Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Ridgeline ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Drybones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Gadsden, AL
    Posts
    173

    Ridgeline ?

    I have a 1.1 ripstop 11' hammock I plan to use for the CT, two questions:

    Is Zing-it adequate for the ridgeline, I'm concerned about abrasion on the fabric as well as strength.
    Is 1.1 tough enough to handle 30 days on the trail.

    I'm 6'1", 180 lb.

  2. #2
    Thom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Hammock
    Thommock
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings
    Posts
    638
    I'm sure it would work fine. I prefer dynaglide or amsteel for ridgelines. I can't speak as to the abrasion of the rope on 1.1oz ripstop as I've never used it before. I wouldn't think it would do any more damage than other ropes.

  3. #3
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    Dutch PolyD
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG 0, 20, 40
    Suspension
    Dutch Speed Hook
    Posts
    8,502
    Images
    3
    I'm 5'11" and 165 lbs. - I've never used anything but Zing-It 1.75 mm for my ridgelines (well, except that one moment when I thought 2.2 mm was better).
    “The way to see by Faith is to shut the eye of Reason.” - Benjamin Franklin

  4. #4
    Richard Tipton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    Digital Camo GG
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Suspension
    Speed Hooks!
    Posts
    637
    I'm just over 225 and 1.75 works fine for me. If hung properly, there shouldn't be that much weight on the ridgeline.
    "Never corner anything meaner than you are...."-Unknown

  5. #5
    Are we there yet? Ridge_Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Trenton, Ohio
    Hammock
    WBBB xlc,Dutch,DIY
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    HG UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies/Huggers
    Posts
    255
    Images
    17
    I use 1.75 on all my CRL's. Works just fine.
    As messed up as a soup sandwich

  6. #6
    Senior Member Drybones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Gadsden, AL
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Tipton View Post
    I'm just over 225 and 1.75 works fine for me. If hung properly, there shouldn't be that much weight on the ridgeline.
    A hammock has a small range of tree distance that will allow for what would be called a proper hang, sometimes we have to settle for what's available. In the east that's not much of an issue, but I'm going out west in higher elevations and concerned I may be hanging in situations that put a lot of stress on the ridgeline.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Drybones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Gadsden, AL
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by Drybones View Post
    A hammock has a small range of tree distance that will allow for what would be called a proper hang, sometimes we have to settle for what's available. In the east that's not much of an issue, but I'm going out west in higher elevations and concerned I may be hanging in situations that put a lot of stress on the ridgeline.
    Plus, I'm new to hammocks and don't know what I'm doing....yet.

  8. #8
    New Member MattK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Arvada, CO
    Hammock
    10ft NylonD 1.0
    Tarp
    SilNy Hex
    Insulation
    CS Apex Wearable
    Suspension
    DG Whoopies
    Posts
    11
    A zing-it ridgeline should be fine for you. I am 6', 190lb and I have been using the 1.8mm Techline from DIY Gear Supply for a while now with no issues whatsoever. I use a UCR style adjustable structural ridge line too, and tested it on some very sub-optimal hangs. No slipping, no snapping. No experience with 1.1 ripstop though.

    In my experience there is actually a very wide range tree distance that allows for a "proper" hang. It does take a bit to get a feel for how to achieve it. For instance, with my current 9' hammock with dynaglide whoopie slings (each made of 12.5' total of line) and 6' tree straps, I can go as close as about 10' and as far as about 20', depending on tree size. My advice would be to start taking your hammock on all your day hikes, and maybe to work too for some lunch break naps, and practice setting it up in all sorts of scenarios: on hill sides, short spans, long spans, big trees little trees. As a rule of thumb, usually start by placing my tree straps around eye level for the 12-15' spans. If it is longer, I shift the tree straps up, shorter, they slide down. This is an eye-balling process that I suck at and usually takes a while, but I am getting better. Give yourself some time to figure out your system.

    Speaking of, what is your suspension system?

    I have spent a lot of time on the CT and on Colorado trails more generally. You will be hanging off ponderosa and lodgepole for almost the entire trail. Maybe some aspen thrown in. The ponderosa in particular can get pretty huge, so I would account for at least 6' of strap, just for the tree, and would actually recommend you bring some suspension extensions in case you do find yourself trying to span long distances or use really big trees. You will have to plan a little more carefully than I did when I used my ground set up. There are some pretty significant chunks of trail above tree line. Maybe one of these days I will do the whole trail with a hammock set up. It would probably be a whole different experience.

  9. #9
    Richard Tipton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    Digital Camo GG
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Suspension
    Speed Hooks!
    Posts
    637
    Quote Originally Posted by Drybones View Post
    A hammock has a small range of tree distance that will allow for what would be called a proper hang, sometimes we have to settle for what's available. In the east that's not much of an issue, but I'm going out west in higher elevations and concerned I may be hanging in situations that put a lot of stress on the ridgeline.
    I totally disagree with this! My mimum distance is 12' and I've gone up to 20' without undue stress on my ridgeline. An overly tight ridgeline means you got issues with the suspension as well.
    "Never corner anything meaner than you are...."-Unknown

  10. #10
    New Member willys05tj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Laurinburg, NC
    Hammock
    Dutchwaregear 1.6 Nylon D
    Tarp
    Kelty Noah 12
    Insulation
    S/B, ThermoRest
    Suspension
    WHOOPIE
    Posts
    4
    Richard, can you explain? I'm just getting into hammocking as well, and would like to know how to set up properly as well. I have a Dutchwaregear 1.6 nylon D 11', with whoopie sling suspension and a Zing It whoopie ridge line. How tight should it be when I set up and then lay in the hammock?

Similar Threads

  1. Need easy-release knot to shorten ridgeline without removing ridgeline
    By motorapido in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-18-2015, 21:58
  2. Continuos Ridgeline vs 2 piece Ridgeline
    By chulabooner in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-07-2014, 15:17
  3. Ridgeline help
    By Just swingin in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-29-2012, 15:42
  4. eno ridgeline
    By juddmyers in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 11-22-2011, 17:53
  5. Tarp ridgeline under/over/no ridgeline
    By NickJ in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-13-2010, 08:53

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •