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  1. #1
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    No Net Set Up Question

    Forgive my newb-ness. Discovered hammocks recently, bought a second hand No Net that was modified, and then bought a new one. The first one I bought replaced the stock suspension with a paracord attached to a couple of triangle cinch buckles and then 1" nylon webbing (rachet strap). While this makes set up super easy (I'm not great at tying knots) I could never get really comfortable as the ends gathered up real tight and the hammock always had a center line that was significantly more taught than the outer edges (my feet always flop to one side or the other... not comfy). The second NN I modified myself, using 550# paracord, two ring buckles (1 1/8) and rachet strap 1" nylon webbing, I still have a very taught center ridge and can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. I've tried more sag, less sag nothing seems to flatten out the hammock so it's more comfortable.... thoughts? Suggestions? I like the ease of set up with the nylon straps but I'd rather sleep on the ground than have the center ridge I'm dealing with now.... help!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
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    Try JustJeff's Site http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCamping.htm He's a member here and I found his sight very helpful starting out. good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The next time your feet flop to the side take the hint and move your head to the opposite side. It's called a diagonal lie and it is the proper way to sleep in most any hammock no-net or not. There are a few narrow hammocks which are desgned for a more in-line lie but the vast majority like lots of sag and a diagonal lie.
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  4. #4
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    Wider hammocks are MUCH more comfortable. If your hammock (? you don't mention a brand name) is narrow, i.e., under 50 inches wide, they inherently are harder to get comfortable in, in my experience.
    The same holds true with the length of the hammock.
    Try to to find some fabric in the 60 inch wide range, and get a length of it 10 feet long minimum and build your own. Most fabric has a salvage edge which doesnt require sewing. Simply tie a knot into each end and tie on some cord or webbing, and give it a test hang. You can find suitable fabric for a hammock for $1.50 a yard and up. So, for a 15 dollar investment, you can solve a lot of your problems.
    If you like the lay of your new hammock, you can then untie the knots and learn to sew, and give it a more professional apprearance.
    Sag plays a roll in the comfort of a hammock, but not as much as width and length, IMO.
    Good luck and welcome to the forum.

    EDIT: I see you posted in the Claytor section, so I'm assuming you have a Claytor.
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  5. #5
    New Member Hokie's Avatar
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    The other thing you may want to check out on Jeff's site if your hammock does not have it, is a ridgeline. I went several years before I really understood how important that was to the comfort and many new hammocks do not have this already included.

  6. #6
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bob View Post
    ......... While this makes set up super easy (I'm not great at tying knots) I could never get really comfortable as the ends gathered up real tight and the hammock always had a center line that was significantly more taught than the outer edges (my feet always flop to one side or the other... not comfy). The second NN I modified myself, using 550# paracord, two ring buckles (1 1/8) and rachet strap 1" nylon webbing, I still have a very taught center ridge and can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. I've tried more sag, less sag nothing seems to flatten out the hammock so it's more comfortable.... thoughts? Suggestions? I like the ease of set up with the nylon straps but I'd rather sleep on the ground than have the center ridge I'm dealing with now.... help!
    First question, do you have a Claytor No Net?

    You are unlikely to completely get rid of that center ridge, it is inherent- to a greater or lesser degree, in every gathered end hammock I have tried. Surprisingly, the hammock I seem to have the least problem with this ( on the diagonal lie anyway) is the Hennessy (HH) Safari and good old Speer. Also the Claytor No Net, which is near or at the top in this regard . But it's ALWAYS there at least a little, for me, with ALL of them. If you can not tolerate a center ridge, there is only one 100% cure for this that I know of. A bridge hammock, such as the JRB BMBH or a home made one.

    Second, what is the exact problem the ridge is causing you? Are you sleeping midline(straight head to foot)? The Claytor is one of the few that I can do this in, and do so comfortably. My feet fall to the side of the center ridge. This sounds like what you might be describing. But, for me, this is pretty darn comfy. This forms a pocket for my feet, allowing a slight bend in my knees. It does decrease room in the shoulders, but not enough to be a problem. But if this is what you are describing, then you obviously don't like it for whatever reason. All I can suggest is putting something under your knees while keeping your feet in the middle of the hammock. Maybe that will help some, and will prevent knee pain. Again, there is only one commercial hammock for laying absolutely flat on the hammock midline, without the feet falling into a pocket on the side, the JRB BMBH. The down side to this is that, if you are a really big, broad shouldered type(per your user name), you MIGHT not be happy with the room in the shoulder area or might exceed the weight limits.

    Or, are you sleeping diagonally and the center ridge is causing discomfort on your lower leg/calf? If so, again, there is no getting rid of that ridge. It is at a minimum ( for me anyway) with the Speer and Claytor No net. The HH Safari is wide enough and long enough that I am always able to find a spot where I can avoid pressure on my leg, so it is probably best for this problem, besides, of course the BMBH, which has no ridge to avoid or minimize. If this is your complaint, I suggest you put a stuff sack under your knees, with or with out a pad under your legs. This is the only solution I have found with most gathered end hammocks, and it pretty much works for me. Of course, you must have something left over to put in a stuff sack.

    If you have the Claytor, you might want to experiment with the original suspension and fairly wide trees. It is a super easy suspension to use, almost as easy as a cinch buckle. And with the webbing coming back to each side of the hammock webbing channel from non-skinny trees, the hammock ends are allowed to be a tad wider, rather than cinched tight. This may make a little comfort difference and center ridge difference, or not. This is, after all, how this hammock is designed. But you will have to do something to prevent water wicking in, like a knot or two at each side of the end webbing channel.

    Hope this helps. Good luck!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    First question, do you have a Claytor No Net?

    You are unlikely to completely get rid of that center ridge, it is inherent- to a greater or lesser degree, in every gathered end hammock I have tried. Surprisingly, the hammock I seem to have the least problem with this ( on the diagonal lie anyway) is the Hennessy (HH) Safari and good old Speer. Also the Claytor No Net, which is near or at the top in this regard . But it's ALWAYS there at least a little, for me, with ALL of them. If you can not tolerate a center ridge, there is only one 100% cure for this that I know of. A bridge hammock, such as the JRB BMBH or a home made one.

    Second, what is the exact problem the ridge is causing you? Are you sleeping midline(straight head to foot)? The Claytor is one of the few that I can do this in, and do so comfortably. My feet fall to the side of the center ridge. This sounds like what you might be describing. But, for me, this is pretty darn comfy. This forms a pocket for my feet, allowing a slight bend in my knees. It does decrease room in the shoulders, but not enough to be a problem. But if this is what you are describing, then you obviously don't like it for whatever reason. All I can suggest is putting something under your knees while keeping your feet in the middle of the hammock. Maybe that will help some, and will prevent knee pain. Again, there is only one commercial hammock for laying absolutely flat on the hammock midline, without the feet falling into a pocket on the side, the JRB BMBH. The down side to this is that, if you are a really big, broad shouldered type(per your user name), you MIGHT not be happy with the room in the shoulder area or might exceed the weight limits.

    If you have the Claytor, you might want to experiment with the original suspension and fairly wide trees. It is a super easy suspension to use, almost as easy as a cinch buckle. And with the webbing coming back to each side of the hammock webbing channel from non-skinny trees, the hammock ends are allowed to be a tad wider, rather than cinched tight. This may make a little comfort difference and center ridge difference, or not. This is, after all, how this hammock is designed. But you will have to do something to prevent water wicking in, like a knot or two at each side of the end webbing channel.

    Hope this helps. Good luck!
    BillyBob,

    Indeed, the Hammock is a Claytor No Net. I'm beginning to wonder if altering the stock suspension has caused unnecessary gathering @ the end thus creating more of a center ridge than is necessary... dunno, this is my first go @ hanging.

    I didn't realize that I could/should try to lie diagonally to the hammock.... if this helps I'll give it a try. While I'm quite comfortable in the back yard just hanging out, when I try to sleep it feels like my knees are hyper extending if laying @ a diagonal will mitigate this I'll be very happy.

