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  1. #41
    New Member
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    Ridge Outdoor Gear 11'
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    Adventuridge 12'
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    Can/should you make whoopie slings, UCRs, etc. with rope other than Amsteel?

  2. #42
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknowing outdoorsman View Post
    Can/should you make whoopie slings, UCRs, etc. with rope other than Amsteel?
    It depends what you're doing with them. You can make them with any hollow-core rope (within reason: anything under ~1mm in diameter is a pain in the backside to splice). However, you should consider the loads that you're going to put on them, the strength of the cordage, and how much your splice degrades that strength. Personally, I found whoopies made out of 750lb cordage to be too marginal for me to be happy hanging off, but they work fine for adjustable ridgelines, and my tarp ridgelines are all double-ended UCRs made of 500lb cordage (purely because it's easier to splice than the thinner stuff).

  3. #43
    New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesam3 View Post
    It depends what you're doing with them. You can make them with any hollow-core rope (within reason: anything under ~1mm in diameter is a pain in the backside to splice). However, you should consider the loads that you're going to put on them, the strength of the cordage, and how much your splice degrades that strength. Personally, I found whoopies made out of 750lb cordage to be too marginal for me to be happy hanging off, but they work fine for adjustable ridgelines, and my tarp ridgelines are all double-ended UCRs made of 500lb cordage (purely because it's easier to splice than the thinner stuff).
    How do you do your double-ended UCRs? I'm very new to this and had no idea that even existed. also what kind of cordage do you use (if not amsteel)? Thanks for the help!

  4. #44
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknowing outdoorsman View Post
    How do you do your double-ended UCRs? I'm very new to this and had no idea that even existed. also what kind of cordage do you use (if not amsteel)? Thanks for the help!
    The ones on my tarp are made from kite string off Amazon, but anything with a hole down the middle that you can get a strand through works. To make them:

    1. Cut two 2' pieces of the cord, splice a small eye in one end of each.
    2. Cut a bit of cord long enough for the whole ridgeline (I tend to go longer than I want then trim it up later as needed).
    3. Bury the main line through the two short pieces, with the ends of the main line going towards the loop ends of the short pieces.
    4. Back-splice all of the loose ends to prevent fraying.
    5. Rolling hitch the loose ends of the short bits onto the main line.

    Then attach in whatever way you prefer: I tend to add a soft shackle to either end of the tarp, to both connect the end-loops of the ridgeline and run the ridgeilne itself through to keep it closer to the tarp (you could drop the soft shackles if you didn't mind not being able to easily take the ridgeline off the tarp). I use separate lines for going around the trees: some of them have hardware threaded onto the ridgeline to attach them, others have an evo loop threaded on (with one end of the tree line spliced to the evo loop, the other goes around the tree, then gets larksheaded to the evo loop).

    The double-ended bit is just so that I can adjust the length from whichever end I happen to be standing at. The separate tree cords serve three purposes:

    1. Some places where I hang require webbing on anything that ties to a tree. This makes it trivial to swap out to tree straps (or, if I want to shave grams, I just connect the evo loop/whatever to the loop of my tree straps).
    2. It means that you can easily adjust the position of the tarp, even under tension, because there's very little friction on the ridgeline.
    3. It means I can just leave the main ridgeline on the tarp with both ends tied off all the time, reducing fiddliness and tangles.

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