Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Valpo, IN
    Hammock
    Towns-End Luxury Bridge
    Posts
    1,310
    Quote Originally Posted by rhughesnc View Post
    Just saw the prices...****!
    Ha! Replied to your email.

    Yar- You're looking at $300-400 for most of my bridges.
    I tell nearly everyone to try a gathered end first. Technically I tell folks to just get out and sleep on the ground but not supposed to say that here, I don't care so long as you like the woods and most of us did just fine when we were young enough to sleep anywhere we happened to pass out. I slept for many a summer on 3/8" CCF foam and fancy pads before that was finally a bust. Do the most with the least you can... but don't stay home.

    If that gathered end doesn't work- and you're light enough- try a ridgerunner or BMBH. Bridges are really neat and solve many common issues folks have with Gathered Ends; especially sleep position options.
    One size fits most... but still a few left out of the comfort range of these products. In my experience from customer feedback... GENERALLY Speaking... around 200lbs, 6' tall, or shoulders wide enough for an XL shirt are the customers who may find themselves outside the range of "one size fits most". Both bridges are end bar models with slightly different features. Not all bridges equal, nor is there a best.... just the one that works for you.
    The big advantage these two have is that they are established products, from established vendors. They have underquilts ready to go, more options, and plenty of time and customer feedback out there to sort it all out so you get a solid product.

    If that doesn't work...

    The Amok recently switched to a direct to consumer model... so pricing came down. Prior to that my bridges were pretty well in line with their stuff... these days that $100 or so the retailer got goes back in your pocket.

    If shopping dollars... you need a sleeping pad with vertical baffles too so consider that in your final tally... though looks like the XL plus pad is about $300 plus shipping.

    Fer mine... technically you need a quilt or pad (but hopefully one you already own). You need a bugnet if you want one... or go without if you don't.
    Depending on what you have; you may or may not need a new tarp- though having a custom tarp ready to rock is a pretty cool thing Amok offers.

    Some folks tell me they belly sleep in the Amok. It seems plausible but that's a very tricky challenge in my opinion. Especially if you have a back issue. It is very difficult to eliminate negative pressure on the spine.
    I'd like to hear from more folks who sleep full time on their belly in an Amok... not simply roll over for a bit. That's not smack talking so to speak- just an honest request. If that feature does indeed work for a full time belly sleeper I'm happy to point it out to those who reach out to me for advice. As many who have done so will tell you- half the time I'll tell you to buy someone else's stuff over mine.

    There are plenty of good hammocks, and some decent production bridges out there.
    So what I sell in my premium bridges is something others don't.
    They don't need a pad for structure, and they are designed for backpacking based activities- even if that is a walk in hunting/fishing or lower mile backpacking trip... you still gotta hump it in.

    The Amok is really cool... but backpacking with it is debatable. So that may be a big factor one way or the other... if you're car camping or base camping you may even prefer the Amok.
    Taking advantage of the lounge/seated features are more likely with this type of use as well. You can't really pull a few straps and sit in a lazy boy with my stuff.

    There's a trick to make my bridge a better chair- but you don't really want to sit around in a bridge hammock all day. It's designed to sleep in.

    The good news... there are more options for folks to get out and enjoy the woods, especially for those who like this hammock thing but didn't quite fall in love with a standard gathered end.

    From your end-
    After all the marketing crap and BS... my bridges are more or less like a floating cot. It is a unique experience that doesn't require you to crawl in from the end or really do anything special. You just lay down and go to bed.
    There is at least 8' of usable bedspace and it has adjustable ends, a way to tune the center 'pop' of the bridge a bit... but for the most part you don't need to beat yourself over the head sorting out how to hang it. One big bridge advantage is consistency of setup. You more or less can expect the same experience night after night... even if you fudge the pitch a bit.

    I have no BS pricing- shipping is included (Conus) and paypal fees are covered. I don't do friends and family shenanigans. I don't take orders, I won't take a deposit, I won't take your money.
    You tell me you want one; If I have one in stock- you buy it and it ships. If not- I put you on a waiting list and when the next batch is done you buy it or you don't.

    From my end- getting that to happen is mildly complicated and tedious- which means these take 4-8 hours a piece to build and labor is always the most expensive part of any hammock.

    Overall- there are options- try them first and save me for last.

    Biggest ding to my stuff is the sticker shock... though it's in line with most higher end outdoor gear in my opinion... what do you care?
    Some folks will spend $1000 for a golf club, some of us are too cheap to mini-golf... money is yours not mine so only you can make that call.

    Second ding- the recessed bar design is something most accept as part of the deal but a small minority have an issue with it. Typically it takes a dozen nights to get used to... once you do it's something you don't think about.
    Having the bar there is not only what makes the bridge so comfy- it also does helps with tons of subtle stuff like stability, load transfer, comfort, support, etc. It's what makes these unique... and what makes them expensive.
    For many folks... with all the bedspace to work with available many slide down a bit and avoid the whole head bar issue completely. You can just turn that end into a gear storage bin and use it like an end bar bridge if you don't need to belly sleep.

    I have a few prototypes out to address these concerns but nothing to report at the moment. On this topic though... end bar bridges can be tough for folks over 6' period. So I find that a debatable option.

    I'm a pretty small vendor who builds these in my basement. I get overwhelmed pretty easy so I lay pretty low. So other than chiming in on the forum to help folks out I don't do much to promote myself or my stuff until I can sort out a better way to produce. Cause the worst piece of gear out there is one somebody sold you and can't ever ship you.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK
    Hammock
    Amok Draumr 3.0
    Tarp
    Amok
    Insulation
    Synmat 9 LW
    Suspension
    cinch buckles
    Posts
    1,493
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post

    Some folks tell me they belly sleep in the Amok. It seems plausible but that's a very tricky challenge in my opinion. Especially if you have a back issue. It is very difficult to eliminate negative pressure on the spine.
    I'd like to hear from more folks who sleep full time on their belly in an Amok... not simply roll over for a bit. That's not smack talking so to speak- just an honest request.
    I am a full time stomach sleeper, and it's 100% why I got a Draumr, rather than anything else

    one of the things you can do is pull in the leg straps, and it drops the footbox, so you can actually sleep slightly.....upside down banana style (i don't know how to explain it any other way)

    I generally don't do that, flat is great for me.

    I don't have a ton of back issues, but I did tear some muscles in the lower back (upper ***?) about 2 decades ago that really force me to stomach sleep

  3. #13
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sandy, UT
    Posts
    44
    2+ years, nightly, in Just Bill's Big Guy Bridge: what he said! No more straight forward person to deal with!

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Valpo, IN
    Hammock
    Towns-End Luxury Bridge
    Posts
    1,310
    Quote Originally Posted by Tikker View Post
    I am a full time stomach sleeper, and it's 100% why I got a Draumr, rather than anything else

    one of the things you can do is pull in the leg straps, and it drops the footbox, so you can actually sleep slightly.....upside down banana style (i don't know how to explain it any other way)

    I generally don't do that, flat is great for me.

    I don't have a ton of back issues, but I did tear some muscles in the lower back (upper ***?) about 2 decades ago that really force me to stomach sleep
    You're the bulk of the 'some folks' to be honest,

    Not that I mind hearing from you on it, just can't think of many others I've heard from. One of these days I'll have to get one just so I'm better informed but what you're saying makes sense.
    (Though technically wouldn't you let out or loosen the leg strap to add slack and drop the footbox?)

    The key to belly sleeping is to get the center to pick up enough so that you're; at worst flat, but ideally so that you are just slightly raised in the torso area so your legs can drop off. Depending on your preference, many like to extend their arms up as well so you need almost a foot longer than your height so you aren't pressed up against either end in any way. For those with disc issues in their back this can be a very sensitive difference. It all depends on your injury. One reason many like the gathered end so much is the slight banana curve, but for those who have a low back injury that this position aggravates then you need the other position. If you're the type who needs a towel or small pillow under your hip/pelvis when belly sleeping on a firm mattress then this is really for you.

