Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3111213
Results 121 to 127 of 127
  1. #121
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    DIY 11' (Hexon 2.4)
    Tarp
    Oak Creek(for now)
    Insulation
    DIY CDT Underquilt
    Suspension
    Web/Marlin Spike
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    I've tried tape and the answer is no. You are either going to have to sew it or turn to a layering approach.
    Hello leiavoia! You authored one of the other Costco threads that I was reading in depth (GEMINI Underquilt)
    I tend to sleep cold - so I was actually considering the potential advantages of both Faux Baffles and layering (depending on the temperature.)

    If I were to make an attempt, I was thinking of trying some sort of 3M VHB Tape like this tape from Dutchgear:
    https://dutchwaregear.com/cuben-fibe...l#tab-product1
    If similar approachces have been tried and failed - then I will just learn that from the communal wisdom here.


    I may just need to give sewing them a try once I get that far.

    @GadgetUK437 - it looks like you have since harvested your down and gone in a new direction....
    Is that a commentary on how well this works (or limitations of it), or just your own thirst for continuous improvements to your own gear?

  2. #122
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    402
    It's mostly about ease of development. You can sew faux baffles on a Costco blanket, but the benefits of doing so are small in relation to the work put into it. This is something you can do if you just enjoy tinkering with stuff. If you want maximum benefit, just put the sewing effort into making your own scratch built quilt and end up with a product that far exceeds anything the Costco blanket can do.

  3. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by knightshade View Post
    it looks like you have since harvested your down and gone in a new direction....
    Is that a commentary on how well this works (or limitations of it), or just your own thirst for continuous improvements to your own gear?
    Last statement just about nailed it!

    But to summarise...
    In my opinion, the faux baffles are the best way of getting the most performance out of a single CDT, without adding down, or opening up the quilt.
    What you can do with 6 - 7oz of down in a 10oz shell is always gonna be limited. The best performance with one CDT was one night at 28F, but for that I took a 70x60" CDT, turned it sideways, used the 70" to made a 44" wide UQ, that gave me 26" to make faux baffles in the 13 walls between the 14 chambers, so quite deep (comparatively) baffles. I also shortened it from 60" to 50", which helped loft the chambers up nicely.
    I was less happy with the quilt where I reduced the number of chambers from 12 to 6, they were just too wide. They needed more down to get them to loft adequately, and even then (because of the width) thin spots were often a problem. The best performance from the big quilt filled with 13oz of down was 14F (-10C), But it was an inefficient use of down, and if you are gonna open things up and start stuffing down, you might as well go gonzo and do the whole job!

    I am always looking at the lightest way of doing things with the cheapest stuff. If you just want the best performance from two CDTs, but less faff, go with the Gemini setup. It's not light, it's (all up) more than 34oz, the two shells add up to 18oz on their own, then add the 13oz of down, but it is very easy to do, and very effective. Not sure how low it can go to, but had mine out to 23F.

    I sold the partial length, rather good, faux Baffled UQ, because it didn't do anything that my 20F Phoenix did better, and as a partial, wasn't a perfect loaner either. The big one got cannibalised, now I am more confident wrangling duck down, to make a more efficient full length UQ. Instead of a 70" that weighed over 27oz, using 13oz down to get to 14F I now have a, fully 3D differential cut, 78" UQ, with 14oz of down, rated to 10F, that weighs in at 25oz.

  4. #124
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    DIY 11' (Hexon 2.4)
    Tarp
    Oak Creek(for now)
    Insulation
    DIY CDT Underquilt
    Suspension
    Web/Marlin Spike
    Posts
    36
    Thank you for all of the information - it is helpful in understanding what is possible/practicle.
    From everything that I've read over the past few months, it is all about finding the right balancing point (time/effort/funding/skills/etc).

    To provide some context, I've not hammock camped in ~25 years (I used to during the summer months with my scout troop using a string hammock with a painters tarp)
    This summer, I picked up a parachute hammock - and my son and some of the other scouts asked about using it overnight.
    That rekindled my interest, so I've been reading up - and seeing just how far things have changed in the arena of hammock camping in that time.

    My goal was to be ready for some of the fall campouts - to give it a go in contrast to the tent camping that I've been doing.
    I've gotten a tarp, parts to build an 11' hammock and and some suspensions to play with.
    Where I live, nights are already dropping into the upper 40's - so some sort of insulation (pad or underquilt) seems like it will be needed (or at least recommended).
    Doing something with the Costco quilts seemed like a reasonable entry point so that I can test out the gear....

    We are generally close the the cars (<1/4 mile) - so weight isn't a huge concern.
    A part of me had been wondering if a balance point (time/performance/weight) was:
    - Take 2 quilts
    - Remove the edge "string"
    - Rip the short seams to create tubes instead of squares
    - Migrate the down to one end, and shorten it to 45 inches (concentrating the down into a smaller area)
    - Sew the two quilts together such that they create a set of offset channels
    Offset-quilt.jpg
    - Create a clew suspension for it

    Based on some of the data earlier in the thead, that should result in a quilt that is 45"x60" and about 26 oz in weight (+suspension)
    The one oddity would be that the tubes are perpendicular to the ridge line (which is uncommon for underquilts)

    It sounds like the better options will be to invest in making a properly baffled underquilt -
    but I imagine that I'll know my needs better after some nights in the hammock in cooler temperatures.

    Thanks again for the shared knowledge!

  5. #125
    Transverse chambers on UQs are not that uncommon. As long as they are not understuffed, you don't get a problem with Down settling.

    Clew suspension could be a bit weird on a partial length quilt, I think it has been discussed somewhere.
    Just had an idea pop in my head. To avoid your legs snagging on the nettles of the clew, you could make your partial length quilt impersonate a full length quilt. By adding a length of lightweight material to the foot end, to which you attach the clew (add 10 - 15" of ripstop to your 60" quilt). But some might say (especially short people) a 60" quilt isn't really partial length!

    --
    Gadget

  6. #126
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    "North Jersey"
    Hammock
    Hybrid 1.2 GE, Lux Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY Xenon Winter
    Insulation
    Loco Libre Gear
    Suspension
    All of them! Ugh.
    Posts
    1,397
    Images
    115
    I made a 3/4 clews CDT and to sum it up, i would not recommend it. Overall it works well, but is a bit of effort to keep from slipping off shoulders/feet. Often the whole thing just flips entirely off to one side. I'm currently laying in my Chameleon clone with the 3/4. I reversed the pack hooks so that they'd hold the 1/32 nettles better. The thin cords slip off the official Duthware hook orientation. That worked well as the quilt did not shift on me all night, and that's a first.

    As i recall, mine is 45" long and is about the minimum length i would use for myself. I'm 5'4". For taller folks I'd suggest closer to 50".

    I suspect a lot of folks may not care for the feel of the nettles in the lower leg/foot area. l I made mine with 16, 1/32 nettles so individually each has little tension. I can only imagine that fewer heavier cords would be even more unpleasant. That said, I've used virtually every night this summer.
    I often think to myself, if only I had an ounce of gold for every stupid thing I've ever said or done... --sqidmark

  7. #127
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    DIY 11' (Hexon 2.4)
    Tarp
    Oak Creek(for now)
    Insulation
    DIY CDT Underquilt
    Suspension
    Web/Marlin Spike
    Posts
    36
    I fear that we are deviating from the thread at hand, but I had been reading a number of threads about the clew underquilt suspension.
    A few posts mentioned the Snugfit underquilt, where instead of shock-cord/nettles a 4-way stretch material is used.
    May be interesting to consider that - especially with the feedback.
    Goes to show that there is a lot for me to learn still :-)

Similar Threads

  1. Costco Underquilt Question/Idea - Faux Baffles?
    By -c0de- in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 06-16-2017, 10:49
  2. UQ differential cut baffles. What do you do?
    By corrupt_reverend in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-24-2014, 00:19
  3. Differential baffles??
    By pathfinder in forum Bottom Insulation
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-26-2013, 16:53
  4. Differential Baffles for Top Quilt?
    By laherb in forum Top Insulation
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-25-2009, 08:33
  5. Differential baffles
    By FreeTheWeasel in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-25-2009, 22:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •