Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 69 of 69
  1. #61
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Dutch chameleon.
    Tarp
    Cubin fiber
    Insulation
    HG UQ TQ OV pod
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    As long as you're not using a zip-in bug net or top cover it really isn't critical. If you are using a bug net or top cover, especially asym, a SRL that's too long can stress the zippers on the ends, and if it's way too short it could stress the zippers on the sides at the widest points (less likely, but possible). A bit too short isn't going to hurt anything.

    That said, with my DH Dariens I'm not experimenting with anything because they are designed with very close tolerances and I'm not going to trifle with Smurf Magic.
    Haha if Smurf magic is comfy than theres no reason to. Enjoy it and ask no questions. Tell no one. Its magic 😆

    Yeah there is no stress. I basically just ok the hammock up and realized the RL was drooping a bit and it annoyed me so I tightened it up just enough so that it was tight. Turned out to bw mighty comfy so I'm rolling with it. Of course, I am coming from a hammock that didnt even come with a RL. So we will see.

  2. #62
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Double
    Posts
    2

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Simple answer for spending money period: What is your problem?
    ....
    It's possible that this post is the greatest thing ever posted on the internet. It should be a pop-up on every online retailer.

  3. #63
    WalksIn2Trees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Hammock
    Dutch Chameleon
    Tarp
    WL Old Man Winter
    Insulation
    0į Zepp/Ren...UGQ
    Suspension
    straps w/ RL
    Posts
    723
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by CheapTentGuy View Post
    It's possible that this post is the greatest thing ever posted on the internet. It should be a pop-up on every online retailer.
    technically that's the formula for every successful ad ever, even if you have to invent a problem.

    George Carlin had a bit about this
    "diapers" became:Ľ Diapers for Boys!; Diapers for Girls! :Became:Ľ Diapers for BOYS & GIRLS!!



    Sent from my SM-T827V using Tapatalk

  4. #64
    Senior Member TreeBeard13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    "The Shire" SC PA
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    DIY
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear
    Suspension
    DIY Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    154
    I'm a DIY guy at heart. I have used my DIY hammock, tarp, fronky bug net for many years. I'm building a stand this weekend. I bought 7/64 Amsteel and made my own whoopie slings, loops and soft shackles. To me DIY is a HUGE part of the hobby!
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    I always like going South; somehow, it feels like going downhill.

    ...and as it harm none, do what ye will.

  5. #65
    TxAggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Hammock
    Half-wit (3 season), Chameleon (win
    Tarp
    Superfly, Thunderf
    Insulation
    EE Revelation 20*,
    Suspension
    Whoopie!
    Posts
    1,365

    Why buy an expensive hammock?

    Iíve been mulling over the initial question: Why buy an Expensive Hammock?

    Iíve been trying to think of justifications, excuses, evasions, yada yada.

    But the short and honest answer is: because I can.

    I work hard professionally and personally. Iím in sales myself and I expect my customers to take value in the products I sell, some of which are and have been quite expensive. Iíve rarely sold the economical option. So why would I personally cut corners on expense when I fully expect my customers to pay top dollar for my own products? I DIY every now and then and I enjoy it, but when it comes to the bigger items, I let the experts do what experts do, and Iím happy to pay that premium.

    Otherwise, Iím pretty much a hypocrite.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #66

    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Hammock
    12x6' diy
    Tarp
    diy 1.1 silpoly 12
    Insulation
    cosco , big agnes
    Suspension
    whoopie!!!
    Posts
    447
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Simple answer for spending money period: What is your problem?
    If you don't have a problem, then no amount of money you spend will solve it.
    If you have a problem... some problems cost more to fix than others.

    Why buy a hammock at all? A $20 foam pad works for some... if you live in the piney woods you could scrape up some pine needles for free each night.
    Course I own several expensive sleeping pads because I don't find those to be a good solution... but when I was younger and broke both solutions worked fine too.
    Now I find the hammock more pleasant... and those expensive pads don't do the job.... my problems changed, so did my solutions and my budget.

    Some of the expense is related to those 'multiple reasons of which I won't detail here' when it comes to buying cottage in general.

    More specifically- at the core of a gathered end is the fabric. That takes money to source, and even times develop for hammocks. Takes some time to talk with you and sort out what fabric is right for you. Those things cost some money for the vendor, and thus for you the customer. If you happen to be super comfy on plain jane ripstop or whatever fabric your el cheapo of choice is made from... then good for you. If not, you're paying for some expertise and upgraded material to give you something better for you that does in my opinion have tangible value.

    As a bit of gathered end skeptic in general... I think that the highest tangible value that justifies cottage hammocks is the simple ability to properly select material appropriate to your height, weight and needs.
    So the simplest reason not to buy a $30 cheapie vs a $60 netless is the quality(and quantity) of the most important component. With rare exception; a gathered end is just a big hunk of fabric. If you buy a big hunk of fabric that doesn't work for you... then any amount of money you spent is wasted. In this case that $30 extra you may spend is typically saving you from tossing the first $30 in the trash and very good value.

