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  1. #11
    Senior Member Tyroler Holzhacker's Avatar
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    you could vent the warmer UQ to stay cooler. The 20 degree down UQ is really the "goldilocks" UQ that most hangers start with. Since you live in the PNW, you may also consider a synthetic UQ like climashield apex. SLD Trailwinder might fit the bill.

  2. #12
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    Depending on your pack weight, hike mileage, disposable income, in order of increasing expense, you might want to:
    1. Start with a gathered end hammock (WB Eldorado, Dutch Cameleon or similar).
    2. Use a foam pad under you and an unzipped sleeping bag above.
    3. Buy an under quilt. I agree a 20 degree underquilt is the "Goldielocks" underquilt. (Hammock Gear Econ Incubator=good value) and continue using a sleeping bag as a top quilt. An underquilt eliminates the hassle of trying to keep the foam pad under you.
    4. When $ allows, get a topquilt. A 20 or 30 degree quilt is versatile.
    5. You hit the lottery. Buy a -20 degree Wooki, summer quilts, underquilt protector, Cuben fiber tarps, all of the Dutch bling, bridge hammock, etc., etc., etc.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Howler View Post
    Would the 20ºF be just way too much during the summer when the lows are usually right around 55ºF though?

    I guess I should also add that i am a pretty warm sleeper. I tend to keep a window open year round and cover up the heat vents in my room so I worry about just roasting alive.
    If you're in a gathered end- keep in mind the UQ is doing most of the work.

    When stacking quilts- my philosophy is there are three seasons- exactly what temp range they are is up to you.

    High summer- for me lows around 60 or so- typically I use a 45* synthetic in the humid midwest or a sheet.
    Three season- For me lowest temp around freezing- I always take down.
    Winter- I like to be covered to about zero- now it's stacking time.

    As you have been advised: a 20* (or maybe 30* for a hot sleeper who says 55* is their average need) is a good place to start.

    Point being- that's what you would want to start with if you were building a stacking system regardless.
    The second piece to buy would be that summer piece.

    The formula for quilt stacking is 70*- the outer quilt's rating is what you ADD to the base quilt.
    So 70*-50* (for an average summer quilt) means 20* gets added to your base quilt.

    If 30* is more versatile for you... adding a summer quilt to your gear closet would mean you could hit about 10*.

    Choose the base quilt based upon what you will use 80% of the time.
    Summer or three season. Then when budget allows add the other; and you get the third quilt free.

    Keep in mind; if you plan to stack quilts put some thought into building that system.
    You may need to consider a vendor who sells a few options so the quilts stack well.
    You may want a sewn footbox in the three season and an adjustable footbox (opens up) for your summer quilt. That way you are not fighting with it.
    You may want to pick a quilt with tabs or pad attachments so you have handy points to join the quilts when stacked.

    Nobody can say exactly what you would want but the basic systems are usually

    40/20= zero stacked
    50/30= 10 stacked

    Most of us are not really out in the winter as much as we might think... so doing summer/three season makes sense and a dedicated winter set isn't in the budget.

    Some of us hate the summer and do camp more in winter (or live further north) so you may consider an early three season/late season setup like a 30/10 combo which would put you closer to -20 when stacked.

    Wait you say, should that be -30? yes... but that 70-outer quilt formula (like all insulation formulas) starts to break down a bit as you pass zero degrees F. Once you pass zero- take 10* off the stacked system. Good plan to knock about 5* off as you approach zero, and another 5* if the fit is sloppy. The quilt stacking system is very versatile, but not perfect, so add more grains of salt as you drop lower and try to find a safe place to practice with it (where you can bail to warm up) until you establish trust in your combo.

    FWIW- like others mentioned- I like having a sewn footbox and simply putting one foot out.
    This makes it very easy to regulate your sleeping temp- though as I said above- the UQ is doing lots of work so in some GE hammocks you may not be able to regulate as much as you hope. On the ground or in a bridge; you've got plenty of air moving around you and you can afford to go a little overboard on the TQ rating vs a GE TQ.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howler View Post
    Sounds like maybe a warmer topquilt might be my best bet after all - if I want to ask about UQ's do I need to make a separate post in that section?
    Or can someone speak to using a cold weather UQ in summer weather? Since it cant so easily just be pushed off of the body like a TQ can.
    If you can't vent your UQ enough (by loosening the suspension and or venting the ends) you can always reach under the hammock and pull the UQ to the side until you need it- usually in the early AM. This is what I do with my 20* UGQ Zepplin and it has worked well so far. In the heat of the summer here I use a DIY/PLUQ and often have it pulled off to the side until @4 or 5am.

  5. #15
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    I went the DIY layering route. I bought 4 Costco down throws and 4 JC Penny synthetic throws for <$100. some elbow grease and I have 4 UQs and 4 TQs that are possibly rated for 55F or (fingers crossed) 50F. so if lows are 60+ I only need 1 set, if 45+ take 2 sets, 30F+ 3 sets and above 15F all four sets. I've tested the single set, and when hung properly it did work down to 60 just fine and last winter 3 sets and thermals got me to about 20. even during the summer i'll pack a set of thermals, just in case I misread the forecast or it gets a little windy, or my assumptions of temp rating are …..off!

  6. #16
    Senior Member arcana73's Avatar
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    Get a 20 degree quilt, and a cheap $20 down blanket from Costco/Amazon or what not. 20 will get you through most times, and when it's going to be really warm just use the down blanket.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Bad Biscuit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcana73 View Post
    Get a 20 degree quilt, and a cheap $20 down blanket from Costco/Amazon or what not. 20 will get you through most times, and when it's going to be really warm just use the down blanket.
    ^ This is exactly what I do.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    "There's not much of a learning curve with a tent. Lay on the ground and suffer; repeat as often as necessary." - Silvrsurfr

    http://jnunniv.wordpress.com

  8. #18
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    I decided to go with a UGQ Bandit 20, will report back on how it works for me after a handful of nights in it!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howler View Post
    I decided to go with a UGQ Bandit 20, will report back on how it works for me after a handful of nights in it!
    That’s my setup (with a 1oz overstuff) and a 20 degree Zeppelin UQ. Eastern Oregon was warm last weekend. Kept the UQ in place and tossed the TQ aside until midnight or so when the dry air temps dropped. Kept the footbox unzipped and the drawstring very loose. This was very comfortable.

  10. #20
    StrungUpNewfoundlander's Avatar
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    Ordering my first TQ and, from this thread thus far, believe 20deg F. is the way to go (I have a 20g UQ, afterall).

    I have width options of 52", 55", and 58". I won't be using it other than in the hammock and weight isn't really an issue (canoe camper). Any reason why 58" would be too much?
    Best Kind

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