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  1. #11
    OneClick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    You must be able to get a nice long gentle sway going. That's one of the things I like about high suspension points.
    It's great! Just the tiniest bit is generated by getting in. Just enough to where I'm not sure if I'm even moving when I close my eyes. Knocks me right out!

  2. #12
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Wouldn't there be a serious sag issue with that arrangement? Seems the sturdy ridge pole is necessary.
    One of the nice things about this arrangement is how easy and how precise you can dial in the hanging height depending on what hammock you want to use. All that is needed is either changing the hanging loop length (I'm using a water knot) or by wrapping the hanging loop additional times around the ridge pole.

  3. #13

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    So basically... (wading into the physics waters without a life vest here, sorry if I make crucial errors) you're alleviating some of the pulling force you'd get hanging from two points fixed right into the wall (or ceiling), by separating the horizontal pulling force from the vertical, and focusing it onto the ends of the suspended pole? Assuming you're using some kind of high-friction knot/holes in the pole ends/screws/some other attachment point to keep your hammock suspension lines from just sliding toward the center of the pole?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by KBr00ks View Post
    Assuming you're using some kind of high-friction knot/holes in the pole ends/screws/some other attachment point to keep your hammock suspension lines from just sliding toward the center of the pole?
    There's different ways to skin that cat. One way that the Tato stand ridgepole solves the issue is to use an end cap that has a looped cord and biner integrated so that the user has a solid, no-slip, no muss way to attach the hammock suspension.

    Here's pic of the biner (if you look between the struts of the tripod):

    The game is the best teacher.

  5. #15

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    That makes sense. I never took a close look at a Tato stand -- looks like the same deal, where the tripods are simply suspending the weight vertically, and the ridge pole is taking the horizontal forces. I assumed the ridge pole was connected more solidly to the tops of the tripods (which would perhaps be a more precarious setup).

  6. #16
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlusOne View Post
    Hmmm. Using a couple pulleys to raise and lower the ridgepole to the ceiling (like a kayak sling system), and using snakeskins to wrap the hammock to the ridgepole, you could have a complete hideaway sleep system that tucks up against the ceiling when you aren't using it!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    You must be able to get a nice long gentle sway going. That's one of the things I like about high suspension points.
    Since it was raining a bunch today I thought I would take the system inside and set up something on the red iron trusses. I thought I would go the pulley route since it would be cool to hoist the ridge pole and hammock completely out of the way. Plus using this system would eliminate the two turtle dog tripods and get them out of the way. My first attempt with two pulleys and two snatch blocks really didn't work out to well. I worked fine if the hammock was placed in the exact right location and I was careful with hammock balance when entering and laying in the hammock. If not the ridge pole would shift downward at the heavier end. Since this was more fiddle than I wanted I went to a climbing pulley on each end. And voile' it is not the hang of choice. I didn't have enough spectra sling cord and had to make extra long loops of the mule tape, but I will rectify that when I come across some suitable cord.

    And yes, there definitely is additional swing with the long suspension, especially since my attachment points are about 12' above floor level.

    I tried to up load a couple of pictures, but the system failed with errors on multiple tries and by trying the Advanced Reply option. I will try again another day. I hope this isn't a "Great New System Feature" with the upgraded servers.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlTrailDog View Post
    … I thought I would go the pulley route since it would be cool to hoist the ridge pole and hammock completely out of the way. .... My first attempt with two pulleys and two snatch blocks really didn't work out to well. I worked fine if the hammock was placed in the exact right location and I was careful with hammock balance when entering and laying in the hammock. If not the ridge pole would shift downward at the heavier end. Since this was more fiddle than I wanted I went to a climbing pulley on each end. And voile' it is not the hang of choice. I didn't have enough spectra sling cord and had to make extra long loops of the mule tape, but I will rectify that when I come across some suitable cord.

    ...
    In that other thread, I think my last suggestion was best: for an indoor setup, hang the ridge pole with static rope. It certainly doesn't have to be spectra or dyneema, just something that is strong and doesn't stretch much. Rig a couple of pulleys at the ceiling or, in your case, trusses and run light cordage to hoist the whole rig when not being used. This part of the setup only bears a light load.

    You mention snatch blocks. Coming from sailing, a snatch block to me is one you can slide the line in from the side without threading between the block body and sheave. So I'm wondering if that what you used(?) Originally I had proposed two songle blocks and two blocks with beckets but I was thinking about the need to hold up the occupant.

    You noted that things slid around. How were you securing the lines to the ridge pole?

  8. #18
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBr00ks View Post
    So basically... (wading into the physics waters without a life vest here, sorry if I make crucial errors) you're alleviating some of the pulling force you'd get hanging from two points fixed right into the wall (or ceiling), by separating the horizontal pulling force from the vertical, and focusing it onto the ends of the suspended pole? Assuming you're using some kind of high-friction knot/holes in the pole ends/screws/some other attachment point to keep your hammock suspension lines from just sliding toward the center of the pole?
    there are two things that keep the hammock suspension from sliding toward the center of the pole (there could be a host of others like the tato pole or what ever your imagination can conjure up). The aluminum poles have a ridge on one and and I stick a piece of plastic pipe in the other end to simulate the ridge on the other end. Then I use one of my favorite knots, the clove hitch to start with. Then I usually throw several more half hitch over that just to amplify the friction.

    Quote Originally Posted by TominMN View Post
    In that other thread, I think my last suggestion was best: for an indoor setup, hang the ridge pole with static rope. It certainly doesn't have to be spectra or dyneema, just something that is strong and doesn't stretch much. Rig a couple of pulleys at the ceiling or, in your case, trusses and run light cordage to hoist the whole rig when not being used. This part of the setup only bears a light load.

    You mention snatch blocks. Coming from sailing, a snatch block to me is one you can slide the line in from the side without threading between the block body and sheave. So I'm wondering if that what you used(?) Originally I had proposed two songle blocks and two blocks with beckets but I was thinking about the need to hold up the occupant.

    You noted that things slid around. How were you securing the lines to the ridge pole?
    My original set up used bona fide snatch blocks from my truck winch system, i.e. they separate so you don't have to thread the end through like a pulley. Way over kill, but it was what I had on hand. When that didn't quite work how I wanted due to the "balancing" issue I went to two aluminum climbing "snatch blocks" that separate so you can install mid-line.

    The lines that come down from the beam are secured to the ridge pole with a clove hitch, easily adjustable to height. If it looks or feels a bit hinky I throw another half hitch over the end of the pole.

    HammockIronHang11032018_1.jpgHammockIronHang11032018_2.jpg

    I also experimented with setting up the Hammocktent 90* because it normally needs a higher hang height. It worked fine, but there is some noticeable flex in the aluminum ridge pole. Shouldn't be a problem since the HT has a weight limit of 250lbs anyway. But the best solution is to remove one section of pole and use a 12 ft. ridge pole vs the 16 ft. ridge pole for GE or Bridges.

    HTHammockIronHang11032018_1.jpgHTHammockIronHang11032018_3.jpg

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