    I'm also wondering if the distance between posts is too close? There's only ~11' between posts which means there's only 4-5" we webbing before reaching the buckles.

    Thanks to you and everyone who's chimed in with helpful suggestions

  8. #8
    Senior Member stevebo's Avatar
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    I bought a claytor no net a few months ago. I hated the stock suspension, so I replaced it with speer straps, using dutch clips and triglides. Ive heard several people mention that when you get rid of the stock suspension and replace it with cord, the hammock bunches up alot in the middle. Using the speer straps, It seems to have even more room in the center to me---very comfortable! Also, if you use a ccf pad in between the layers, it flattens the center out a bit. I would go with straps---I think you will find a huge difference in how the hammock lays! I really like the no net--------you can lay diagonally if you want, but you also have the option to lay in the middle channel-----good luck and let me know how it goes for you!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bob View Post
    BillyBob,

    Indeed, the Hammock is a Claytor No Net. I'm beginning to wonder if altering the stock suspension has caused unnecessary gathering @ the end thus creating more of a center ridge than is necessary... dunno, this is my first go @ hanging.

    I didn't realize that I could/should try to lie diagonally to the hammock.... if this helps I'll give it a try. While I'm quite comfortable in the back yard just hanging out, when I try to sleep it feels like my knees are hyper extending if laying @ a diagonal will mitigate this I'll be very happy.

    I'm also wondering if the distance between posts is too close? There's only ~11' between posts which means there's only 4-5" we webbing before reaching the buckles.

    Thanks to you and everyone who's chimed in with helpful suggestions
    I think it is easy to get a Claytor too tight. I have a Claytor JH and I like at least 15' between trees and a fair amount of sag. I am wide shouldered, 6'2", 240 lbs. and I get very comfortable in mine even on my side. My ends are gathered as I have whoopie slings through the channels, so they are drawn up pretty tight. Try a little more sag. at 11' spacing and 4-5 inches lee way, sounds like it might be really tight.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bob View Post
    BillyBob,

    Indeed, the Hammock is a Claytor No Net. I'm beginning to wonder if altering the stock suspension has caused unnecessary gathering @ the end thus creating more of a center ridge than is necessary... dunno, this is my first go @ hanging.

    I didn't realize that I could/should try to lie diagonally to the hammock.... if this helps I'll give it a try. While I'm quite comfortable in the back yard just hanging out, when I try to sleep it feels like my knees are hyper extending if laying @ a diagonal will mitigate this I'll be very happy.

    I'm also wondering if the distance between posts is too close? There's only ~11' between posts which means there's only 4-5" we webbing before reaching the buckles.

    Thanks to you and everyone who's chimed in with helpful suggestions
    FB, may I ask: when laying mid-line, you do put your feet out to the side, with each heel just barely inside the hammock fabric, right? I just want to make sure I have that right, it seems to be what you were describing in your first post. I'm asking because, when I do that with the Claytor or HH Safari, maybe even the Speer, it's really quite comfortable for me. There is certainly no "knees are hyper extending", not at all. My feet settle down into some sort of pocket that forms,and this actually puts a comfortable bend in my knees. With no need for something separate under my knees, like I almost always need in most hammocks when laying diagonal. I need something under my knees on the diagonal first to negate hyperextension in some hammocks, but even more important for me to prevent center ridge pressure on my calf...... very unpleasant.

    But you are already putting each foot to the corresponding side, but finding this uncomfortable, is that right? I can't figure out why. There should be no knee hyper-extension unless your feet are in the middle. For me, even just half way out to the sides gets rid of all hyperextension, at least with this hammock(Claytor).

    EDIT: I think that 11 foot span might indeed cause some problems. The No Net is 10 feet long, and that really doesn't leave much room for the suspension, unless you have a lot of sag. Of course, lots of folks like lots of sag. And sag is fine with a CNN, but seems to me not near as much is needed.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 03-11-2010 at 15:24.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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