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Thread: Situation...

  1. #1
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    Situation...

    My mother got me an ENO Doublenest for christmas instead of an HH, what tarp/accessories should i get for ultralight backpacking? (i already have the atlas pro straps )

  2. #2
    Member Pshaw's Avatar
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    Any brand you are looking at? Are you wanting a 4 or 3 season tarp?

  3. #3
    Thumbs's Avatar
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    Superfly is about the most versatile. CF hex or rectangular asym is probably the lightest.

  4. #4
    Senior Member trouthunter's Avatar
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    Hey from down here in the Charleston SC area.

    I'm glad you got a hammock! To be honest - the ENO DN weighs 1.5 lbs. for just the hammock (you still need bug net, tarp, etc.) so it is not in the ultralight category in my opinion.
    To continue down this path is going to take you even farther from being ultra lightweight.
    I don't know your situation, but if at all possible return the ENO and get an HH Ultralight Asym. (under 2 lbs. for the entire system) or a similar hammock.
    If that is not possible for you - go the ENO route, and enjoy hanging. I will leave it others here to recommend a tarp, etc. for the ENO.
    I used an army surplus hammock as my first hammock in the late 80's, it was heavy, but I was out in the woods having a great time despite the weight.
    I wish you all the best!
    I like to go solo - off trail - immerse myself in the area - explore - eat really well - and make it back home.

  5. #5
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    The answer is "it depends".

    Are you looking for true ultralight backpacking, where your base pack weight is under ten pounds? If so, you'll have to look at all of your gear, not just your tarp. But that's beyond the coverage of these forums, so I'll stick to tarp advice.

    You need to ask yourself what you want in a tarp. Do you want a four-season monster that will keep you dry and out of the wind in a nor'easter? Do you want the absolute lightest tarp possible? Do you want something cheap? All of these are not mutually exclusive, but tarp selection (like most outdoor gear) is a sliding scale between cost/features/weight. You can get a cheap tarp with lots of features (like doors and panel pulls), but it's going to be heavy. You can get a light tarp with lots of features, but it's going to be expensive. You can get a cheap tarp that's also light, but it's going to be tiny and not have many features.

    What kind of camping/hiking do you do? Longer days on trail mean you want light gear (as it reduces strain during the day and you won't be in camp very long other than to sleep, so the potential lack of features means less). Longer nights in camp mean you want comfortable gear (as the extra features are worth it and the extra weight won't be carried for as long).

    What kind of weather do you intend on being out in? If you're only a fair weather, weekend camper (where you can rely on the weather reports to be somewhat accurate for a couple of days), you won't need too much in the way of precipitation shelter. If you're on a thru-hike or are a stubborn git like me, you're going to want something that can stand up to pretty much anything mother nature can throw at you.

    What kind of budget do you have? If you can burn money, you can buy the latest, greatest stuff. If you're living on $100/week, you need to save your pennies and figure out what will get the job done with the least spent.

    All of these are questions that you should ask yourself before choosing a tarp. Then comes research to compare tarps with similar feature sets, weights, and coverage.

    Hope it helps!
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  6. #6
    sargevining's Avatar
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    For Ultralight backpacking, you've got all you need except a tarp and some DEET. A Hennessy Hex is a good choice, as is a Tadpole or any of those made by the cottage guys.

    You might want to add a bug net. A HUG from Arrowhead Equipment:

    http://www.arrowhead-equipment.com/s...G_Bug_Net.html

    is likely the lightest choice.

  7. #7
    New Member
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    i was looking at ENO or HH, 1 season

  8. #8
    New Member
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    well haha im 15 so i get money anywhere i can get so about 100 a month

  9. #9
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    If you haven't done so already, be sure to read up on bottom insulation. Specifically pads versus quilts in a hammock. You'll need one or the other except in pretty warm conditions (>65-70F). Derek Hansen's book "The Ultimate Hang" is a good way to spend your first $10-15. You'll pick up lots of good tips in there.

    Given your presumed lack of experience (not a bad thing) and budget I wouldn't shoot for ultra-light. I'd shoot for best bang for the buck and the most versatile gear. Once you know you love backpacking, and you've got more money coming in, then you can start obsessing over and collecting high tech ultra lightweight gear. At your age (assuming no injuries) you won't notice a couple extra pounds in your pack. The ENO DN is a good start. Lots of us started with that same hammock. I hope you enjoy it!

  10. #10

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    Another option that would drop some weight without a ton of cost would be to swap out the suspension if you feel the need to tinker a bit. Those atlas straps and carabiners don't pack up nearly as small and aren't nearly as light as something like a tree strap and whoopie sling or dutch's speed hook. I'd try out the stuff you've got already and figure out how it works for you then look at where you want to put your money. I'd tend to think funds will be your greatest limiting factor vs weight.

    I got on just fine in the late summer with no tarp and no bug netting in NC but I found I got cold pretty easily so I added a sleeping pad and sleeping bag that I had from tent camping to try to keep warm. I think regardless of the bugs or the potential for rain, you'll find that you're wanting something to keep you warm pretty early on. You may also find that, if you have things like a sleeping pad, that you end up wanting an inexpensive dual layered hammock to keep the pad in place. You might find something as inexpensive as a Yukon Woot deal for $20 will give you that dual layered option and let you toss a $15 walmart sleeping pad in the bottom.

    Given nearly unlimited funds, I personally would end up with a enclosed hammock like the Hammeck Envy (~$180) that gives you bug net as well as a solid top, a nice down top quilt and bottom quilt to keep warm (~$200-250 each) since down is lighter and packs smaller than synthetic, and a nice tarp with doors ($150+). I'd add a smaller tarp just for some versatility ($100) so I can pack smaller and lighter when weather allows. While this would be something I'd rather have than an hammock with a sleeping pad tossed in the bottom and an unzipped sleeping bag tossed over me, coming up with the $800 or so that I'd wrap up in this setup can be a challenge for anyone.

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