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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Thorough tutorial on identifying dead trees?

    Of all the safety tips with hammocks, it seems like the one big one is don't hang from dead trees. My guess is some trees look obviously dead, but do all, especially at night?

    If there is already a thorough tutorial (in the forums or elsewhere) on how to identify dead trees you shouldn't hang from, could you point me to it? If no one knows of a thorough tutorial, could someone make one (either post in here, preferably with pics, or make a youtube video or something)? I think it would benefit a lot of us.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    No leaves in summer or leaf buds in winter

    The smaller twigs are the first to rot away so if the branches look sort of stumpy where new growth should be emerging, its probably dead.

    likewise of the ground is littered with lots of branches compared to the rest of the forest floor, ask why.

    Its likely to have sections of exposed heartwood from a wound although this can also appear on live trees

    Mushrooms growing out the sides are a good indicator although they can appear on dead sections of an otherwise live and healthy tree

    Wounds on many trees like Oak will weep a dark tanning that makes it look like the tree is bleeding pepsi that's soaking into the bark and drying in. A wound does not mean the tree is dead, but its an indicator it may have large dead sections.

    If you see squirrels or woodpeckers or other similar animals going in and out of holes in the tree top, the inside at least is likely rotted and the tree needs more careful consideration at best.

    There are probably exceptions it all of these but they provide clues if nothing else.

  3. #3
    rhjanes's Avatar
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    Mistletoe in the tree also is a bad thing to see. We just had to have a large old Elm removed. It had mistletoe for years. Branches dying and breaking. I commented to the tree guy about that the mistletoe was even looking less in the tree. He said yeah, because the tree is almost dead, stuff kills the host (the elm). We had stubs of mistletoe even out the trunk. Not a good sign. They took down one of the healthiest looking branches and 50 percent of the inside, was GONE. And yeah, the woodpeckers were on that tree from sun up to sun down (eating the bugs there were in it due to all the dead from mistletoe)
    Call me Junior

    Pirating Corporate Takeover without the paperwork
    "For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away" Bryan Adams....
    "Hammock hangs are where you go into the woods to meet men you've only known on the internet so you can sit around a campfire to swap sewing tips and recipes." - sargevining on HF

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    Since I started tree climbing, I've become much more aware of overall tree health. Once you get up in them, it's surprising how many limbs don't look near as good as they did from the ground.

    Once I look a tree over and it looks good, I knock on the trunk all the way around. Forget about it if it has any hollow sounds.

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    im a forester her in the UK so i can give some tips - but not as muchas a trained tree-surgeon or tree inspector.

    milstoe is not a 100% factor- as it has a sybiotic relationship with the tree.

    generally any fungus obvious growths from the tree are a bad sign - Lichen however is a good sign of air quality.
    beech trees if compromised by squirrels are always dodgy.
    any pines/ softwoods that have been recently felled near/in (thinning) can also pose a hazard as the newly opened spaces are ripe for wind damage/blowdowns

    mucb older trees especially oaks/beech/elm/sycamore all die at the heart but will remain structurally viable so again its more of a visible inspection.
    also as others have siad weeping wounds (usually black in colour are not a good sign.)

  6. #6
    fallkniven's Avatar
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    Thats something you learn building fires. You need to call to your inner firebug....

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