Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31
  1. #11
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kentucky
    Hammock
    Dual Layer WB Blackbird
    Tarp
    OES Cuben
    Insulation
    SnugFit
    Posts
    6,265
    Images
    35
    I had always that Permethrin was just an insect repelant. Does it actually kill bugs and ticks?
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



    Premium Quality, Fresh Roasted Coffee
    www.meancatcoffee.com

  2. #12
    Senior Member T-BACK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    337
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by headchange4u View Post
    I had always that Permethrin was just an insect repelant. Does it actually kill bugs and ticks?
    Permethrin is an insecticide that has almost immediate knockdown power. It is hamless to humans when dry. Even when wet, the oils on your skin will deactivate its toxic effect. That's why it is not effective if applied to skin. I certainly would not want to drink it and when I soak items in higher concentrations I do wear gloves. I've used this stuff since the middle 80's. I find it completely benign compared to burning feeling and numb lips I,ve experienced after using DEET. I too use the Repel lemon eucalyptus spray because I dislike DEET so much. I've found it works pretty well. I believe it is the only "natural" repellant endorsed by the CDC&P as effective. Be careful about all natural products. Chemicals is Chemicals no matter what you call them. Or is it a rose by any other name...anyway, even my Repel says to only apply a maximum of twice daily. I hate to any type of chemical on my skin or clothing because there is always a slight risk involved, however, I have had Lyme disease and mosquitos are vectors for quite a few nasties nowdays. In my mind the risk of disease is much more of a threat than the chemicals I choose to combat them. It's a personal decision that each of us has to make for ourselfs. I would never try to influence someone to use something just because it works for me, be it bug spray or equipment. Weigh the pros and cons of everything and if you think it might work for you, try it.
    Brian
    ...and there came to be a day, all too soon, that I became aware that I could travel no more on my long journey. Though I did not arrive where I had planned, I believe that here is exactly where I am supposed to be...

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cuffs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    467
    Images
    4
    I have used both Permethrin and Pyrethrin in my garden and flower beds...

    I have pretty much switched to solely using the Pyrethrin. My decision is based on:

    1. its natural, not man made synthetic
    2. safe to eat the veggies the same day the Pyrethrin was applied.
    3. safe for use on cats and dogs for control of fleas and ticks (and yes, it works)
    4. I see bugs un-*** the area as soon as I put the stuff out, so it must be working. And if they hang around, I find their little carcasses lying around the next day.

    The only form Ive found it is in powder... I'll going to start checking for liquid or how to use as bug repellant for peoples.
    Last edited by Cuffs; 06-14-2007 at 18:33. Reason: spelling
    Get busy living, or get busy dying.

  4. #14
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,948
    Images
    364
    They make clothes pre-soaked in permethrin, so it must not be very toxic when dry. It works great as a backyard spray, killing the bugs that don't run for their lives.supposed to be good for 3 or 4 weeks. I've also noticed far fewer ( maybe none?) fire ant beds and wasp nests around the house the last couple of years, since I started spraying occasionally with permethrin.

    The Eucalyptus stuff seems to work pretty good as a repellent, but quite a strong smell. Still a far more tolerable smell and sensation then deet, but even stronger in it's own way.

    My current favorite is picariden(sp?). I don't know if this is natural or chemical. It seems to work pretty good at ( I think it was) 10%, and even better at 15%. Both consumer reports and backpaker mag recently tested all these bug repellents. The higher concentrations were needed for picariden. Avon makes some stuff my wife bought, with only 10%. It has worked for me for at least short periods of time. And it has a completely pleasant smell that is not a strong smell. I don't mind spraying it on at all.

    Either Con.Report or Backpacker(or both) tested permethrin clothing along with the sprays, and they didn't seem to work very well, for what it is worth.

    I need to look into this "Pyrethrin" stuff AlHikerGal speaks of.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    142
    I'd say, first of all, find out if you need to use it. The only time I've ever had mosquitoes poke through a hammock is when using loosely woven fabric such as netting - which I no longer do. I don't know whether most hammocks are proof against mosquitoes. I'm sure Hennessey's and my home made ones are.

    I have applied Permethrin to net and very loose nylon hammocks and it worked OK. However, it is not as durable on nylon as on some other fabrics, so it needs to be reapplied now and then.
    Last edited by Spock; 08-29-2008 at 12:35.

  6. #16
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by Spock View Post
    I don't know whether most hammocks are proof against mosquitoes. I'm sure Hennessey's and my home made ones are.
    I can tell you from first-hand personal experience that mosquitos are more than able to 'poke through' a HH Explorer UL. That very issue is how I came to know of this forum.
    “I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt.” - Cormac McCarthy

  7. #17
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Agree with angrysparrow, not the reason I came to the Forum, but certainly the cause for me looking into Permethrin. My first trip out with my HH Explorer in Florida was a rude awakening; I thought I'd be safe from bugs sleeping directly on the hammock fabric.
    Trust nobody!

  8. #18
    Senior Member te-wa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    arizona
    Hammock
    BB
    Tarp
    zpacks cuben
    Insulation
    te-wa Freeze
    Suspension
    whoOpie slings
    Posts
    1,396
    Images
    129
    last year I spent some time on a commercial flight chatting with a chemist, who then worked for Dow*. We discussed Permethrin and its pros/cons and he only told me that it is not a great idea to inhale the mist when sprayed. Against skin, not a problem. In that respect, you are going to spend a great deal more money and heartache dealing with Lyme disease.

    *dow does not manufacture permethrin products, but he seemed to be highly aware of its properties.
    fish are highly sensitive (read: it kills them) to permethrin so thats an option if your flies arent catching any. (kidding, dude)
    new site! new gear! www.tewaunderquilts.com
    follow me on facebook!

  9. #19
    neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    nashville,tennessee
    Hammock
    DD modular jungle hammock
    Tarp
    wilderness logics
    Insulation
    wilderness logics
    Suspension
    whoopie sling
    Posts
    4,278
    Images
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by NutellaTheHun View Post
    I just read a post here, on HammockForums.net. In the post the member stated that he was thinking of applying permethrin to the bottom and bug net portion of his hammock. I was curious so I googled permethrin.
    I found this article...

    http://www.safe2use.com/poisons-pest...report/cox.htm

    I have only skimmed it, so I may have missed something, but from the little bits I read it does NOT sound like a nice thing to have right next to ones face.
    I am not trying to start a controversy here. I am just curious what others have to say.

    Thanks
    its not dangerous if used as directed,i mainly use it in main tick seasonneo
    the matrix has you

  10. #20
    Senior Member Walking Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fairbury NE
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY 11x10
    Insulation
    DIY UQ & down bag
    Posts
    855
    This site has health studies on workers that have been exposed
    http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/si...@rn+52645-53-1
    No reaction in most studies, some skin irration in some.

Similar Threads

  1. When does windy become dangerous?
    By makkan in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-01-2014, 10:53
  2. it's dangerous but I've been thinking
    By ratrodder69 in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-20-2014, 12:49
  3. Dangerous
    By SimonMc in forum Dutchware
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-16-2013, 12:38
  4. This Place is Dangerous
    By Oklahoma_Mike in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-05-2011, 10:56
  5. Isn't this a bit dangerous?
    By Tobit in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-21-2008, 22:26

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •