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  1. #11
    ahursey530's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Dublin, NC
    Hammock
    WBBBXLC/Eldorado
    Tarp
    WB Thunder/Mtn fly
    Insulation
    WBWookie/EEEnigma
    Suspension
    DClips/BeatleBuckl
    Posts
    75
    You could carry two pieces of climbing grade webbing. Its tubular so you could run the tarp suspension through it if necessary.
    20190908_130020.jpg

    I would guess you can get that in 2" also.

  2. #12
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Valrico, FL
    Posts
    3
    I've been camping almost every month of the year, for years, with a Florida Scout troop. I'm encountering similar webbing-size requirements in many State Parks, some local county parks, our favorite state forest, and even on our local water-management district land.

    I've run into these park-specific webbing-size rules over the past two-three years that I've mostly converted to hammock camping, but I'm also encountering more and more local, park-specific hammock bans as well. But for suspension, somehow 2" minimum webbing-size is getting to be a the new standard in Florida.

    I'm also seeing this 2-inch "requirement" in some local parks for both front-country and back-country campsites.

    While I don't really see an advantage to the trees I typically use by using extra inch of webbing-width, moving to 2" suspensions across our whole Boy Scout Troop has helped us get the blessing of some particularly skeptical park representatives. And I'm taking that as a win for all of us hammock lovers.

    I've had some very respectful conversations with a few rangers and some "camp hosts" which led to us being granted an exception to hang even under a local ban, and our 2" webbing has seemed to be a big reason why.

    Sometimes, those initial conversations just didn't seem quite friendly enough to ask for an exception, especially considering I've typically camped with a mixed group of teenagers and adults where anywhere from 10-20 of us have converted to hammocks. In those cases, it was better to just salute and smile (and unfortunately, sleep on the ground).

    But, we've helped to strengthen our case for hammocks over the last year and hopefully spread a better image of hammockers (and cut down on negative comments from park volunteers and/or professional staff) mostly by embracing 2" webbing as our internal standard, slash "olive branch", suspension.

    Our youth have also gone fully-educational among themselves, and that helps too. Now, most youth in my Troop, it seems, can explain in detail all the intentional things they are doing to protect the trees in our campsites, what suspension gear we're using, and even why we're using certain items. This helps us a lot - and it's encouraging to see the next generation hanging in a positive way rather than expanding the problems that some parks/forests indicate has led to their new rules and/or hammock bans. And even better, our youth implemented this on their own, not because the adults required it.

    As to 2" webbing, last summer we made a project for ourselves to create a common setup of 2" webbing suspensions, and we carry enough sets to cover all of us on all car-camping weekends (the whole collection of webbing setups that our youth created to cover something like 35+ hammocks all fits in a very small Rubbermade container that easily fits in anyone's car trunk). For backpacking or canoe-camping weekends, we've simply "issued" suspension kits to anyone who needed one and they got packed in individual backpacks/dry-bags.

    Ive witnessed our common, "oversized" suspensions be enough to occasionally get us permission to hang where we wouldn't have been able to do so otherwise. In some cases, simple 2" webbing was enough to make local park staff friendly about a group of teenagers hanging on their trees (which is something!).

    After a few "campsite walkthroughs" earlier in 2019 where a park or state forest representative has negatively commented on our tarp ridgelines being too thin or "touching bark", we've also taken to using short sections of hollow 4" webbing to wrap around our tarp ridgelines where they contact trees. Again, an "olive branch", if you will.

    Our youth made enough of these "tree protector" ridgeline-covers" for the whole Troop, and they now also live in the same Rubbermade box with our suspension kits. We used hollow, 4 inch webbing-sections because we happened to have a spool on-hand, thus it was "free", but I suspect something much smaller would also keep us in the good graces of our local landowners.

    So, while I'm generally skeptical that 2" webbing and webbing-protectors for tarp-suspension are really "the" things for saving trees from damage, embracing those two items across our whole campsite has helped us get us permission to hang more often.

    And again, I'm considering that a win since it keeps my aging back off the ground!

  3. #13
    New Member Rice-N-beans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    South Florida.
    Hammock
    GT SB ,GT double, Dutch Chameleon
    Tarp
    Etowah 10x10
    Suspension
    Dutch cinch buckle
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Cabmanhang View Post
    I stayed at Wakiwa State Park in Florida (Beautiful Springs)a couple of years ago. They had the rule written at 1" at the time, but I made sure to mention to the Rangers that I was a hammock camper. They were happy to have us there, but were adamant that the tree must be over 14" in girth and that they required 2" straps in that particular park, because of past experiences. I mentioned the written rule and their words were "We require 2" straps in this park because of past issues and each park Ranger can make a determination based on the needs of the particular park."

    I wanted to comply, but honestly had no 2 inch straps. I illustrated my concern for the trees, explained my predicament, and layed out a plan to double wrap my 1" suspension and use sticks underneath to distribute the load. I also used sticks underneath my tarp suspension. They said they would come and check it later, but I may have to GTG if it didn't work out.

    Rangers came by, checked on the setup, said it was fine and then thanked me for being conscientious of the health of the trees. All in all, in the Southeast, I have had very few bad experiences with Rangers. Mostly good people trying to protect their product.

    Hopefully, the experience I had with these rangers may have paved the way for some other hammockers who found themselves stuck in a similar situation and the Rangers could advise the camper on how to use their 1 inch straps in a way that was suitable to the Park.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahursey530 View Post
    You could carry two pieces of climbing grade webbing. Its tubular so you could run the tarp suspension through it if necessary.
    20190908_130020.jpg

    I would guess you can get that in 2" also.
    Quote Originally Posted by FL_Rick View Post
    I've been camping almost every month of the year, for years, with a Florida Scout troop. I'm encountering similar webbing-size requirements in many State Parks, some local county parks, our favorite state forest, and even on our local water-management district land.

    I've run into these park-specific webbing-size rules over the past two-three years that I've mostly converted to hammock camping, but I'm also encountering more and more local, park-specific hammock bans as well. But for suspension, somehow 2" minimum webbing-size is getting to be a the new standard in Florida.

    I'm also seeing this 2-inch "requirement" in some local parks for both front-country and back-country campsites.

    While I don't really see an advantage to the trees I typically use by using extra inch of webbing-width, moving to 2" suspensions across our whole Boy Scout Troop has helped us get the blessing of some particularly skeptical park representatives. And I'm taking that as a win for all of us hammock lovers.

    I've had some very respectful conversations with a few rangers and some "camp hosts" which led to us being granted an exception to hang even under a local ban, and our 2" webbing has seemed to be a big reason why.

    Sometimes, those initial conversations just didn't seem quite friendly enough to ask for an exception, especially considering I've typically camped with a mixed group of teenagers and adults where anywhere from 10-20 of us have converted to hammocks. In those cases, it was better to just salute and smile (and unfortunately, sleep on the ground).

    But, we've helped to strengthen our case for hammocks over the last year and hopefully spread a better image of hammockers (and cut down on negative comments from park volunteers and/or professional staff) mostly by embracing 2" webbing as our internal standard, slash "olive branch", suspension.

    Our youth have also gone fully-educational among themselves, and that helps too. Now, most youth in my Troop, it seems, can explain in detail all the intentional things they are doing to protect the trees in our campsites, what suspension gear we're using, and even why we're using certain items. This helps us a lot - and it's encouraging to see the next generation hanging in a positive way rather than expanding the problems that some parks/forests indicate has led to their new rules and/or hammock bans. And even better, our youth implemented this on their own, not because the adults required it.

    As to 2" webbing, last summer we made a project for ourselves to create a common setup of 2" webbing suspensions, and we carry enough sets to cover all of us on all car-camping weekends (the whole collection of webbing setups that our youth created to cover something like 35+ hammocks all fits in a very small Rubbermade container that easily fits in anyone's car trunk). For backpacking or canoe-camping weekends, we've simply "issued" suspension kits to anyone who needed one and they got packed in individual backpacks/dry-bags.

    Ive witnessed our common, "oversized" suspensions be enough to occasionally get us permission to hang where we wouldn't have been able to do so otherwise. In some cases, simple 2" webbing was enough to make local park staff friendly about a group of teenagers hanging on their trees (which is something!).

    After a few "campsite walkthroughs" earlier in 2019 where a park or state forest representative has negatively commented on our tarp ridgelines being too thin or "touching bark", we've also taken to using short sections of hollow 4" webbing to wrap around our tarp ridgelines where they contact trees. Again, an "olive branch", if you will.

    Our youth made enough of these "tree protector" ridgeline-covers" for the whole Troop, and they now also live in the same Rubbermade box with our suspension kits. We used hollow, 4 inch webbing-sections because we happened to have a spool on-hand, thus it was "free", but I suspect something much smaller would also keep us in the good graces of our local landowners.

    So, while I'm generally skeptical that 2" webbing and webbing-protectors for tarp-suspension are really "the" things for saving trees from damage, embracing those two items across our whole campsite has helped us get us permission to hang more often.

    And again, I'm considering that a win since it keeps my aging back off the ground!


    Thank you for all the info, I highly appreciate it!

    I went and ordered 2' seat-belt webbing tree huggers from Dutch to wrap around the tree, I will be ordering 2" hollow webbing for my tarp CRL.

    I plan on wrapping the 2" tree hugger strap around the tree, then using a larkshead knot to attach my 1" strap to the open loop on the 2" tree hugger, that way I can still use my Dutch cinch buckle suspension. I will slip my CRL through the 2" hollow webbing at either end of the trees, this should satisfy the Park Rangers.


    https://dutchwaregear.com/product/se...ons-dutchware/

    https://www.strapworks.com/Nylon_Webbing_p/tnw2.htm


    Thanks again to all who have chimed in!

  4. #14
    ahursey530's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Dublin, NC
    Hammock
    WBBBXLC/Eldorado
    Tarp
    WB Thunder/Mtn fly
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    DClips/BeatleBuckl
    Posts
    75
    I was also thinking that old 1-1/2" fire hose would work and you might be able to pick some up for free at your local fire dept. Flattened out with the rubber lining removed it would be about 3" and wouldn't cost you a dime. Most fire hose is double jacketed so you would have a thicker lining to lay against the tree. Again you would probably want to remove the rubber lining. It comes right out if cut into short pieces.

  5. #15
    Senior Member 1-Hung-Low's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Hammock
    WB--Dutch-Clark-Amok
    Tarp
    WB-CC-UGQ-Amok
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    Down & Synthetic
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    Whoop N Straps
    Posts
    324
    I believe the 2" hollow webbing may look impressing, but I feel it's only window dressing as the inner 1.75mm line is really the only contact with the tree albeit with a small portion of nylon between it and the tree
    Liviní Large ~ Horizontally

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,722
    Quote Originally Posted by 1-Hung-Low View Post
    I believe the 2" hollow webbing may look impressing, but I feel it's only window dressing as the inner 1.75mm line is really the only contact with the tree albeit with a small portion of nylon between it and the tree


    Passing any suspension through tubular webbing is not the same as using wide suspension material.

  7. #17
    Phantom Grappler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Denton NC
    Hammock
    WildernessLogics 12x6
    Tarp
    HG cuben 13ridge12
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    TopQuiltUnderQuilt
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    Kokomo
    Posts
    3,009
    Quote Originally Posted by 1-Hung-Low View Post
    I believe the 2" hollow webbing may look impressing, but I feel it's only window dressing as the inner 1.75mm line is really the only contact with the tree albeit with a small portion of nylon between it and the tree
    Hung-Low, you are right. A thin line inside wider tubular flat line still has thin line pressure points against tree.
    On the other hand itís good to follow all park rules as enforced by specific park rangers. I think two inch rule for tarp lines is overkill...and there is nothing to stop the rule from going from one inch wide tarp lines to two inch wide tarp lines and then arbitrarily going to three inch wide tarp lines.
    Or going back to no lines, straps, or rope on any trees.
    Trees in heavily used camp grounds take a beating (mostly by kids with axes)
    Best to have good relations with park management, and support them in their goal to maintain park
    If Hammock campers in general leave a bad impression on park rangers, hammocks can be banned from certain parks, park systems, or entire states.
    We are our best ambassadors

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