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scooterdogma
05-08-2016, 03:43
I have been backpacking and hammocking since August 2015. I have completed the first 240 miles of the AT in my hammock. I am at a point where it's a bit harder to do sections since the drive to the end is longer. I live in the Atlanta area and was hoping to find women in this area (TN/NC/GA) with backpacking/hammocking experience so I can pick their brain. I'll keep checking back. Thanks everyone for all the great info here.

Ask away, I've done that section several times in a hammock. I'm sure once you post your question you will get lots of answers. This group is a pretty helpful lot. :lol:

jadekayak
05-08-2016, 04:18
When I want privacy I do about the same thing I do at home. I shut the door :)

I set up so I can pull my tarp down into A Frame then install a Grizz Beak on the end (if there is one) that faces the camp. I am also not shy about announcing what I am doing be it changing clothing or cleaning up. Besides, if someone "peeks" in at me, I am not responsible if they go blind!!

Such a cool reply.

I usually require privacy to protect others or if near the sea I may get mistaken for a walrus or beached whale and harpooned

Phantom Grappler
05-08-2016, 07:37
Happy Mothers Day to You All!


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ShadowSoul
05-08-2016, 14:24
I know the whole issue of having to go to the bathroom has been addressed before but I was wondering about hammocks and bugnets. I am annoyed that I have to get out of my hammock, but anatomy is what it is. But... Is it more convenient to have a zipper net or the Fronkey style. Pros and cons of each?

Country Roads
05-08-2016, 14:41
For me, I like the zipper bug net. Others take to long and that is not good. The zippered net does not require me to think too much in the middle of the night and I make sure that the zipper pull is pretty much in the same place. Fronkey style, I expect, would work well, but I hate thinking too much or fumbling with netting. I also have a tendency when getting back in the hammock to sit into the netting, and this is less of an issue if it is a zippered net.

scooterdogma
05-09-2016, 05:43
I'm a lazy backpacker, the less thought I have to put in to my equipment the better. With that being said, I like the zipper. I keep the pulls at my shoulder, so I know where they are at all times. Easy in and out. It is fun to try all kinds before you pick one.

WalksIn2Trees
05-09-2016, 07:42
I'm a guy, but I doubt there's much difference between guys and gals when it comes to needing to getting out of your netting in a hurry.
My netting has a bottom opening. What I did was sew a channel around the opening and thread through a nylon strap.

This does two things:

it weights the bottom of the netting (which keeps it tensioned for a clear unwrinkled view while also keeping it pressed against the sides of your hammock to keep the skeeters from finding a way in, and the wind from lifting it like Marilyn Monroe's skirt in that famous photo, letting in all the skeeters)

And, it gives your net opening an "edge" that you can find in a hurry with your feet... No worries about a zipper getting jammed. I just put my shoes on, find the edge with my toes and lift it over my head as I get out.

I experimented with other weighting methods after the waking up with mosquitoes buzzing around a few times when the wind had opened up gaps. Rock pockets, Sewn in magnets, they worked mostly but left gaps along the sides, and finding the opening could be tough and I ripped these earlier versions thinking I'd found the opening when I hadn't. It was two 6ft by 1" utility straps from the camping section at Walmart, buckled together, end to end. As a closed loop it makes an opening smaller than the width of my hammock with me in it but big enough to put over my head while I'm seated in my hammock.

Nothing worse than a stuck zipper combined with late night bathroom emergency, or, I guess ANY emergency

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lilprincess
05-09-2016, 18:25
I have has both and really enjoy my fronkey style. It means that I can sit up and get my shoes on with minimal bug exposure.
I don't have a problem with bugs coming in if I cinch it on the bottom and when I am laying down in the hammock the net touches my under quilt and seals me in
Also I can remove it in the colder months when the bugs are sleeping and leave it at home.

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mayhemkb
05-11-2016, 09:47
Such a cool reply.

