Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    9
    Speaking from my own experience, I'm not sure it makes much difference what your quilt is rated when you are using a quilt in warmer temperatures. What I mean is a 0 or 10 or 20 deg quilt will feel about the same as a 40 deg quilt if you are using it on a 60 deg night, even a 0 deg quilt will not be uncomfortably warm. It only makes a difference when it's cold out and you need the insulation to maintain body heat.

    My experience is based on using my 0 deg quilts year round (actually a 0 deg under quilt and a 20 deg top quilt supplemented with a mummy sleeping bag when needed). Last October, when it started getting cooler, I decided to start sleeping outside every night for a while. After a couple of weeks I was really starting to enjoy being outdoors every night. After a month outdoors I wondered if I could go a whole two months straight. I have an open, but covered deck, so rain was no problem, though there were a few nights when I had to put up a tarp due to wind blown rain. After two months I wondered how cold it could get before I bugged out and went back to sleeping inside. The coldest it got here in Nashville last winter was 12 deg, and I stayed snug as a bug that night. And that coldest night was at the end of January. So, at 4 months in I thought why not try going six months. (You might say I was becoming obsessed!)

    I was relatively certain I wouldn't be able to handle the hot and humid summer nights we have here in the South, so I figured 6 months would be it. But nope, on October 15 I will have slept outside in a hammock every night for a year. And I've used a 0 deg under quilt all but about 4 or 5 nights this summer, and by the morning time I was wishing the quilt was under me a couple of those nights.

    I'm sure my body has just become acclimated to being outside every night so the temperature and humidity don't bother me so much. But the point I am trying to make is, unless pack weight is an issue, you probably only need one quilt for any temperature. Make it a quilt rated for the coldest (and then subtract 10 deg) you plan to go.
    Last edited by bncskc; 09-17-2019 at 12:45.

  2. #22
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    1,474
    I have all three (0/20/40) and the 20 degree is the most versatile. I very seldom "overheat" with down so I can use the warmer rated gear in a wide range - like using the 20 degree quits in the 40's. If I could only have one, it would be a set of 20's. Or maybe a 20 TQ and 0 UQ. Having various levels means I don't carry more bulk/weight than necessary. But it also requires I make a decision about what to bring and have to live with it if I get it wrong. If it is "iffy", I usually have some kind of warmer sleeping jacket add-on.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  3. #23
    aka 'Extra' MikekiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    East of Montauk, NY
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    HG DCF Stnd + WP
    Insulation
    HammockGear
    Suspension
    Kevlar + Beckett
    Posts
    3,349
    Images
    21
    40/30/20 underquilts.. the 40 is a 3/4. I bough the 30 full length with the intention of swapping the 20 for a 10. In due time.

    55/40/20 topquilts.. Those are keepers.

    My lowest temp was 16F with the 20F set and I was quite warm but my feet were cold.. added down booties this year in hopes I can make the 20F set work.

    All but the 55F are Hammock Gear. The 55 is a JuneBug Synthetic.
    * The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

    * I can lift all the weight I want at the gym. Walking shouldn't be a workout. ~ Just Bill


  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Maumee, OH
    Hammock
    Dutch Chameleon, DIY
    Tarp
    Dutchware Hex, DIY
    Insulation
    HG, DIY
    Suspension
    Straps, Beetles
    Posts
    297
    Images
    2
    I am pretty happy with just 2 sets...40* (Hammock gear Econ set), and 0* UGQ set. Seems to cover everything comfortably. 40* set all summer, and down to the mid 40’s. Lower than mid 40’s the zero set is excellent, and when it gets much below 10*, I add the 40* set stacked with the 0* set.

  5. #25
    HandyRandy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Louisiana
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Eldorado (Dream-Tex)
    Tarp
    Thunder/MiniFly
    Insulation
    Wooki, Diamondback
    Suspension
    Dynaweave, Becket
    Posts
    1,312
    Quote Originally Posted by bncskc View Post
    But nope, on October 15 I will have slept outside in a hammock every night for a year.
    Impressive streak! Probably a new record!