    If you value things like color, customization, quilt hooks, tie-outs, or other little details... only you can evaluate what dollar amount those add.
    I don't use tie outs... some won't hang without them. Some would only buy a hammock in Crimson Red with blue stitches... some folks figure they are all the same color with my eyes closed.
    Those are things that are really only justified for you personally and it's hard to say they have hard dollar value... though it's not hard to add up the labor costs and hardware if needed when discussing them.

    After the initial value of quality fabric in a good length and width for you... provided the vendor is solid in execution... the money beyond that is really only to meet your needs.
    Dutch still sells netless hammocks for good reason. There is nothing requiring you to automatically jump to the Chameleon.

    Something like the chameleon... you're paying for flexibility.
    Do you even need a bugnet... nothing lighter than not carrying one.
    Zip it off says the next guy and it will get lighter... but you still have to pay for the zipper and carry the half on the hammock that remains.
    Zippers are heavy. The little bits and tie-outs add up. Every customer has to balance those things in thier own mind. They are not good or bad... just items on your personal pros vs cons list.

    If you love having one hammock that can do it all, with the option to double it up, put on a net, flip on a cover, zip in some storage or spice up the old hammock with a printed net or cover down the line... then each of those things add value for you and justify the cost. Designing and coordinating all that stuff has prototype costs, development, and lots of switching gears for production. Those things are real costs built into each unit sold.

    If you could give a crap about any of that... no need to pay for it.

    It's like anything else... the more you want... the more it costs.
    If you're willing to buy a table cloth blank and tie a knot in it... it cost $12.
    If nothing works for you and you need one of my high end bridges... they cost $400.

    Some see my bridges and say I have to have one because I have a problem.
    Some are curious, find out how much it costs and realize they don't have a problem.
    Many of them joke... My (driver, fishing rod, gun, knife, or whatever) cost me $1000 so a $400 hammock isn't the end of the world.

    Some kid living in his mom's basement rolling stuff off a Chinese line at 500 units a pop with kickstarter funds can offer you something cheaper... and there will always be a market for it.
    There are a several apples and oranges things you can argue... but if you get in it and it works for you... do you care? Unless you are willing to consider those reasons you want to buy from a cottage vendor then you're never going to be able to crunch enough numbers to justify the costs of that choice by directly comparing specs. Ask a camping stove vendor to justify their $40 stove they paid to develop when the factory they hired will sell it direct for $10... and you get the idea. In that case it is literally apples to apples... you're just cutting out all the development, testing, and marketing overhead it took to develop the stove in the first place.

    Overall... for specialty gear for a specialty hobby... I find that cottage hammock vendors generally undercharge or are at worst fairly priced.
    A good sleeping pad or mummy bag is $200. A quality backpack $200. A good tent at least that. Go to something specialized, even off the shelf/mass produced and it will double or triple.

    It's all relative... I think the only problem facing hammock vendors is the dearth of cheapie knock-offs flooding the market as well as the rise of internet savvy kids with great websites, an ali-baba contact, and great social media who have never even seen a sewing machine in person. Hard to compete with that basically zero overhead model for a cottage guy... but again... a 20 year old kid can sleep anywhere in anything anytime. They are not going to be able to understand why you have an issue with their hammock or would want anything more. Even if they did... that pattern isn't sitting in the factory catalog to order. And that is where the cottage guy comes in and earns his money.
    and???

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    coggon, iowa
    Hammock
    dream hammock
    Tarp
    waterproof
    Insulation
    underquilt
    Suspension
    straps
    Posts
    45
    ok i have to chime in here a bit, just because, i work in prototype and are the go between from the engineers and the shop floor employees and i have this saying i use all the time there is computer world and real world. basically computer world is like all the hang calculations, a great place to start off at but real world experience is the best way to fine tune. works for most anything

  8. #68
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    1,404
    Images
    70
    Quote Originally Posted by peeeeetey View Post
    and???
    When JB responds, there is no 'and?' .....

    His answers are well-reasoned, thorough and fair, and they provide a little "inside baseball" perspective to help us understand why things are the way we see them.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  9. #69
    Member goalie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Hammock
    Dutch Hexon 1.6 single layer wide
    Tarp
    Kelty Noahs 9
    Insulation
    Cayene Pepper Wide
    Suspension
    Dutch whoopies
    Posts
    82
    Images
    2
    My "nice" hammocks are way better to sleep in than my original cheaper ones were.

    I'm 6', 185 pounds, so it's not like I need a huge hammock or anything, but I'm happier with nicer.

    I slept here in MN with a temp of 40 degrees last night. Loco Libre underquilt, Enlightened top quilt. Dutch hexon hammock. I could do it with cheaper gear. That great would be heavier, and I probably wouldn't sleep as well.



    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    "It turns out that what you have is less important than what you do with it"

  • + New Posts
  • Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

    Similar Threads

    1. Hammock Camping can get Expensive with Three People
      By m2244 in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 34
      Last Post: 07-29-2018, 13:34
    2. Hammock Fabric - does more expensive = more durable
      By tcar0341 in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: 02-14-2017, 20:19
    3. Replies: 40
      Last Post: 07-24-2016, 23:20
    4. The Expensive Hammock That Will Save You Money
      By hikenbike in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 59
      Last Post: 01-22-2016, 11:23
    5. Speer Hammock Expensive
      By Mule in forum Speer Hammocks
      Replies: 25
      Last Post: 09-10-2009, 16:05

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •