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Thread: DCF Tarp

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billcole View Post
    So is anyone using shock cord on their pullouts? I am going to put shock cord with mitten hooks on the doors and I was thinking about putting a small loop of shock cord with either dutchware fleaz, tarpworms or hook worms on the corners. I was doing some research on DCF tarps and there seems to be some that feel the shock cord provides some safety for the tarps tearing.
    The shock cord and mitten hook combo is sooo nice. I did that immediately.

    I do not use shock cord any other place. I absolutely love how the DCF has no stretch and pitches so nice and tightly. For me, shock cord would introduce the stretch that silnylon and silpoly have inherently that I'm happy to get away from. The DCF is strong and I imagine pulling out the stake before tearing, but I could be wrong and understand the concern. I'm also not one to trip over lines. I'm using Dutch's 1.75mm UHMWPE in Honey Gold with Line Lock Hooks.

  2. #72
    cmc4free's Avatar
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    Just to add 2 cents...

    This goes for any tarp, not specifically for DCF. My preferred corner tie out method, after trying many, is to use a system of:

    (Starting at the tarp corner D-ring)
    - loop of shock cord
    - Hookworm
    - guyline - your choice of materials
    - stake (mini Groundhogs are my fave)

    In my systems, I use spliceable cordage and capture the stake within the loop of a locked brummel eye splice. The other end of the guyline goes through the hole in the Hookworm and gets tied off with an Ashley stopper knot. The loop of shock cord gets attached to the tarp D-ring with a lark's head. Repeat for each corner. When I make a longer pair for porch mode, I tend to make them out of a different color. When setting up, I pull the shock cord just about as tight as it will go.

    I put the shock cord loops on the corners of all my tarps, so I can use the same set of stakes and guylines with whichever tarp I choose to bring. The Hookworm will be right near the corner of the tarp, which means you can easily adjust the guyline while under the tarp. Another advantage is the guylines are attached to the stakes, which makes it very difficult to lose or forget a stake when packing up - and lastly the guylines can simply be wrapped around the stakes for tangle-free storage.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4free View Post
    Just to add 2 cents...

    This goes for any tarp, not specifically for DCF. My preferred corner tie out method, after trying many, is to use a system of:

    (Starting at the tarp corner D-ring)
    - loop of shock cord
    - Hookworm
    - guyline - your choice of materials
    - stake (mini Groundhogs are my fave)

    In my systems, I use spliceable cordage and capture the stake within the loop of a locked brummel eye splice. The other end of the guyline goes through the hole in the Hookworm and gets tied off with an Ashley stopper knot. The loop of shock cord gets attached to the tarp D-ring with a lark's head. Repeat for each corner. When I make a longer pair for porch mode, I tend to make them out of a different color. When setting up, I pull the shock cord just about as tight as it will go.

    I put the shock cord loops on the corners of all my tarps, so I can use the same set of stakes and guylines with whichever tarp I choose to bring. The Hookworm will be right near the corner of the tarp, which means you can easily adjust the guyline while under the tarp. Another advantage is the guylines are attached to the stakes, which makes it very difficult to lose or forget a stake when packing up - and lastly the guylines can simply be wrapped around the stakes for tangle-free storage.
    I too have begun to keep my guylines attached to the stakes, the line lock hook makes for easy removal from the D-ring. I realized last trip that I need longer guys for porch mode and was just thinking that it would be smart for them to be a different color. Having them in my stake bag means I have options at a very minimal weight, like dogbones for hammock suspension lengthening.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billcole View Post
    So is anyone using shock cord on their pullouts? I am going to put shock cord with mitten hooks on the doors and I was thinking about putting a small loop of shock cord with either dutchware fleaz, tarpworms or hook worms on the corners. I was doing some research on DCF tarps and there seems to be some that feel the shock cord provides some safety for the tarps tearing.
    Shock cord for the doors is great. That allows you entrance and egress without unstaking a door.

    As for the corner tie-outs: One significant advantage of DCF is that it does not stretch therefore will not sag if it gets wet. It is very unlikely that your DCF tarp will tear and less likely that a catastrophic occurance that might tear your tarp would be ameliorated with a bit of shock cord. Shock cord at the tie-out will decrease the tautness with which you will be able to pitch your tarp so, it will be more likely to flap incesantly in the wind.

    On the other hand... It is your hobby. Try it and and see what you like. I have tried a dozen differnt hammocks, close to as many differnt types of tent stakes, continous ridge lines, non-continous ridgelines, Whoopies, straps, buckles, hardware, knots and hitches. Shock cord is cheap. If you decide you don't like it after trying it, you'll have invested $1.50 .

    Good Luck
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  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCDave View Post
    Shock cord for the doors is great. That allows you entrance and egress without unstaking a door.

    As for the corner tie-outs: One significant advantage of DCF is that it does not stretch therefore will not sag if it gets wet. It is very unlikely that your DCF tarp will tear and less likely that a catastrophic occurance that might tear your tarp would be ameliorated with a bit of shock cord. Shock cord at the tie-out will decrease the tautness with which you will be able to pitch your tarp so, it will be more likely to flap incesantly in the wind.
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  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Early on I used shock cords but I think there is enough flex in the system to absorb considerable shock if you trip over them. MikekiM once tripped pretty hard over a corner guyline and we both thought surely it would have ripped but there was absolutely no damage to the .51 DCF!
    To be fair, I do have a very small shock cord loop through the corner d-ring and through the Tarp worm. But it's only about a one inch loop. I bought the tarp with those on. That said, the loop 'bottoms out' with just a little pull on it and.. Yes, I tripped hard on that guyline.. I really thought I was going find the corner torn.

    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4free View Post
    Just to add 2 cents...

    This goes for any tarp, not specifically for DCF. My preferred corner tie out method, after trying many, is to use a system of:

    (Starting at the tarp corner D-ring)
    - loop of shock cord
    - Hookworm
    - guyline - your choice of materials
    - stake (mini Groundhogs are my fave)....
    I am using a similar setup as above, except I use Tarp Worms and keep the guylines on each of the tarps. And I put a fixed eye in both ends of the ZLine guylines. I use the same set of stakes regardless of the tarp and don't worry about guyline lengths since they are tarp specific. I know I could switch to Hook worms but it's a system that is pretty locked down at this point.
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