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  1. #21
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
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    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
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    CVKealey - thank you for the info on the $4.99 spool. I wasn't so clear when describing my guy lines. At this time, I don't use LashIt or any "high strength" cord. For guy lines, I use green, reflective, Nite-eze cord. For the tarp ridge line, I use 3mm utility cord sold by REI at $5.00/50 ft hank. I use "the big stuff" because I find it easier to deal with knots, loops, hitches - especially when it is cold/wet/freezing. I do avoid such conditions if I can. It is just easier for me to work with the thicker cord and I don't mind the weight.

    If I'm not using something mechanical - like a Figure-9 - I'd use a tautline hitch. But I didn't like that because of the need to make the "wraps" by pulling through the whole line. I could do the wraps with the cord doubled as a long slippery loop. But this forum gave me another knot to use. I don't recall the name but it's sort of like a prussic wrap. The feature is, you don't have to pull the tail of the line through the wraps.

    I'm finding I like some bungee on the tarp corner tie outs, but I don't want to rely on just the bungee strength and wearability - hence my mention of a LashIt backup. I've seen some interesting combinations, including having the bungee "hidden" inside the weave of the stronger cord (and sometimes the cord inside the stretchy material - like rubber tubing).

    We are just now getting temps in the 80's and as Daffodils raise their little heads out of the ground, so various "setup" ideas pop up in the mind with respect hammocks and tarps. Who knows, this might be the summer I finally seam seal the panel pullouts on my SuperFly (and now ThunderFly). Ideas are easy. Follow through action, not so much.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Hammock
    WB RR, DIY Bridge (Dutch Kit)
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    Kammok Glider
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    DIY TQ, DIY BQ
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    Whoopsie Slings
    Posts
    360
    I leave my lines attached to my DIY tarp to which I've added Velcro loops at each point. It takes me a minute or two to figure-8 the lines and then open the Velcro and wrap it around the lines. I know I'm adding some grams to the weight but it makes it very easy to keep all the lines organized. For the cost of some lines it never seemed to be worth switching lines -- I just make up lines for each tarp and leave them attached. Never forget them. They get dried out when the tarp gets dried out.

  3. #23
    MikekiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    East of Montauk, NY
    Hammock
    DIY
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    HG DCF Stnd + WP
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    Kevlar + Beckett
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    3,115
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    21
    Always keep them attached to the tarp.

    Stakes go in a DCF Taco bag with tree straps.
    _______________________________________
    The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

    You wonder why I love to sleep alone, in the woods, in a hammock.. I wonder why you don't...

  4. #24
    Senior Member TreeBeard13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    "The Shire" SC PA
    Hammock
    DIY
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    154
    Quote Originally Posted by CVKealey View Post
    I see your point. Using Lash-it or Zing-it, that could get costly. Figuring 24' of line per tarp (4x guy lines 6' long each), outfitting 4 tarps would be roughly $16 (assuming you bought a 180' spool of cord @ $29 or 16 cents/foot.) However, as popular as those are for tie-outs, I think line that strong is overkill. I've been using Atwood micro-cord (1.18 mm diameter, 100 pound breaking strength). This is available a bunch of places, but Dutch sells it for $4.99 (125' spool); that'll do all 4 tarps with 25' left over for backup/spares/other projects. It's also half the weight of Lash/Zing-it.
    I use zing it for the tarp line, but not the tie outs. I use mason's string from Lowes/HD to tie outs. It's low stretch, super cheap and plenty strong. It's hollow core so you can actually splice with it. I made a lil tiny 8" whoopie sling out of it... But it's so small/thin its MADDENING to do so! I don't have them permanently attached, but I usually attach them before hand if backpacking. If I'm going "car camping" I don't bother unless it is supposed to be raining when I get there. I can attach them in the car if it's pouring.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    I always like going South; somehow, it feels like going downhill.

    ...and as it harm none, do what ye will.

  5. #25
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Westerly, RI
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    18
    Quote Originally Posted by cougarmeat View Post
    CVKealey - But this forum gave me another knot to use. I don't recall the name but it's sort of like a prussic wrap. The feature is, you don't have to pull the tail of the line through the wraps
    It sounds like you might be describing the Farrimond Friction Hitch, a very easy knot (actually a hitch) to tie and untie which I just started using. You're right. You don't have to loop the tag end over and over the standing part as you have to with a taut line hitch and you don't have to do that either to untie it.

    There are some very clever knots out there. As much as I admire all the Dutch bling available out there, I like to just depend on the cordage to do the job.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Montco, PA
    Hammock
    11' Dutchware Netless
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    WL Tadpole
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    HG Econ
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    102
    Quote Originally Posted by Orthofingers View Post
    It sounds like you might be describing the Farrimond Friction Hitch, a very easy knot (actually a hitch) to tie and untie which I just started using. You're right. You don't have to loop the tag end over and over the standing part as you have to with a taut line hitch and you don't have to do that either to untie it.

    There are some very clever knots out there. As much as I admire all the Dutch bling available out there, I like to just depend on the cordage to do the job.
    Dutch makes some nice stuff and I have a set of hookworms which I used for a while, but nowadays I find it easier to just attach the line to stakes with a marlin spike hitch. With the shock cord loops on the tarp, there's really no need to tensioning hardware. I also liked the hookworms for the "quick disconnect" aspect, but I'm trying some tiny little s-biners (Nite-ize keychain type) in their place on one side of my tarps. Basically, this replicates the hookworms' ability to unhook one side of the tarp and flip it to the other side of the ridgeline if I want to.

  7. #27
    MDCrab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
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    DIY 10' Robic 1.2
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    Gorilla Fortress
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    HG Econ 20 Incu
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    Straps w rings
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    203
    I'm another that keeps the guy lines attached. I use braided masons line from the hardware store. In orange and black. Easy to see, inexpensive, light and a 500 pound rating. I hope my tarp never experiences those kind of forces. I use the same line for my tarp continuous ridge line. I have 2 prussics on the ridge line and use 2 tiny s-biners to attach it to the tarp. it all goes into the mesh snake skins. I've never forgotten anything and it dries out when I dry out the tarp. Always quick and easy to set up. Hairbands on all tie outs to maintain tension and reduce strain. Tweeked and still tweekin.
    Lucky me, lucky mud. - Kurt Vonnegut.

  8. #28
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
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    DH Darien #6235, #7111
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    HG hex, hex w/door
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    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
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    1,434
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    Guylines stay with the tarp, and stakes, too, rolled up in a thick (freezer) ziploc bag.

    Keeps everything together in a complete unit, and tarp deployment is that much quicker not having to add more steps to the process. Really makes a difference when it's raining!
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

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