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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by brohawk View Post
    Ah...I just got home from work and read this. Thanks neighbor but I just ordered a ridge Creek 3 season. Gonna hit Pinchot trail over memorial day weekend and try it out. That is if it ever stops raining here in Northeast PA.
    Did you get the 3/4 or full length? Curious as to what you think about it after your outing.

  2. #12
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlTrailDog View Post
    I purchased a AHD Ridgecreek when I had a WBRR. As my first foray into using a UQ instead of an insulated pad. The reasons for choosing a synthetic UQ have been listed by others. The WBRR has long been passed along for others to enjoy as I found other hammock styles more to my preference. But I still use the Ridgecreek with both GE hammocks, but especially with my Hammocktent 90 degree hammocks. When I am backpacking I typically go with a down UQ for good weather and an insulated pad for hinky weather. Another great use for the AHD is when weight and room are not constraints and abuse is more likely. For instance, if I am truck camping I wouldn't hesitate to take the AHD for a campground or roaded location because I know it will handle any potential abuse, keep me warm, and I have to worry less about losing an expensive piece of gear if Bubba, Flavia, or their kids happen across my campsite while I off on other pursuits, e.g .biking, fishing, floating, day hiking, and etc.
    Re: the AHE RC used on the 90*: as an inner quilt, or as a suspended outer quilt? With or without a pad in the pocket? Must work pretty good?

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Re: the AHE RC used on the 90*: as an inner quilt, or as a suspended outer quilt? With or without a pad in the pocket? Must work pretty good?
    Unfortunately I have committed not to reveal that information by a vendor who thought the idea was interesting enough to keep under wraps until they have had time to assess bringing it to market. Based on their posts they have been developing a number of projects over the year which means they are actively coming up with new ideas, but apparently have not had the time to press forward on this particular project.

    However, do not give up hope. Perhaps it will even turn up in Popular Science as a news scope similar to the "Prototype Truck X Spotted At Testing Grounds", e.g. Radical new Hammock Design Spotted, unfortunately we have been unable to wake testers for comment due to loud snoring from deep REM sleep.

  4. #14
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    OK, thanks!

  5. #15
    Senior Member Brady's Avatar
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    I realize this is an old thread but I wanted to follow this up as I do a lot of subzero camping in Canada, both hanging or tenting depending on the situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by brohawk View Post
    Any pros and cons with the climashield vs the traditional down?
    They are different animals that do the same thing, but differently. In extended cold conditions, I much prefer a modular system. As an example, I will stack quilts, down inner, synthetic outer. In any winter camping, over time you will have moisture build-up and you will get that in the outer quilt, so I much prefer it to be synthetic as it will still insulate very well when wet, whereas downs performance decreases drastically.

    With modern down treatments, it's pretty hard to get down wet so if you're doing short trips, both are great options. That said, you'll pay a slight weight penalty for the synthetic but have zero worries about moisture. You have to consider what works for you. I live on the West Coast of Canada, which is a temperate rainforest and we get buckets of water and in 8 years of hammocking, I have never had a wet underquilt for a short 3-5 day trip in the most horrific rain the coast can throw at us (and I didn't use a UQP either).

    The only time I have ever had an issue was actually at the tree line when a cold downflow brought moisture from the top of the mountain and my outer layer of the down quilt was soaked despite hanging my tarp super low on the upward side of the mountain but I buried that side in the snow the next morning and the quilt dried out during the day.

    When stacking thinner quilts (which while heavier is more efficient for warmth), a down inner and synthetic has kept me warm (and dry) to -40C/-40F while long term tent camping without ever having to dry my inner down sleeping bag. In the hammock, I have stacked a 0F and a 20F, both down, at -30C/-22F and been warm but after 5 days the outer quilt started to lose loft due to moisture build up. I weighed my -30C MEC quilt years ago and it was about 3 pounds before the trip. After 12 days in -30 in a tent with no fire, it weighed 7 pounds when I got home and I was getting a bit chilled at night. At the time, I didn't know what had happened but when I was unpacking the bag I felt the weight was more so I weighed it in the garage before coming into the house. Two days later it was back to normal weight while hanging in the laundry room, so that was pure moisture.

    Quote Originally Posted by brohawk View Post
    And do you guys think the climashield is any warmer for its weight?
    Climashield isn't warmer for its weight unless it's an extended trip where frost/moisture build up degrades the down insulation. But that still doesn't matter as technically, down is still lighter for the weight, especially some of the higher fills.

    Final note. Even for less extreme temps, I'm still a fan of stacking lighter rated quilts. The increase in weight is justified if you are on a longer trip.

    Hope that helps future readers.
    Brady

  6. #16
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady View Post
    I realize this is an old thread but I wanted to follow this up as I do a lot of subzero camping in Canada, both hanging or tenting depending on the situation.



    They are different animals that do the same thing, but differently. In extended cold conditions, I much prefer a modular system. As an example, I will stack quilts, down inner, synthetic outer. In any winter camping, over time you will have moisture build-up and you will get that in the outer quilt, so I much prefer it to be synthetic as it will still insulate very well when wet, whereas downs performance decreases drastically.

    With modern down treatments, it's pretty hard to get down wet so if you're doing short trips, both are great options. That said, you'll pay a slight weight penalty for the synthetic but have zero worries about moisture. You have to consider what works for you. I live on the West Coast of Canada, which is a temperate rainforest and we get buckets of water and in 8 years of hammocking, I have never had a wet underquilt for a short 3-5 day trip in the most horrific rain the coast can throw at us (and I didn't use a UQP either).

    The only time I have ever had an issue was actually at the tree line when a cold downflow brought moisture from the top of the mountain and my outer layer of the down quilt was soaked despite hanging my tarp super low on the upward side of the mountain but I buried that side in the snow the next morning and the quilt dried out during the day.

    When stacking thinner quilts (which while heavier is more efficient for warmth), a down inner and synthetic has kept me warm (and dry) to -40C/-40F while long term tent camping without ever having to dry my inner down sleeping bag. In the hammock, I have stacked a 0F and a 20F, both down, at -30C/-22F and been warm but after 5 days the outer quilt started to lose loft due to moisture build up. I weighed my -30C MEC quilt years ago and it was about 3 pounds before the trip. After 12 days in -30 in a tent with no fire, it weighed 7 pounds when I got home and I was getting a bit chilled at night. At the time, I didn't know what had happened but when I was unpacking the bag I felt the weight was more so I weighed it in the garage before coming into the house. Two days later it was back to normal weight while hanging in the laundry room, so that was pure moisture.



    Climashield isn't warmer for its weight unless it's an extended trip where frost/moisture build up degrades the down insulation. But that still doesn't matter as technically, down is still lighter for the weight, especially some of the higher fills.

    Final note. Even for less extreme temps, I'm still a fan of stacking lighter rated quilts. The increase in weight is justified if you are on a longer trip.

    Hope that helps future readers.
    Wow! Thanks for some practical info from some one who is out there in severe conditions for more than a night or two! I personally am an occasional user of vapor barrier(VB) clothing, which has kept my body moisture from wicking into or the vapor from condensing in my layers of insulation. It is incredible- but believable- that your quilt more than doubled in weight in 12 days! Now that is some serious and major condensation within a breathable product! Just shows that if the dew point is reached, condensation is happening, whether something is breathable or not! 4 lbs of moisture weight gain, amazing!

    You say: "In the hammock, I have stacked a 0F and a 20F, both down, at -30C/-22F and been warm but after 5 days the outer quilt started to lose loft due to moisture build up". What about your synthetic quilts? Did you ever notice them ever loseing loft, especially when stacked as the outer quilt?

    I never have, even when I was NOT using VBs, when my buddy lost some loft with down quilts after 5 days in the Olympic Rain Forest of WA state. But, I was also not at those way below zero F temps like you have been. I did, however, get some bad condensation in my foot box, due to user error(I did something wrong on the very first night of the trip). But I stayed warm and had no loss of loft. Plus, it dried quickly.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 02-08-2020 at 11:08.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Brady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    What about your synthetic quilts? Did you ever notice them ever loseing loft, especially when stacked as the outer quilt?
    [/COLOR]
    I have never found my synthetic quilts to lose loft or insulating properties. Similar to wool, most synthetics will insulate even when wet. Think fleece, even if you jump into a cold river, once you are back on dry land, your fleece will drain the moisture and you will warm up again very quickly. That's why rafting guides recommend wool or synthetic fleece for raft trips.

    Nunatak (https://nunatakusa.com/) coincidentally makes a quilt based on the principles I shared called the Nebula as a single unit instead of modular like I prefer. I didn't have anything to do with that FYI, just similar thoughts I think. Also, their Nova insulated bivy is synthetic, but for colder temps they recommend a down inner quilt. Same principle in action.

    The downside to synthetic is lifespan. They last at least half as long as a down quilt depending on how either is cared for. I prefer products that last longer normally, but I believe a quilt outer will last longer than advertised as it's not getting oils from your skin on it because of the layering and thus requires less laundering. So breakdown occurs from stuffing the bag into a sack, which I don't, I just put it with my down in the bottom of my pack in a trash bag and I pick a trip appropriate size bag so it doesn't get so compressed. I like going light, but not at the sacrifice of gear life.




    Sent from my SM-N975W using Tapatalk
    Brady

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