  6. #26
    Senior Member bkrgi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Terrace BC
    Hammock
    Robic XL 1.1oz 11'
    Tarp
    RSBTR PU4000 tarps
    Insulation
    UGQ 0* 20* 40* set
    Suspension
    Multi buckle web
    Posts
    1,026
    Quote Originally Posted by bncskc View Post
    Speaking from my own experience, I'm not sure it makes much difference what your quilt is rated when you are using a quilt in warmer temperatures. What I mean is a 0 or 10 or 20 deg quilt will feel about the same as a 40 deg quilt if you are using it on a 60 deg night, even a 0 deg quilt will not be uncomfortably warm. It only makes a difference when it's cold out and you need the insulation to maintain body heat.

    My experience is based on using my 0 deg quilts year round (actually a 0 deg under quilt and a 20 deg top quilt supplemented with a mummy sleeping bag when needed). Last October, when it started getting cooler, I decided to start sleeping outside every night for a while. After a couple of weeks I was really starting to enjoy being outdoors every night. After a month outdoors I wondered if I could go a whole two months straight. I have an open, but covered deck, so rain was no problem, though there were a few nights when I had to put up a tarp due to wind blown rain. After two months I wondered how cold it could get before I bugged out and went back to sleeping inside. The coldest it got here in Nashville last winter was 12 deg, and I stayed snug as a bug that night. And that coldest night was at the end of January. So, at 4 months in I thought why not try going six months. (You might say I was becoming obsessed!)

    I was relatively certain I wouldn't be able to handle the hot and humid summer nights we have here in the South, so I figured 6 months would be it. But nope, on October 15 I will have slept outside in a hammock every night for a year. And I've used a 0 deg under quilt all but about 4 or 5 nights this summer, and by the morning time I was wishing the quilt was under me a couple of those nights.

    I'm sure my body has just become acclimated to being outside every night so the temperature and humidity don't bother me so much. But the point I am trying to make is, unless pack weight is an issue, you probably only need one quilt for any temperature. Make it a quilt rated for the coldest (and then subtract 10 deg) you plan to go.
    Congrats....When I'm home every night has been outdoors for the last several yrs...lost track haha. But every night is still a hammock night regardless.
    The problem I have with top quilts is I will overheat if using a ie 0* in 30* weather... venting does not work cause I end up with cold spots.
    Underquilts no issue
    I use my quilts down to 10*plus of there rating then switch to the next warmest quilt or combination as the temps really drop out. This keeps me in the perfect world of absolute comfort....never to hot never to cold.
    I think that is why the 0/20/40 sets work so so well.
    Life is too Short to not feed the addiction....Hang on and explore the World

  7. #27
    erric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Seattle
    Hammock
    MikekiM's Half Wit
    Tarp
    HG DCF
    Insulation
    UGQ/HG
    Suspension
    Kevlar + Becket
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by bncskc View Post
    Speaking from my own experience, I'm not sure it makes much difference what your quilt is rated when you are using a quilt in warmer temperatures. What I mean is a 0 or 10 or 20 deg quilt will feel about the same as a 40 deg quilt if you are using it on a 60 deg night, even a 0 deg quilt will not be uncomfortably warm. It only makes a difference when it's cold out and you need the insulation to maintain body heat.

    My experience is based on using my 0 deg quilts year round (actually a 0 deg under quilt and a 20 deg top quilt supplemented with a mummy sleeping bag when needed). Last October, when it started getting cooler, I decided to start sleeping outside every night for a while. After a couple of weeks I was really starting to enjoy being outdoors every night. After a month outdoors I wondered if I could go a whole two months straight. I have an open, but covered deck, so rain was no problem, though there were a few nights when I had to put up a tarp due to wind blown rain. After two months I wondered how cold it could get before I bugged out and went back to sleeping inside. The coldest it got here in Nashville last winter was 12 deg, and I stayed snug as a bug that night. And that coldest night was at the end of January. So, at 4 months in I thought why not try going six months. (You might say I was becoming obsessed!)