I usually require privacy to protect others or if near the sea I may get mistaken for a walrus or beached whale and harpooned

I typically end up with Captain Ahab chasing me when I get near a beach with exposed flesh. . .not nearly tan enough to be mistaken for a walrus. ;)

I prefer a zipper integrated net. Easy in and out. I used the 360 style net for a bit and while it worked fine it was heavy and bulky. No experience with a Fronkey style though.

cataraftgirl
05-12-2016, 21:06
I posted this in the paddling forum, but someone suggested it might be helpful in this thread as well for lady paddlers. I shared my kayak toilet set-up that I used on a recent 4 day kayak trip on the Colorado River in Utah. We were a group of 4 guys and two gals. We were required to use a "wag bag" type toilet, and we were allowed to carry out the used bags in a dry bag. Some rivers require that the used bags be carried out in a hard sided container. I don't know about the rest of you ladies, but I really prefer a "real-ish" toilet. I was happy to discover the Turbo Toilet at Emergency Essentials Store here in Salt Lake City. It packs down flat, fits in my medium sized kayak hatch, and pops up easily to hold a wag bag. It will support 330 lb. , had a sturdy metal frame inside it, and it's much easier to fold up and store than the Pett type toilets with the folding legs. We used 1-2 bags per camp/day (3-4 deposits per bag). I used the Rest Stop II brand bag this time and prefer them over the Cleanwaste brand. Much easier to unfold, use, fold up, stow in the zip lock bag, and way less odor than the Cleanwaste. Here are some pictures of the toilet. It can be found online at Black pine.com or Amazon. I transport it in a dry bag and it weighs 4.5lb in the dry bag. Picture #3 shows it set up for use, with the carry dry bag acting as a cover when not in use. We would set the other dry bag with the new(unused bags) on top to keep the wind from blowing it off. We had no problem with wind or critters messing with it like this, but that could be an issue.

Dog Listener
06-28-2016, 17:05
Hello ladies and gents, I would love to have a thread that talks about how we have do some things differently than our dear gentlemen. For instance: do you even fully change in the woods? In your hammock.
My longest trip has only been three days. I can totally live with staying in the same clothes up top for that long. In the fall I'll be out for a week or more. How do you discretely change your short and bra in the hammock?
How about get your stuff ready laid out in your hammock or on a camp chair. Have your tarp set in an A frame shape. Throw your underquilt over one open end and your top quilt over the other open end. All that should show would be from the knees down.

Dog Listener
06-28-2016, 17:16
Poncho. Good idea, though I'm guessing most of us could do it with just a shirt. I'm kinda with lilprincess; I don't change unless absolutely necessary. I go to bed late at group events, so sometimes I just make sure there are no lights near me, set my stuff out, turn off my headlamp and do it in the dark. Always the chance of some one getting up, I guess that's a risk I take. I've also done the...stealthily look around...coast is clear...ok MAD DASH!!! 3.5 second change! Never been caught...that I know of...

GrannyPat, didn't know the bottle thing could be done. Where do you practice that? In the bath tub? And can I just ask, am I the only one who can't seem to help getting splatter all over the bottoms of my pants when I pee? Grass is the best but there's no grass back in the woods! I use that "turn off my headlamp thing" to pee in the middle of the night too.
To keep your ankles dry, try sitting on the very edge of a downed log. That way you can move your feet far away. That is all I can do since I tore my ACL.

Dog Listener
06-28-2016, 19:51
I'm a lazy backpacker, the less thought I have to put in to my equipment the better. With that being said, I like the zipper. I keep the pulls at my shoulder, so I know where they are at all times. Easy in and out. It is fun to try all kinds before you pick one.
I put a piece of glow string on the zipper pulls for dark nights.

Hotlips
06-29-2016, 07:20
This is just a suggestion, for those who don't like to pee in the woods. If you have a chair or stool you set up under your tarp, and you can close your doors down at the ends of your tarp for privacy. Get a Maxwell house coffee container (the big blue one with the big opening on top) put it in your chair under your tarp, sit on it, pee in it, put the top on it, then discreetly empty it in the morning somewhere out in the woods. Never have to leave your tarp to pee. Pant legs stay dry.

sueb2b
07-16-2016, 15:24
Hey y'all. I haven't gone back and looked through this whole thread yet, so I don't know if this topic was discussed or not. (I'll do that in a bit; right now I'm posting on a work break.)

