View Poll Results: How many tries/prototypes does it take you to get a project/idea off the ground?

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  • 1-2

    5 38.46%
  • 3-4

    4 30.77%
  • 5-6

    0 0%
  • 7 plus.......

    4 30.77%
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  1. #11
    Senior Member XexorZ's Avatar
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    This can only go back and forth so many times ... but you can only simulate (mentally or with tools) so far - reality is the acid test ;-)

  2. #12
    Senior Member PuckerFactor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacEntyre View Post
    Prototypes are not products that you made incorrectly. They are products that show a deficiency in the design, something you would not have known about unless you implemented the design and put it to use.
    True, but I tend to mull projects over in my head for weeks before I ever touch the scissors or saw or whatever.
    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Skye View Post
    Careful contemplation (virtual/imagined prototyping, as it were) can save resources and often bypass physical prototyping but it may take more time.
    Thanks Albert, this is more what I meant to say.

    Acer
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

  3. #13
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Sounds like several Mozarts are among us!

    Another reason I made 7 prototypes was to have six other people help me field test the product.

    - MacEntyre
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
    www.MollyMacGear.com

  4. #14
    Frawg's Avatar
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    How many prototypes? ...just one more!
    - Frawg

    {generic tagline}

  5. #15
    Senior Member te-wa's Avatar
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    are ex-girlfriends considered "prototypes"?
    new site! new gear! www.tewaunderquilts.com
    follow me on facebook!

  6. #16
    Merganser's Avatar
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    I think a lot depends on what counts as a prototype? Does it have to require new materials? Does it have to be a complete work?

    On both my BB clone and my UQ did a lot of partial prototyping. I think it took 3 hammock body prototypes. For the UQ I did 2 single fabric layer prototypes trying out dart patterns. In both cases there were things I only did on the final version (actually that was most of the UQ) and there are things I'd do a bit differently if I did it again. But I did enough with prototypes to predict the rest and the results on both projects were good. A purist would say these are both still prototypes and I have yet to make a production model.

  7. #17
    RootCause's Avatar
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    I spend a lot of time thinking through the project before I ever touch scissors, metal, wood, etc. Normally my first <item> prototype is rushed in the making, becoming something functional but ugly.... it's my practice piece! Then, with the initial excitement over, I can settle down and more patiently make a second <item> that works and looks as good as I mean for it to.

    Exceptions: my first hammock is still in use as is. Wait, that's not true. I went back, undid the whipping, hemmed the edges, and re-whipped. Is that now considered version 1.1? Or still 1.0?

    I'm loving alcohol stoves now- rapid prototyping! I no longer buy beverages based on flavor, but instead on the can they come in!!

  8. #18
    Frawg's Avatar
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    Okay, serious answer...

    It really all depends. If I knew everything, I would never need to prototype. It's the lack of knowledge that makes prototyping necessary. And we never really know what we don't know until it makes itself known, often unpleasantly.

    I rarely make fewer than 3, in phases, as follows:

    First I think long and hard about what I'm trying to accomplish, then research how others have gone about it, as well as whatever special knowledge I need to gain to be able to solve the problem. 82.947% () of the solution lies in correctly defining the problem.

    Once I have a general idea of what I need to do, I look for critical areas that have to work for the overall concept to be successful. I may set up one or more 'spike' tests or partial prototypes to evaluate these criticalities. Here's where new knowledge often appears. Here I make a go / no go / defer decision.

    After satisfying myself that a solution exists, I'll then make a rough but functional prototype. The key here is to figure out how to go about properly making the thing. Here's where I often discover that I really didn't understand something in the first place. My first experiments with UCRs in the original thread went this way, for example. At this point I will either drop the idea, go back to the drawing board or press on with a third phase.

    In the next phase I try to optimize the design by experimenting with whatever parameters can be adjusted. This could easily involve making several 'prototypes'. At the end of this phase I make a final go/no go decision.

    In the last phase I focus on fabrication issues, developing the 'best' (however I define it at the time) way to put the thing together.

    At this point I have something I can now use, and I know how to replicate it for replacement or for someone else.

    I'm not sure how that answers your question, but it's the best I can do for now.
    - Frawg

    {generic tagline}

  9. #19
    Dutch's Avatar
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    I usually go for 1 proto type and work out the all details on that. Than once I got it that far will draw things and make a list of the steps needed. This has held pretty good results. I was able to do the bridgesin with only one prototype and that was the most complex project I sewn. I tend to work things out in my head for quite a while before I start a project. Mostly that is because I have a lot of projects and it takes a while form conception to production. That and I have too much time to think about gear at work.
    Peace Dutch
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Perkolady's Avatar
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    I usually think things through a LOT before making. Thing is, I don't know if it will work well until I try it. Then, I make another with the changes I need to make. And another, and another.... whatever it takes! Never know how many times though!

    When I made my double layer hammock with zipper and netting, I was using wally fabric and supplies mostly scavenged off of other things. I really thought it would just be for 'practice' and I planned on having to redo a lot of stuff. The big surprise was having it turn out well! There's very little I will change on it when I go to make the next one.

    If you make something during a 'blue moon', it may work out the first time!
    But if not, try , try again....

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