    I was relatively certain I wouldn't be able to handle the hot and humid summer nights we have here in the South, so I figured 6 months would be it. But nope, on October 15 I will have slept outside in a hammock every night for a year. And I've used a 0 deg under quilt all but about 4 or 5 nights this summer, and by the morning time I was wishing the quilt was under me a couple of those nights.

    I'm sure my body has just become acclimated to being outside every night so the temperature and humidity don't bother me so much. But the point I am trying to make is, unless pack weight is an issue, you probably only need one quilt for any temperature. Make it a quilt rated for the coldest (and then subtract 10 deg) you plan to go.
    I'm a very hot sleeper, so on the few nights above ~75F here in Seattle I retreat to the hammock on my deck. I'll keep the UQ to the side and pull it under me sometime around midnight typically. I can sleep much cooler (so more comfortably) in the hammock outdoors when it's hot than indoors in my foam bed. Very few houses have A/C here.

  8. #28
    OneClick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Wasteland that is IN
    Hammock
    Dutch Argon 10.5'
    Tarp
    Anything Warbonnet
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear
    Suspension
    WB Straps+Buckles
    Posts
    11,069
    Images
    20
    UQ/TQ
    0/0
    20/20
    30/40

    Bottom is always more critical, so that 30 Phincubator really comes in handy. Never feels like overkill, yet it gets used a TON in spring and fall when I seem to see lows around 35 all the time. I don't want to be pushing a 40 UQ, so I don't think I'll ever have the need for one. The 20 would work in that case, but the 30 saves a lot of space.

  9. #29
    aka 'Extra' MikekiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    East of Montauk, NY
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    HG DCF Stnd + WP
    Insulation
    HammockGear
    Suspension
    Kevlar + Beckett
    Posts
    3,349
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by OneClick View Post
    UQ/TQ
    0/0
    20/20
    30/40

    Bottom is always more critical, so that 30 Phincubator really comes in handy. Never feels like overkill, yet it gets used a TON in spring and fall when I seem to see lows around 35 all the time. I don't want to be pushing a 40 UQ, so I don't think I'll ever have the need for one. The 20 would work in that case, but the 30 saves a lot of space.
    I know you are out often in winter lows.. how much do you do in summer heat?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    * The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

    * I can lift all the weight I want at the gym. Walking shouldn't be a workout. ~ Just Bill


  10. #30
    OneClick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Wasteland that is IN
    Hammock
    Dutch Argon 10.5'
    Tarp
    Anything Warbonnet
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear
    Suspension
    WB Straps+Buckles
    Posts
    11,069
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by MikekiM View Post
    I know you are out often in winter lows.. how much do you do in summer heat?
    Only 4 trips this summer. One I didn't even take the TQ and used a Coolmax bag liner which was great with a 60 low.

  • + New Posts
  • Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. CDT Gemini Temperature Ratings
      By Armadillo Hanger in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: 01-24-2019, 19:49
    2. Confused or TQ+UQ temperature ratings... Please help.
      By hangingbooger20 in forum Bottom Insulation
      Replies: 47
      Last Post: 08-08-2016, 15:02
    3. UQ/TQ Temperature Ratings, and other questions
      By KBr00ks in forum Bottom Insulation
      Replies: 23
      Last Post: 01-11-2016, 11:07
    4. Help with temperature ratings
      By behappy in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 7
      Last Post: 08-29-2012, 12:33
    5. UQ Temperature Ratings
      By riverkeeper in forum Bottom Insulation
      Replies: 19
      Last Post: 07-13-2010, 07:53

    Tags for this Thread

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •