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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Renton, WA
    Hammock
    WBBB-XLC 1.1 DL w/winter cover
    Tarp
    Warbonnet Superfly
    Insulation
    Yeti + REI sit pad
    Suspension
    Strap + Buckles
    Posts
    43

    First Night in Yeti

    Some random thoughts about my first night using the Yeti:
    It is MUCH better than a pad

    The Yeti completely surrounds you. You can move around, sleep on side, whatever. No problem. When using the pad, I was always messing with the sleeping bag to be sure it covered the edges of the pad. Any fidgeting or a pee break meant trying to readjust. The underquilt is always there and always covering me completely.

    It is very warm. I had to slide it off to one side for a bit to cool down, rotating it out of the way along the hammock centerline. You cool quickly, but heat up immediately when slide back into place. This can be done while laying in the hammock.

    The sit pad inside the sleeping bag foot works well. My feet were getting cold, then I noticed I wasnít all the way in the bag. Instant warmth when I moved.

    No problem with gap between end of Yeti and beginning of sit pad. I donít think there is a gap.

    Very comfortable, flat lay. No neck problems.

    Getting in/out no problem, though you need to slide the Yeti back into position after entry. It usually drops down about 6 inches when you climb in. Just pull it back up before zipping the bug net. A five second operation.

    The bungee cords that hold the Yeti in place are very tight and if you lay on them, it can get uncomfortable. It is a simple matter to move just a tiny amount or pull them up a bit and all is OK.

    You get a LOT more insulation. The Yeti naturally lofts underneath the hammock and that maximizes insulation more than if it was laying on top of you. It fluffs downward with e help of gravity giving you maximum loft. I use my sleeping bag, zipper down, and do not sleep on it. This doubles the bag on top of me. I was awash in down.

    It got down to 57 degrees and I was hot. I did not use the hat, down jacket, or longies. I stripped to my BVDs and a short sleep shirt and still was warm. I ended up rolling the sleeping bag back about halfway. Make no mistake though, it got cold fast if you were uncovered above and below.

    With the underquilt in place, you have the sensation of heat quickly, unlike anything I have experienced when ground dwelling.

    If you were ground dwelling, you could use the Yeti + pad and not need a sleeping bag. If I curl up on my side, I am completely covered by the Yeti. The bungees surround the pad and keep the Yeti in place on my 26" wide pad. I bet if you had a down coat, you could cover the lower half of your body. A gram Nazi would love that.

  2. #2
    Fluteman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Pink Hill, NC
    Hammock
    WBRR, WBBB XLC, DIY
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    Lynx, Yeti, Rev 20
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    269
    Images
    2
    Nice. I have a 20 and 0 deg yeti and love them both.
    Aim for the moon, if you miss, at least you will still be among the stars.

  3. #3
    gunner76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Beaufort, NC
    Hammock
    Blackbird 1.7 double
    Tarp
    HG Cuben
    Insulation
    UGQs ZEPPELIN
    Suspension
    Dutch Clips
    Posts
    8,098
    Images
    39
    It is MUCH better than a pad
    that is most hangers opinion about a UQ.
    Frosty Butt Hang Jan 2015 .................. Fat Butt Hang April 2015..........Hunger / Halloween Hang Oct 2015

    neusioktrail.org ..................... Free Hammock Classes

    I am 18 with 44 years of experience !

  4. #4
    bkrgi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Terrace BC
    Hammock
    HH DJ XL, WB Traveler
    Tarp
    HH Hex, Monsoon
    Insulation
    UGQ 20*UQ HG 40*TQ
    Suspension
    Stock HH, WB Web
    Posts
    260
    Welcome to the awesome world of Downy goodness...
    Nothing like the warmth of down as you have found out...it is a happy place
    Life is too Short to not feed the addiction....Hang on and explore the World

  5. #5
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Memphis, Tn
    Posts
    16
    I too have a yeti for my ridgerunner. And I've come to the same conclusions as you regarding a pad vs the uq. I use it upside down, with the tag end at my knees and it fits the hour glass shape of the ridgerunner perfectly. So much better than a pad.
    I have the 0 degree yeti with a 20 degree top quilt and I've taken it down to single digits with no problem wearing 250 merino long underwear and a fleece beanie and ridgerest foot pad. I do sleep pretty warm though.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ChacMool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Hammock
    WB RidgeRunner DL
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    Burrow; pads, Lynx
    Suspension
    Dutch's Cinch Bugs
    Posts
    157
    Interesting. I have a full-length 20 degree Lynx for my Ridgerunner (a double layer one), and generally prefer my inflatable pad over the underquilt (but its nice to use both, if its cold enough). The pad raises me up a bit higher in the hammock (better view), and most importantly it tends to widen the "cot" I'm lying on, so my feet aren't forced into or on top of each other. But I can see why an UQ is preferred over a pad in a gathered end hammock, like MisterS has, and also maybe for those with single-layer hammocks.

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Renton, WA
    Hammock
    WBBB-XLC 1.1 DL w/winter cover
    Tarp
    Warbonnet Superfly
    Insulation
    Yeti + REI sit pad
    Suspension
    Strap + Buckles
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by ChacMool View Post
    Interesting. I have a full-length 20 degree Lynx for my Ridgerunner (a double layer one), and generally prefer my inflatable pad over the underquilt (but its nice to use both, if its cold enough). The pad raises me up a bit higher in the hammock (better view), and most importantly it tends to widen the "cot" I'm lying on, so my feet aren't forced into or on top of each other. But I can see why an UQ is preferred over a pad in a gathered end hammock, like MisterS has, and also maybe for those with single-layer hammocks.
    I think the Ridgerunner would work well with a pad. And the pad works good with the WBBB-XLC as well, especially if you have a wider pad that the standard 20" width. My pad is about 26 inches wide. That said, the Yeti seems to always stay centered where I am and I get a flatter lay. I watched my son in the hammock with a pad and without one and his flatness difference was noticeable. There is nothing wrong with either one though.

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