    I perfectly understand your 'upside down banana style' comment. It's a feature of my bridges I describe as inverted or simply 'pop'. As a simple statement just due to the length between the bars- it's very hard to get an end bar bridge to pop in the center. The closer the bars, the easier to get the center to pop up. I tell folks to picture a large barrel. A gathered end feels like sleeping inside that barrel- and generally so does an end bar bridge. A bridge with good pop in the center feels like you're laying on the outside of the barrel. With an adjustable RL to control that effect you can dial it in for your needs.

    Sounds like the Amok can let you do something similar? Shug did a good job looking at it and explaining it overall, but I know he's not a belly sleeper. I could sleep darn near anywhere at one point in my life but that point has passed- so to an extent anything can work for anyone and you do need a bit of context. I don't mean to belittle anyone's experience as really we're down to some pretty subtle things that only apply to a small group of folks. The only reason I try to drill down on it is that small group of folks tend to be the ones reaching out to me. I have a decent amount of folks with injuries and some with pretty serious illness so I'm trying to best inform myself. For a home sleeper weight isn't an issue so in some cases the Amok could be a very viable option to put on the table... especially for those challenged by space issues as bridges do have a longer tree to tree pitch than a gathered end or Amok.

    One concern some of my customers have is entry and exit too... some bigger folks have a real hard time scooping themselves back out of gathered end. (Or a saggy couch, low chair, etc) The bridge can really help with that- especially if you nail the height above ground just right and follow my instructions about laying down your torso before you swing in your feet. That reduces swing quite a bit too. I'd be curious to see if the Amok offers some help in that area too however. It looks a bit intimidating at first... but like many things you can probably figure it out. Provided you don't swing into a bush and cry about it that is Though on a more serious note; Some folks have mentioned they feel like they need to 'push off' to get their butt far enough into the Amok so they don't have to work their worm moves too much to get into position... which does get the whole thing swinging pretty hard to start.

    I believe first in helping folks... even if that means 'selling' them another product. I've done this gear thing long enough that while I'm a gear nerd for sure, I'm fairly dispassionate about the gear itself. Anyone talking about the 'best' gear is usually on the wrong track in my opinion, or if you're feeling generous you could say they are describing what works well for them. I like to honestly evaluate the pros and cons for a given user and help them pick their 'best'.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Valpo, IN
    Hammock
    Towns-End Luxury Bridge
    Posts
    1,310
    Quote Originally Posted by Beemermcr View Post
    2+ years, nightly, in Just Bill's Big Guy Bridge: what he said! No more straight forward person to deal with!
    Thanks for chiming in... Speaking of bargains; at well under fifty cents a night now (plus two pieces of tenacious tape ) you're doing pretty good!

  6. #16
    Senior Member spidennis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    south padre island, tx
    Hammock
    DL 1.7 Blackbird
    Tarp
    SuperFly/snakeskin
    Insulation
    exped 9 dlx, sb UQ
    Suspension
    warbonnet straps
    Posts
    621
    Images
    2
    See my post about the 16 hammock by ticket to the moon. I just ordered one. Free shipping.

  7. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sandy, UT
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Thanks for chiming in... Speaking of bargains; at well under fifty cents a night now (plus two pieces of tenacious tape ) you're doing pretty good!
    Yeah, average cost per night dropping consistently - and the tape is holding perfectly from my attempted pole launch!

  8. #18
    Senior Member stevebo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Moreland Georgia
    Hammock
    WBRR
    Tarp
    diy sil argon camo
    Insulation
    lynx
    Suspension
    whoopie slings
    Posts
    1,803
    Quote Originally Posted by rhughesnc View Post
    Hi, Just got a Hennessy Jungle XL Zip and at 6'5" it just seems tight. Spoke with Dream Hammock, amazing customer service, and they suggested a 72" wide 11" long hammock. I wanted the double layer since I will be using a pad instead of a UQ. Any thoughts on width, size over all, and how best to side sleep for a very large human?