I've been using a WBBB for the past few years. Really like it. I generally get out for several weekends/year, including a couple BWCA trips, all using the hammock.

What I'm wondering is if any women have tried/used an amok draumr. I've heard a little bit from women regarding how it works for them. I'm intrigued, but I'm looking for more feedback before I take a plunge. Given differences in height, center of gravity, etc., I'm interested if anyone has any first-hand experience.

THeath2
07-20-2016, 08:07
I know this is an old post, but I've just joined the hammocking world. I would really be interested in an all women hang! I would love to see an update on whether or not you got this together and if you're having another one.

THeath2
07-20-2016, 08:35
I am also new to hammocks, but I live in middle TN. I would be willing to travel to be with other hammockers, learn more about setting up efficiently, see what gear others have, and make new outdoorsy friends.

THeath2
07-20-2016, 08:42
Magnolia, I live in middle TN, and would love to go hammock camping with another female. My husband is several years older and doesn't even like the outdoors anyway! I have only been hammock camping once, but can't wait for cooler weather to go again. I haven't done any backpacking/hiking--well, only short day hikes, but would be willing to go sometimes.

THeath2
07-20-2016, 08:49
Just saw this, so it's too late for me, but I would love to know how it went. I'm new to hammock camping and would love to get with others to learn more.

sqidmark
07-20-2016, 08:59
I suspect you've missed the "Reply With Quote" button?

Slack Packhiker
07-26-2016, 19:14
My (fellow?) lady hammockers, I encourage you to not wait to hammock camp until just the right group gathering occurs, as much fun that will be. Reserve a site, grab your gear, and go.

I practice hiked for the small section AT hike I just did at Petit Jean State Park in AR. I stayed in my RV, but was social with other campers, including a couple of guys hammocking, which is how I got exposed to hammocks.
They always had a crowd of folks interested in their hammocks and were generous in sharing info. I've found that to be a common trait amongst hikers and campers. Next time I hike in AR, in fact in a couple of days, I'll have my hammock.

I will say that on the AT, nobody wants to be your daddy and rescue you if you're clueless on the trail, which I practically was. Early on, everybody's tired and messing around with their own set up. But you'll master it, (well enough) as I did and that's such a great feeling!

If you feel the need to be surrounded by knowledgeable women as you start out, that's a good plan too. In Texas, there are at least two large groups of cool women who camp out together. If you happen to be the only person with hammock, chances are someone can contribute a useful skill.

Anyway, once you get just a little bit of experience, your confidence will built and this whole new world is yours for the taking. Have fun!

ADVStrom14
07-28-2016, 09:13
My (fellow?) lady hammockers, I encourage you to not wait to hammock camp until just the right group gathering occurs, as much fun that will be. Reserve a site, grab your gear, and go.

This is so true!

I am relatively new to hammocking and I have no one to go with me. So instead of waiting I just hit the woods solo.

I have read all 28 pages off this thread and have loved it! So glad to have a woman's thread to follow since everything I've learned I've learned the hard way or YouTube!

I'm in eastern nc and would love to get together with some of you some time. Have motorcycle and hammock, will travel!

Jes

Junebugdawn
07-28-2016, 09:44
Ladies, I would like to personally invite all of you on behalf of Palmetto State Hangers to come to our Fall Sprawl 2016 hang in October. This is a GREAT way to meet other hangers, try out different set ups, attend various demonstrations, check out some vendors and enjoy the great outdoors. I hope to see you there. Here is the thread: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=127777

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ADVStrom14
07-28-2016, 11:08
Ladies, I would like to personally invite all of you on behalf of Palmetto State Hangers to come to our Fall Sprawl 2016 hang in October. This is a GREAT way to meet other hangers, try out different set ups, attend various demonstrations, check out some vendors and enjoy the great outdoors. I hope to see you there. Here is the thread: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=127777

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That looks like fun! Sad that I will be out of town that weekend. [emoji17]

Jes

Treeshadow
07-28-2016, 14:19
New Jersey lady hammocker here :shades: saying hi. Great ladies forum. Enjoy reading the other forums pages also. Great souce of information. I started hanging a few years ago and am always looking to get out. Had a friend try my WWB xl and she went out the next week and bought her own Hennesey. My son built me a portable when I get down to the Assateque State park with the wild ponies. (not allowed to use trees) not that they really have many to hang from anyway. Breaks down and fits in my old ski bag. Looking to get up to Maine for the Lobster hang this year.

