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  1. #101

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by ComfyCocoon View Post
    One thing that I found to significantly help me stay warm in colder weather was switching from a polyester base layer to using Wiggy's Fishnet Long Underwear. I was very skeptical of them before I tried them, but I have to say that they work great for me. They have really increased my comfort in sub freezing temps no matter what I am doing (hiking, hunting, sleeping in the hammock, shoveling snow, etc.). YMMV, but I would say don't knock them until you try them.
    If you have access-
    BPL did a decent review and look at these products.
    https://backpackinglight.com/fishnet_base_layers/

  2. #102
    Senior Member snwcmpr's Avatar
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    From:
    https://www.wiggys.com/clothing-oute...ong-underwear/

    As to the origin of fishnet or string garments (underwear), there are stories that fisherman would cover themselves with their nets, and also make garments from the nets.we do know that as early as the time around the First World War a Norwegian Army officer encouraged his men to wear string vests for marching and skiing. These were sleeveless undershirts, crocheted from a string like yarn. From these garments we developed the modern fishnet garments.
    I collect vintage camp stoves.
    I roast coffee at home.

  3. #103
    New Member
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    May 2018
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    Norfolk
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    Chameleon
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    I'd have to agree with the idea you have better heat transfer with less layers getting in the hammock. I get in with as little layers as possible and add as I need. I've woke up sweaty and needed to relieve myself. I was sweat laden in 30 degree weather, and I could never get the warmth back. So therefore I add as I go.

  4. #104
    Member
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    Oct 2017
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    Manhattan, KS
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    DIY 8.4 oz 11' Robic XL hammock
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    I agree that I get better warmth when I take some articles of clothing off. In particular, I notice this when I take off jackets or pants designed to keep wind away from my body. I do wonder though, how good was the advice I got a while back to buy a sleep system that meets “the average low” I’d be sleeping at. The thought process was to throw on extra layers of you’re cold. This is exactly opposite from these recommendations. I wonder where the line is drawn.

  5. #105
    TxAggie's Avatar
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    Jun 2016
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    Pasadena, MD
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    Half-wit (3 season), Chameleon (win
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    I think something that may be getting lost is that if you layer up, youíre adding insulation and weight. To be a better comparison, you should compare the weight of additional sleep layers vs the temperature rating of adding an equal amount of weight to your sleep system, then youíre truly comparing apples to apples.

    My guess is once you take that approach, adding the weight to your sleep system will come out as a clear winner.

    The caveat to this is now you donít have those layers for when you arenít sleeping.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #106
    New Member wolfe's Avatar
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    Jun 2018
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    regent whangarei New Zealand
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    Diy 11 ft and DD hammock
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    I love my polyester light is good. I use to sleep on a sheep skin rug in the bottom of the hammock until it gave up and died as it was to expensive to replace with another one I tried polyester and have not looked back. Amen to polyester

  7. #107
    Member
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    May 2018
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    Wichita, Ks
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    While I may be new to hammock camping, I've cold weather camped for 50 years, sleep sans clothes, and never, ever without a space blanket in the event of bitter, killing cold.

  8. #108
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Braden View Post
    While I may be new to hammock camping, I've cold weather camped for 50 years, sleep sans clothes, and never, ever without a space blanket in the event of bitter, killing cold.
    You sleep with a space blanket? Condensation is killer in bitter cold.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

  9. #109
    Member
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    I'll second the taking off layers that are designed to keep wind off your body. I wore a rain jacket to bed recently because I was too tired to take it off and then woke up a bit cold, took it off and warmed right up. Back to the original poster's comments, I have no idea why this works, it just does! Happy hanging!

  10. #110
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    You sleep with a space blanket? Condensation is killer in bitter cold.
    Condensation out in your insulation layers is certainly something to avoid, as you will soon have damp insulation layers. In fact, this is my new theory/explanation for why more than a few folks report more warmth with fewer or no layers. If starting with a warm enough quilt to start with, adding layers should slow down the loss of body heat(that would seem to be what we are trying to accomplish). But less body heat escaping into the down insulation will mean colder down of course. And that in itself should not be a problem if that heat has not left your body- having been trapped by layers.

    But, colder down means a dew point that has likely moved from ideally outside the quilt's shell to inside, somewhere in the down. Thus damper insulation. Thus feeling warmer with fewer layers, at least as long a the quilt is warm enough to start with. I'd be interested to see how many folks who are sleeping sans clothing at 10F in a 20F quilt, and find themselves cold, who then add layers, get colder. Or at least are not helped by adding a warm jacket if they are already cold in their quilt.

    But re: the space blanket, it is my opinion that the #1 reason for the failure to be warm at rated temps in a HHSS is the failure to use the space blanket as directed. Since condensation occurs when warm vapor contacts a colder temp which is below the dew point, a space blanket - just like VB clothing- with some insulation layers over it(or under it with UQs or HHSS) should never be cold enough for condensation to occur. As indeed it never has for me and a few others when use in the HHSS on top of the HH pad and whatever added insulation is under the pad. My worst case scenario over the years is a few drops found at the low point of the space blanket, though I was dry, and all of the insulation was dry. However, if I did ever manage to get noticeable condensation- or more likely outright sweat from over heating- that moisture could not get into the under insulation.

    I would also be interested to see how many folks(though the #s would be very low as so few use VBs) were sleeping in VB clothing very close to the skin(very thin LJ layer only next to skin, then VB, then all other insulation), who then added a layer, and did not get warmer, maybe even overheat? And, if adding another layer, did not get even hotter? Since any dew point condensing in the down layers would be a non issue, since the VB would eliminate any body vapor becoming available to condense in the down, I suspect layers would then all work just as layering is traditionally supposed to do. Just like when we are cold with a thin fleece jacket on while walking, we add a thick enough layer or two, then we are likely OK. Layering. I don't think I have eve heard anyone say "I was standing around camp with LJs and a jacket on, and I was cold. So I remover the jacket, and I warmed right up". But someone might have had such an experience, you never know.




    Quote Originally Posted by Codea1991 View Post
    I'll second the taking off layers that are designed to keep wind off your body. I wore a rain jacket to bed recently because I was too tired to take it off and then woke up a bit cold, took it off and warmed right up. Back to the original poster's comments, I have no idea why this works, it just does! Happy hanging!
    I'm not at all doubting that was your experience, but I am very surprised to hear that. Unless maybe there were some insulating layers UNDER the rain jacket? Otherwise that is exactly the opposite of my(and not a few others) experience sleeping in a VB, which your rain jacket should have been( i.e. a VB ). Since VB clothing stops evaporative cooling 100% and prevents any body vapor from condensing out in your insulation, and giving you ever damper insulation every night, I have found them to be an extremely efficient means of boosting warmth, considering the bulk and weight. So your experience with that has been the opposite of mine. Unless your rain jacket was pretty breathable, so called water proof/breathable aka Goretex and clones? Then theoretically it would allow a lot of your body vapor to pass on through to the insulation. More than a few folks claim then even supposedly breathable rain gear makes a good VB, though in theory it should not. At least it should not if it actually is very breathable.

    But I admit I have used breathable rain pants as my VB since I have no VB pants. I can't say for sure how helpful it was, compared to the true VBs on my torso and feet, but all was bone dry the next morning at 6F, even though I was inside a sock, i.e. a Hennessy Super Shelter including over cover with about a 6" vent hole.(plus I used a frost bib close to my face) Many people report being soaked inside a sock during cold temps.

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