    Thanks
    Heres my experience as a big guy in a hammock (6'4, 240 lbs, with broad shoulders) I tried a gathered end hammock for years--at my height, I never got it to work very well, and found it hard to keep warm. My next step was to try a bridge hammock. I have a warbonnet ridge runner. (Im pretty close to the height limit for that hammock but it works ok) Sleeping on my back at my height, its pretty comfy, but I really cant sleep well on my side. (on the plus side, with the lynx uq, keeping warm is really easy) The Ridge runner is a wonderful hammock--easy to set up, tough as nails, and pretty comfy, but.........................I snore alot when I sleep on my back, so I just sleep ok in it. (I've logged close to 100 nights in mine and its still going strong!)

    I wanted to try something else, so I bought a big guy bridge from just bill several weeks ago. Wow! This is a beautiful hammock--extremely well built, I really like it! Lots of room to move around in, really comfy----its really nice! As far as the cost, you are purchasing a very strong durable hammock that should last many, many years. As far as the weight, yeah its a bit heavier, but i think there are ways to manage that. (I'm working on a trekking pole mod for the head end, I have a set of CF poles for the foot end, maybe a lighter bug net, a hybrid uq, etc) I dont know about you , but in my opinion a good nights sleep is priceless! Some guys carry a camp stool---for the same weight Im willing carry a heavier hammock in return for a great nights sleep! HYOH! (as an added bonus, Just Bill is great to deal with, and be sure to check out his book--its one of my favorites!) Any way, thats my experience-------------Good luck!
    FYI: If you want to know what type a certain bear is, sneak up behind it and kick it. Then,
    run like crazy and climb up a tree. If the bear climbs the tree and eats you, it's a black
    bear. If the bear just pushes the tree over and eats you, it's a grizzly bear : )


    Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me, either, just leave me alone.
    --unknown

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK
    Hammock
    Amok Draumr 3.0
    Tarp
    Amok
    Insulation
    Synmat 9 LW
    Suspension
    cinch buckles
    Posts
    1,493
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    (Though technically wouldn't you let out or loosen the leg strap to add slack and drop the footbox?)
    nope, it works exactly the opposite of how you'd think. when the strap is full out, the foot is as flat as it gets. when you tighten the strap, it moves the tension inward, to behind your knee, and lets the foot end droop

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post



    One concern some of my customers have is entry and exit too... I'd be curious to see if the Amok offers some help in that area too however.
    getting out of the amok draumr is possibly the easiest thing in the world. it's literally like getting out of a recliner. put it in chair mode (tighten straps) and then just lean forward. as your feet get close to the ground, just move them outside the foot box, and lean forward until you're standing up

    getting in is a whole other ball of wax. for folks with short legs like me (30 inch inseam) it's pretty ungainly. for taller folks, it's MUCH easier to straddle and sit back.

    other option is to enter like the HT90, and kinda angle in from the side, holding the edges, like a ridgerunner

    once it warms up, I'll try to shoot some vid of what I mean

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    se ohio
    Hammock
    Amok dramur xl
    Tarp
    Wb superfly
    Insulation
    Fjol xl pad
    Suspension
    Webbing/buckles
    Posts
    196
    Another vote for the amok dramur xl.

  • + New Posts
  • Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. Best expedition style hammock for tall people (6'3"), on a budget.
      By northcoastmountainrat in forum Introduce Yourself
      Replies: 10
      Last Post: 11-22-2011, 12:18
    2. Best expedition style hammock for tall people (6'3"), on a budget.
      By northcoastmountainrat in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: 11-16-2011, 21:18
    3. Best hammock for bad back 6'8" tall person indoors?
      By lwallace15 in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 28
      Last Post: 01-06-2011, 18:12

    Tags for this Thread

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •