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Thread: 4x4? 4x6?

  1. #21
    Senior Member optimator's Avatar
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    I just checked out the anchors. We have a Petsmart right down the road, hopefully their in stock. Plus I'm hoping that the anchor will help keep my tarp taut.
    It's only an addiction if your trying to quit

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimator View Post
    I just checked out the anchors. We have a Petsmart right down the road, hopefully their in stock. Plus I'm hoping that the anchor will help keep my tarp taut.
    Mine doesnt stock the cable type. They do have the more expensive ones that Im currently using.

    But again... I got those for free too.

    One of the benefits of working at the end of the refuse chain.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opie View Post
    Yes.. But if you are loading the post on one side, and 180 degrees from that you have a line running to a ground anchor, you are effectively transferring most of the load to the ground anchor. The post will carry the weight down its length and the force is transferred to the tie out.

    If optimator wasnt planning on using guylines, I would support the 2' wide hole, 2' deep filled with crete.
    this is very true...i didn't catch the part about the ground anchors...
    but if the ground is loose make the hole wide ...just to be safe
    anchor or not...your weight after awhile will make the cement shift if the hole is not wide enough...at least 14-16 inchs should be good...maybe overkill...but
    rather alittle overkill..than have to pull them out and do it all over

    but i would go with your idea and pound in post to the ground..
    it's nice to just pull them out and replace them if they bend...
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  4. #24
    opie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenlespaul View Post
    this is very true...i didn't catch the part about the ground anchors...
    but if the ground is loose make the hole wide ...just to be safe
    anchor or not...your weight after awhile will make the cement shift if the hole is not wide enough...at least 14-16 inchs should be good...maybe overkill...but
    rather alittle overkill..than have to pull them out and do it all over

    but i would go with your idea and pound in post to the ground..
    it's nice to just pull them out and replace them if they bend...
    You could always set your sleeve in crete, too.

    I think post hole digger width would be plenty, though. (if your using a tie out.)
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  5. #25
    Senior Member optimator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opie View Post
    You could always set your sleeve in crete, too.

    I think post hole digger width would be plenty, though. (if your using a tie out.)
    I think I will, concrete is cheap.
    It's only an addiction if your trying to quit

  6. #26
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opie View Post
    You could always set your sleeve in crete, too.

    I think post hole digger width would be plenty, though. (if your using a tie out.)
    thats what i was going to do with mine...set them with crete ...i have semi loose soil..so i rather know there in there...than guess

    when i set my original 4x4's in i only made the holes 10" wide...and with anchors they came loose after awhile....

    and being i have set many post i should have known better and made the holes wider..and my dad said the same thing to me ..but i was thinking that i'm going to anchor them...it helped...but after awhile they will work there was loose if they are not wide enough
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  7. #27
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    To properly hold the weight your supposed to go below the frost line in the ground. It's the same way if you PROPERLY put in fence posts. In Northern Indiana, 3 -4 feet is the usual, but four feet is technically what your supposed to do. This is per the Structural engineer (my wife) and contractor is my understanding.

  8. #28
    opie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TroutEhCuss View Post
    To properly hold the weight your supposed to go below the frost line in the ground. It's the same way if you PROPERLY put in fence posts. In Northern Indiana, 3 -4 feet is the usual, but four feet is technically what your supposed to do. This is per the Structural engineer (my wife) and contractor is my understanding.
    Getting below the frost line is only to prevent heaving.

    I dont think a hammock poll heaving is a big issue. BTW, thats JMO.

    Here in MI its 42".

    Critical on things with a foundation, and water/sewer lines.
    Last edited by opie; 01-17-2010 at 13:44.
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  9. #29
    Member I Splice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimator View Post
    Thanks for the quick replies guys! But do you all think that 2' on my post sleeve will be deep enough even with the rear anchors? I plan on using pretty stout steel for my upright.....
    I'd say that depends on your anchors. Strong anchors with either preloaded or low stretch tether (I used chain) could make the load on the pole purely compressive (vertical)

  10. #30
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    I'm attaching some photos of the rig I built to hang my Sky Chair off the back deck. I originally tried steel cable between heavy steel posts in concrete two feet down, but it wouldn't work. The problem I encountered was that the downslope post had to be 10 feet tall (above ground) to get the necessary height over the deck. At that height the post becomes a huge lever and the amount of leverage little 167 lb. me put on it bent one post and popped another out of the ground. I tried guywires running to dog stakes; they popped right out and narrowly missed my head. So, after a few failures, I overengineered the thing. Now I have 6x6s in compacted crusher run more than two feet deep. The crossbar is a 4x4. The chair hangs from a steel cable running parallel to the 4x4 - the wood is strictly a spreader bar. It ended up being quite a structure, but it's super-stable, looks pretty nice, and it has low voltage lighting on the 4x4 so I can sit in the chair at night and read. It doubles as a hammock stand.
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    .. truly to enjoy bodily warmth, some small part of you must be cold, for there is no quality in this world that is not what it is merely by contrast. Nothing exists in itself. If you flatter yourself that you are all over comfortable, and have been so a long time, then you cannot be said to be comfortable any more. - Herman Melville

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