Keep this going ladies.

Sarah

captaincoupal
08-01-2016, 10:59
Hey ladies - Jonathan from the HYOH Podcast here. If you're subscribed to this thread, you might enjoy this month's podcast, we did a ladies only round table with lilprincess hosting the discussion (she started this thread). You can listen to the podcast here (http://www.hyohpodcast.com/ladies-round-table), or learn more about the podcast from this month's announcement, here (https://hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/127941-Hang-Your-Own-Hang-Podcast-Episode-11-(Ladies-Round-Table)-Released!). Thanks for listening!

ADVStrom14
08-01-2016, 20:08
Was reading the "12 nights a year (https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/115124-12-nights-a-year?highlight=nights)" thread tonight and it got me to thinking about something like that for us ladies. I posted the idea HERE (https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/127965-12-Nights-for-the-Ladies?p=1658785#post1658785). Let me know if you are interested!

captaincoupal
08-01-2016, 20:09
If you can get folks interested in it, that would be an interesting podcast in 12 months.


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ADVStrom14
08-01-2016, 20:16
I'm hoping to get some ladies involved! I'm going to challenge myself to do it either way.

BTW, I was listening to your latest podcast today (before my phone died) and it was great! Lots of good information!

captaincoupal
08-02-2016, 09:58
I'm hoping to get some ladies involved! I'm going to challenge myself to do it either way.

BTW, I was listening to your latest podcast today (before my phone died) and it was great! Lots of good information!

Thanks for the compliment. I hope that some of the men who listen to it can share it with their significant others (spouses/daughters/etc...) and get more folks out into the woods!

ShooTa
08-07-2016, 11:33
Chap checking in - loved the podcast but actually dropped in to thank you ladies for earlier comments which i took to my lady for her hammocking - especially when we went to norway last year - so keep up the great work.

edit - ive been told to add the following re changing.
Laura undoes shoes (so she can slip them off) - then unbuckles and drops trousers (pants) to knees as she sits down barebottomed (one swift motion) then can cover with a top or scarf any exposed flesh - before slipping shoes off removing whatever needs changing from legs - and then does it in reverse to be changed. I believe shug did a video showing a very similar process.

Country Roads
08-07-2016, 18:14
I may have to give this 12 nights a year a try. I managed 10 months last year. Got 'em all but Jan and Feb. This year also did not get Jan and Feb. Here in WV, I will have to choose my nights carefully to avoid waking up frozen stiff, since I only have gear rated to 20. I have hung down to 17 degrees and high wind, and I did stay warm, so who knows. Yep, something to keep in mind.

ADVStrom14
08-07-2016, 20:46
I may have to give this 12 nights a year a try. I managed 10 months last year. Got 'em all but Jan and Feb. This year also did not get Jan and Feb. Here in WV, I will have to choose my nights carefully to avoid waking up frozen stiff, since I only have gear rated to 20. I have hung down to 17 degrees and high wind, and I did stay warm, so who knows. Yep, something to keep in mind.

I am wondering how I am going to do when it gets cold. I am not a cold weather person but I'm going to use the challenge to force myself to get over it. I have an UQ and will have a TQ soon! Can't wait to see your posts!

Tarheelsue
08-13-2016, 12:12
Wondering if there are any lady hikers in my neck of the woods? (southwest Virginia?)

Artista
08-14-2016, 09:45
Great thread! As a newbie, very useful tips and advice here.

Regarding privacy, once I got to a certain age--and after many horsecamping trips where peeing just off the trail on all-day rides is often a thing (because equines tend not to like being separated from each other, some are not good about being tied, etc.)--it ceased to even be a concern. I do like that Undress idea though and am looking thru my closet with some DIY in mind.

Also am very grateful to be well past the age of having to factor in dealing with periods anymore...one less thing to worry about.

ken&me
09-01-2016, 15:41
Wondering if there are any lady hikers in my neck of the woods? (southwest Virginia?)

check trail dames

Daisypetal
12-04-2016, 19:21
Wondering what you find are comfortable as far as socks and hiking boots go. I asked for a pair of Keen hikers for Christmas after trying them on. Hoping for a size bigger thinking wool socks might be a good idea. Advice welcome!

Bossy Bear
12-04-2016, 19:35
I love my Salomon X Ulta GTX hiking shoes for here in the Pacific NW, I also like the Columbia and Wigwam hiking socks.

lilprincess
12-04-2016, 21:58
I buy nothing but darn tough for my socks. And I have Montrail trail runners. But we don't have wet feet all the time. My favorite waterproof ones are the Merrell moabs. Awesome hiking boots

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SpaceCase
12-28-2016, 03:12
I'm not from Virginia, but I will be hiking on the AT in southwest Virginia for a few weeks next summer.

Country Roads
12-31-2016, 16:10
Wondering what you find are comfortable as far as socks and hiking boots go. I asked for a pair of Keen hikers for Christmas after trying them on. Hoping for a size bigger thinking wool socks might be a good idea. Advice welcome!

I like Keens. I do usually get them a half size larger, they seem to fit better that way. I also like LL Beans trail model hikers, although mine are an older model. I also tend to wear Cabela's brand too. They are well made and comparable in price. I usually go and actually try hikers on, since it seems every manufacturer sizes them a bit different. Some shoes have a very curved last, and those are the ones that I get a larger size in. I use socks from cabala's too; usually mid-weight, but sometimes really light socks that I use in shoes that are more like trail runners.

P-Dub
01-02-2017, 14:33
When hanging out in cold weather, do not wear insulated coveralls unless you are sure you won't have to pee in the night!!

Daisypetal
01-17-2017, 22:53
Thanks for the responses on footwear. I am now the wearer of a pair of comfy Keen hiking shoes. Next purchase will be socks then a good knife.

My ripstop fabric arrived and one of my boys will have a hammock made by me too. What a great relaxing adventure this has become.

sueb2b
01-20-2017, 22:14
I'm a big fan of the CostCo Kirkland trail socks. They're about $12 for 4 pair, and have a pretty good % of wool. Plus they're comfy and warm.

ETA: Also a big fan of Keens. They're my brand for hikers, work shoes, and sandals.

juniper
01-20-2017, 22:25
I'm not from Virginia, but I will be hiking on the AT in southwest Virginia for a few weeks next summer.

That's my plan, too. Damascus to Carver's Gap or Erwin. Look for my very purple underquilt : )

jellyfish
01-20-2017, 22:50
I'm a big fan of the CostCo Kirkland trail socks. They're about $12 for 4 pair, and have a pretty good % of wool. Plus they're comfy and warm.

ETA: Also a big fan of Keens. They're my brand for hikers, work shoes, and sandals.

I totally agree about the costco socks. Can never have too many of these!


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jellyfish
01-20-2017, 22:52
When hanging out in cold weather, do not wear insulated coveralls unless you are sure you won't have to pee in the night!!

Omg. Hahaha. My niece (age 7) wants to go backpacking with me. She is not yet catching on to the cathole idea. Explaining this has brought me joy to no end.


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P-Dub
01-24-2017, 21:37
:shades: ;)

dunestunes
02-22-2017, 21:19
Hi all, jumping into this thread almost 300 posts in (pretty new to the forum)... but I'm curious how many lady hammockers are using a 3/4 underquilt versus a full-length underquilt.

I'm strongly considering making the transition from pad to underquilt in the hopes that I'll be warmer, more comfortable, and able to push my hammocking exploits earlier into the spring and later into the fall. I think I'm pretty much decided on a 20 degree quilt from Hammock Gear (maybe with an ounce or two of overfill), but I can't seem to make up my mind re: 3/4 or full length.

On one hand I'm shorter than most guys (5'4"), so the 3/4 pad would cover more of me than it would a guy and a small pad would easily cover my feet without leaving any gaps. On the other hand, I also have lower blood pressure than most guys (i.e. my feet are always freezing), so maybe a full length quilt would be a safer bet -- especially since it doesn't seem to add too much weight.

Right now I'm leaning towards full-length, but yesterday I was leaning 3/4... so I'd love to hear people's experiences with one/the other/both.

lilprincess
02-22-2017, 21:23
Hi all, jumping into this thread almost 300 posts in (pretty new to the forum)... but I'm curious how many lady hammockers are using a 3/4 underquilt versus a full-length underquilt.

I'm strongly considering making the transition from pad to underquilt in the hopes that I'll be warmer, more comfortable, and able to push my hammocking exploits earlier into the spring and later into the fall. I think I'm pretty much decided on a 20 degree quilt from Hammock Gear (maybe with an ounce or two of overfill), but I can't seem to make up my mind re: 3/4 or full length.

On one hand I'm shorter than most guys (5'4"), so the 3/4 pad would cover more of me than it would a guy and a small pad would easily cover my feet without leaving any gaps. On the other hand, I also have lower blood pressure than most guys (i.e. my feet are always freezing), so maybe a full length quilt would be a safer bet -- especially since it doesn't seem to add too much weight.

Right now I'm leaning towards full-length, but yesterday I was leaning 3/4... so I'd love to hear people's experiences with one/the other/both.
I actually had HG make me a short version. I'm 5'2" and it is just a bit longer than me. Keeps me very warm and I can easily stretch out. The full length was to big, I couldn't keep all that insulation warm, and the 3/4 was too small.

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tollermama
02-22-2017, 21:29
Hi all, jumping into this thread almost 300 posts in (pretty new to the forum)... but I'm curious how many lady hammockers are using a 3/4 underquilt versus a full-length underquilt.

I'm strongly considering making the transition from pad to underquilt in the hopes that I'll be warmer, more comfortable, and able to push my hammocking exploits earlier into the spring and later into the fall. I think I'm pretty much decided on a 20 degree quilt from Hammock Gear (maybe with an ounce or two of overfill), but I can't seem to make up my mind re: 3/4 or full length.

On one hand I'm shorter than most guys (5'4"), so the 3/4 pad would cover more of me than it would a guy and a small pad would easily cover my feet without leaving any gaps. On the other hand, I also have lower blood pressure than most guys (i.e. my feet are always freezing), so maybe a full length quilt would be a safer bet -- especially since it doesn't seem to add too much weight.

Right now I'm leaning towards full-length, but yesterday I was leaning 3/4... so I'd love to hear people's experiences with one/the other/both.

Hi Dunestunes,

I am short at barely 5 feet tall but I have a full length quilt. I initially tried a 1/2 quilt but did not love it. I move around at night a lot and somehow it doesn't work that well for me with a pad at my feet, it slips out. I have a 20 degree with 2 oz of overstuff from HG and I like it. I feel it isn't that much bigger or heavier (I am not a gram weenie). I am into comfort. One thing you should check out though is how cold you tend to be and the lowest temp you will be camping. That should be an ok temp rating for you with the overstuff, and of course your feet will be warm if you have a good top quilt or sleeping bag. You could also get down booties if your feet get cold. You will thank yourself for getting off a pad. When my pad stayed in place it was comfy, but it never did stay in place. Good luck and hope this helps.

dunestunes
02-22-2017, 21:34
I actually had HG make me a short version. I'm 5'2" and it is just a bit longer than me. Keeps me very warm and I can easily stretch out. The full length was to big, I couldn't keep all that insulation warm, and the 3/4 was too small.

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Huh, that option hadn't even occurred to me. How much longer than you is the quilt in inches? Looks like their official "short" version is 73", meaning its almost a foot longer than I am tall.

dunestunes
02-22-2017, 21:47
Hi Dunestunes,

I am short at barely 5 feet tall but I have a full length quilt. I initially tried a 1/2 quilt but did not love it. I move around at night a lot and somehow it doesn't work that well for me with a pad at my feet, it slips out. I have a 20 degree with 2 oz of overstuff from HG and I like it. I feel it isn't that much bigger or heavier (I am not a gram weenie). I am into comfort. One thing you should check out though is how cold you tend to be and the lowest temp you will be camping. That should be an ok temp rating for you with the overstuff, and of course your feet will be warm if you have a good top quilt or sleeping bag. You could also get down booties if your feet get cold. You will thank yourself for getting off a pad. When my pad stayed in place it was comfy, but it never did stay in place. Good luck and hope this helps.

Thanks, definitely helps! How low are you able to take your quilt, temperature-wise? I've read the extra ounces of overstuff add something like 5 degrees each, curious if that's true. I definitely sleep cold and I'd like to be able to comfortably sleep down to around 20 degrees or so, as it pretty rarely drops below that here. That said, I don't know if I'd actually take advantage of that lower boundary very often. So I'm hoping a 20 degree quilt with a couple of ounces of overstuff will do the trick.

I admit to being a bit of a gram weenie sometimes (at least, when I can afford it), otherwise this wouldn't be much of a decision at all. But considering that I'd have to bring a foot pad with the 3/4 anyways, the weight difference is something like 2 or 3oz. A good night's sleep is probably worth at least that.

jellyfish
02-22-2017, 22:14
I'm a really cold sleeper and I'm 5'6". I don't think I would go with a 3/4.

gunner76
02-22-2017, 22:15
Before The Terminator ( my wife ) switched to a Ridge Runner she used a BlackBird with a 3/4 length UQ. Of course as she is 5ft 3, a 3/4 length UQ was more like a full length for her. I know she spend some nights in the low 30's in it and stayed warm.

dunestunes
02-22-2017, 23:13
I'm a really cold sleeper and I'm 5'6". I don't think I would go with a 3/4.

That seems to be the consensus, so I guess I'll probably go with the full length. Guessing I'm less likely to regret buying a full length than I am a 3/4, and that in itself is probably a pretty good indication of what I should do.


Before The Terminator ( my wife ) switched to a Ridge Runner she used a BlackBird with a 3/4 length UQ. Of course as she is 5ft 3, a 3/4 length UQ was more like a full length for her. I know she spend some nights in the low 30's in it and stayed warm.

Even without a footpad? Anyone nicknamed after an (almost) indestructible robot from the future probably has a better cold tolerance than I do.

Singingcrowsings
02-23-2017, 08:42
At 5'4"a 7/8 (66") would work. I'm 5'7.5" and got a 71" UQ from UGQ and it's a few inches longer than I need, but I like a little wiggle room.

I prefer full-length (for me), because my heels get cold, unless it's 70˚F or higher, and I don't use a pillow.

slugbait
02-23-2017, 11:53
I vote for a full length underquilt that fits you. I don't like wrestling with a foot pad (it keeps slipping out of place). My 3/4 underquilt likes to pop out of place too (I'll wake up freezing in mild weather wondering why and find the quilt is not under me but beside me).

lilprincess
02-23-2017, 18:58
Huh, that option hadn't even occurred to me. How much longer than you is the quilt in inches? Looks like their official "short" version is 73", meaning its almost a foot longer than I am tall.
The extra foot for me made a huge difference. Better to go colder than warmer. The UQ is the most important in my opinion. You can change the top to the weather but a good foundation is important.

The full was too cold for me. Too much to keep warm. I'm a super cold sleeper.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

Karla "with a k"
02-23-2017, 19:19
Ladies..... we need your input on this thread....

https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/134972-Women-Speciifc-Sub-forum

tollermama
02-23-2017, 19:30
Thanks, definitely helps! How low are you able to take your quilt, temperature-wise? I've read the extra ounces of overstuff add something like 5 degrees each, curious if that's true. I definitely sleep cold and I'd like to be able to comfortably sleep down to around 20 degrees or so, as it pretty rarely drops below that here. That said, I don't know if I'd actually take advantage of that lower boundary very often. So I'm hoping a 20 degree quilt with a couple of ounces of overstuff will do the trick.

