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  1. #11
    Senior Member JoshD's Avatar
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    Super light hammock lifespan ?

    I did have a ridge line , is it harder to find the perfect trees with a shorter hammock? Wa no itís harder to find for 11 Ftís
    I get a good flat or side sleep in the smaller hammocks , most of the Hennessyís are 9 ftís . This idea that you need 11 to be comfortable is always pushed . The rip began midway along the sewn edge channel

    .


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    Last edited by JoshD; 06-06-2018 at 20:47.

  2. #12
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Jul 2011
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    Jersey Shore, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshD View Post
    I did have a ridge line , is it harder to find the perfect trees with a shorter hammock?
    I don't think the hammock is the limiting factor on trees - it's your tarp. The DD Superlight is only 8.8 feet long, so theoretically, you could use a 9 or 10 ft. tarp.

    As for 11 ft. hammocks, I'm a big fan. I'm 5'11" and I just find 11 ft. hammocks are infinitely more comfortable than shorter hammocks.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

  3. #13
    cmoulder's Avatar
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    Nov 2017
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    As I write this I am hanging in a dream hammock Darien made with 1.7 robic. It is part of my ultralight kit for a quick overnighter, with a base weight of less than 8 pounds. I know it sounds counterintuitive, and anathema to the UL mindset, but UL base weights are fairly easily achieved without using gossamer materials for a Superlight hammock. There are plenty of other areas where weight can be reduced.

    Pack Base weight 7.6 lbs, total pack weight 9.6 lbs, skin-out weight 13.3 lbs
    Pack_dump.jpg
    Last edited by cmoulder; 06-07-2018 at 11:22.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  4. #14
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2012
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    Tucson, Arizona
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    DIY gathered end
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    DIY ray way kit
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    Well now. Superlight hammocks seemed like a great idea to me -- for a while. My first one lasted about 5 days, then blew out on the last day of a Sierra backpack. The second one lasted just minutes, dropping me onto a cement slab during testing. The second fall cured me of the disease. I want no more of that.

    There is a lot to be said for reliability -- and safety! But the final answer is: "it depends".

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    There are plenty of other areas where weight can be reduced.

    Pack_dump.jpg
    Exactly !

  6. #16
    Senior Member kitsapcowboy's Avatar
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    Jun 2016
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    I think if I were designing a truly ultralight gathered-end hammock and wanted to maximize its longevity, I think I'd bite the bullet on a few extra grams and whip the ends instead of using a sewn channel. When I have made very light gathered-end hammocks made from 1.0 oz materials using sewn channels, my channels are always double-layer even when the hammock body is single-layer, which only adds about 6 grams to the build but gives the hammock double the material at the channels and provides the stitch rows with much more to "bite into", apparently allowing the fabric to resist stitch elongation over time. I would favor a commercial ultralight hammock that used either of these two construction methods instead of the absolute skimpiest construction.
    Smart graphic design for all your needs by BGD

  7. #17
    Senior Member JoshD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tucson Tom View Post
    Well now. Superlight hammocks seemed like a great idea to me -- for a while. My first one lasted about 5 days, then blew out on the last day of a Sierra backpack. The second one lasted just minutes, dropping me onto a cement slab during testing. The second fall cured me of the disease. I want no more of that.

    There is a lot to be said for reliability -- and safety! But the final answer is: "it depends".
    What types of hammock failed so miserably Tom


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  8. #18
    Senior Member JoshD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitsapcowboy View Post
    I think if I were designing a truly ultralight gathered-end hammock and wanted to maximize its longevity, I think I'd bite the bullet on a few extra grams and whip the ends instead of using a sewn channel. When I have made very light gathered-end hammocks made from 1.0 oz materials using sewn channels, my channels are always double-layer even when the hammock body is single-layer, which only adds about 6 grams to the build but gives the hammock double the material at the channels and provides the stitch rows with much more to "bite into", apparently allowing the fabric to resist stitch elongation over time. I would favor a commercial ultralight hammock that used either of these two construction methods instead of the absolute skimpiest construction.
    The channels on my DD held up ok it was a failure mid hammock


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  9. #19
    New Member Mshanger's Avatar
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    I been using a 1.0 robic hammock for a few years now I weigh 200lbs and have used it ALOT. It has never failed me. It even has a small hole in it my son put there and I just put some tape on either side and still been using it. I have several other hammocks but nothing is as comfortable as that robic material.

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