distance between the apex and the intersect point matches your measurement C Repeat this process on the opposite end of the the pattern, on the opposite side of the center line.

The final step in making the pattern is to draw in the long asym sides (indicated by the dotted black line). All you have to do is to use a straight edge to make a line from the intersect point to the apex point that is the furthest away.

After you have all your lines drawn, simply cut out the asymmetrically shaped pattern from the rectangle and you now have a reusable top cover pattern.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v704/headchange4u/TOPCOVERPATTERN.jpg


I thought I'd play around with some maths to save on having to cut out a pattern for the top cover. Here it is if you want to use it:

http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/2/4/6/0/hammock_dimensions_758066_thumb.jpg (http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/showimage.php?i=4949&c=)

I've based it on H4U's original diagram and added some more dimensions. A, B and C are as per the original diagram. As you can see the pattern has been rotated on the material to be cut. NB: This does mean that the ridge line does not follow the weave of the material but this wasn't a big deal for me.

The key measurements we are after is G - the width to be cut, H - the off-cut length, and, if you don't want to use the ridgeline measurement on the angle, the length of the material (not given a letter in my diagram). To get these measurements, we first need to calculate some other measurements - D, E and F as follows:

D = Square root of (C squared - B squared)
E = A - D
F = Square root of (E squared + B squared)

Now we can get G = B/F*A
And H = Square root of (C squared - G squared)
The length of the material to be cut from is F+H

So to cut the material measure off a length of F+H, cut it to a width of G. Then measure down H from the top right corner and cut from there to the top left corner in a straight line. Then measure up H from the bottom left corner and cut from there to the bottom right corner in a straight line.

I hope that helps - it worked for me.

extreme_yarak
02-09-2009, 15:05
I'm new to this forum and was just wondering.....I would love to give it a go to make my own Hennessy clone but, how does the costs compare. I was looking at the Expedition Asym at a price of $140. If you factor in time and materials......
how does a homemade compare?

Just wondering.

Thanks!

Ramblinrev
02-09-2009, 16:13
If you don't care about your time... you might save some money depending on the fabric you use. If you include your time... you will probably not save a thing. I am an avid DIYer so I'm not dissing on the DIY process. But saving money is not a good reason to make your own most of the time.

extreme_yarak
02-09-2009, 16:32
I also enjoy the DIY process, so much so that I have too many projects going now. I noticed some folks mentioning ripstop from Walmart. Our little bitty Walmart doesn't seem to carry any. Do you have any recommended on-line sources for material?

If I take on a hammock project, I would like to incorporate some type (convert into back pack) strapping. This would be similar to the Civil War era bed rolls where everything rolled up inside the blanket and then tied off.

I know, I'm probably shooting for too much....like most of my ideas. ;-)

Cannibal
02-09-2009, 16:36
If I take on a hammock project, I would like to incorporate some type (convert into back pack) strapping. This would be similar to the Civil War era bed rolls where everything rolled up inside the blanket and then tied off.
Well then, you need to take on one of these (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=2479&highlight=bridgeskin). :thumbup1:

Lots of good places for fabric online. My two current favorites are OWF (http://www.owfinc.com/) & Thru-Hiker (http://thru-hiker.com/materials/index.php).

Ramblinrev
02-09-2009, 16:46
I don't see a HH clone as a combo hammock/pack design. But then I may just not have the imagination. I've seen Dutch's gearskin in action and it is an awesome piece but bears no resemblence to an HH clone.

extreme_yarak
02-09-2009, 19:38
Well then, you need to take on one of these (http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=2479&highlight=bridgeskin). :thumbup1:

Lots of good places for fabric online. My two current favorites are OWF (http://www.owfinc.com/) & Thru-Hiker (http://thru-hiker.com/materials/index.php).

That is too sweet. How's the storage capacity? Is that a stuff sack sandwiched in there to keep things tidy? Thanks for the link.

Cannibal
02-10-2009, 10:29
Yes, most people that use a gearskin pack put everything into one large waterproof/resistant sack; trash compactor bags, large ziploc storage bags, etc. I've never used one, but I've heard folks talk about the extra load they can carry. I think Coffee burned one out on his thru.

But hey, there is still the challenge of making a Hennessy style hammock that can double as a pack. Go for it!:cool:

jeffjenn
02-23-2009, 02:39
HC4U or anyone who can answer,

I have read this a few times, & am thinking that if a person used asym tieouts on any type of hammock (say a eno) & then cut out/attached the bug netting as shown in these directions it would basically look & act like a Hennessy? I know it would not have the same whipping & feel of a HH, but it would be an "Asym" hammock as Tom H. would call/patent it. Correct???