I admit to being a bit of a gram weenie sometimes (at least, when I can afford it), otherwise this wouldn't be much of a decision at all. But considering that I'd have to bring a foot pad with the 3/4 anyways, the weight difference is something like 2 or 3oz. A good night's sleep is probably worth at least that.

I should qualify my statement: I had HG make me a full length underquilt for my height (short-not 3/4) and had them make me a shorter topquilt just like LilPrincess (who told me about how she had hers done by HG). You should be fine with 20 degrees.

patenaudedanielle
04-18-2017, 04:24
Simple and easy, I wear a waterproof sportsbra and swimming bottom for underwear. Super easy to have a solar shower, or even take a quick dip in a stream or lake to clean up. Dry off a bit and put the overclothes back on. I've found this is the simplest way to keep clean and not have to worry about anyone getting a glimpse of any bit and bobs! :cool:

MoniqueWS
04-18-2017, 12:05
Any women in Oregon? Hang around the Mt Hood area?

I live in Corvallis and hang anywhere I get the chance to hang.

Ssplash
11-17-2018, 12:20
I'm so excited to see this series of threads. I know when I first got into it and I bought my chameleon the buddy of mine who was helping me out wanted to know why I bought a big black tarp and an asym cover that just had the netting on the corner. He laughed and said why? He never has a full cover. I looked back at him and said "Cause I'm a girl!" I needed somewhere to change. He had never thought about it. So far I've hung in Arizona, Indiana and Wisconsin. Next year I'm looking at doing a trip to the boundary waters. Looking forward to reading a lot here. Thank you ladies!

Karla "with a k"
11-17-2018, 13:17
I'm so excited to see this series of threads. I know when I first got into it and I bought my chameleon the buddy of mine who was helping me out wanted to know why I bought a big black tarp and an asym cover that just had the netting on the corner. He laughed and said why? He never has a full cover. I looked back at him and said "Cause I'm a girl!" I needed somewhere to change. He had never thought about it. So far I've hung in Arizona, Indiana and Wisconsin. Next year I'm looking at doing a trip to the boundary waters. Looking forward to reading a lot here. Thank you ladies!

If you are interested in "hanging" with some other female hangers, some of us will be at Da Shack hang in December.

Thread here: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/149250-WI-Da-Shack-Hangs-October-and-December-2018

Ssplash
11-17-2018, 16:36
Thank you for the invite. Sadly I cannot make it but maybe in the future I can catch up with folks!

If you are interested in "hanging" with some other female hangers, some of us will be at Da Shack hang in December.

Thread here: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/149250-WI-Da-Shack-Hangs-October-and-December-2018

JustBeHere
11-17-2018, 21:27
Ponchos. Great for changing in.

PropaneElaine
08-07-2019, 10:22
Thanks for this thread! I'm planning on backpacking with my son's Scouts BSA troop this upcoming year, and this was something I wanted to make sure I had "covered". I'm really trying to get the troop to embrace lightweight backpacking, so I don't want to bring a massive tarp with doors to change under.

Plus, we now have a girl troop that does activities with the "boy troop", so I wanted to have some backcountry recommendations to pass along to the young ladies. :)

LoonGirl
01-26-2020, 13:58
Okay, As I am new here and went back a few pages just to check - I did manage to see someone mention the UNDRESS.
I own 3. The first version is too long, the second is sporty and I take it lots of places and the 3 rd is AWESOME. It comes with a bra strap and much lighter weight fabric.

I know hiking is the land of take less, so yes - I don't really plan to take it with me on over night hikes. But car camping and kayak camping I always take it.
I can fully change clothes in the hammock, but trying to remove stinky hiking gear inside the hammock is not my idea of fun. But getting dressed in the morning is usually done while still in the hammock.

I'm glad I started looking through here. :)