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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by arooni View Post
    I'm wondering why couldn't I just tie a bowline knot at the end of each of my pieces of webbing? That way I'll have a loop at the end of each piece of webbing. Then I have a bomb proof knot that doesn't take more than 1' of length and is easy to untie if I need it. No extra clips or weight and maximum flexibility. Thoughts?
    You can totally do that. Knots are cheap...but do add some "bulk" when wrapping up the webbing to pack it away.

    If using knots, I would put a loop in only one end...and leave the other end flat. This allows for a toggle & marlin spike hitch, or a Beckett hitch, or J-hitch to the hammock suspension.

    When sewing the loop, I fold back 6" on each end, keep the stitching pattern in 3" (for 1" webbing), and have a 3" loop. That would be hard to match with a knot. I can easily reach though the 3" loop with gloves and pull the webbing through itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    You can certainly just tie a loop. The most appropriate knot for that would be a Water Knot which is specifically intended for flat webbing.
    +1. The "water knot" (essentially an overhand loop, but on webbing) is the best choice. A bowline will work, but is a bit fiddly to dress on webbing, and is no easier to untie in webbing.

    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    If you want to sew an eye, just fold the end over once and sew either 1) a box with and X inside like a seat belt, or 2) a series of 3 or more bar-tacks. You only need about 2 overlap.
    The rule of thumb I heard (and use) is the stitching should be three times as long as the width of the webbing. So, for 1" webbing, the stitching area should be 3" long. 2" overlap is probably still overkill....so whatever you can manage will be fine.
    Last edited by Semiuseless; 10-17-2019 at 12:24.

  2. #12

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    Lightbulb

    /!\ WARNING! SCIENCE! /!\

    Sailors, arborists, climbers, and seatbelt manufacturers have tested sewing patterns to death, so we have hard data on this topic.

    Long story short:
    • Ideal job would have ~6 bar tacks over a 3" span (on 1" webbing).
    • What matters most is the raw amount of stitching you put into it.
    • 3-to-1 width to height ratio on the sewing surface area is a good number.
    • The pattern itself doesn't matter so much, but prefer bar tacks.
    • All of the above points are overkill for hammock hanging. We're just nerding out now.

    For more than you ever wanted to know about sewing webbing, see:
    https://www.sailrite.com/How-to-Sew-Webbing-Loops

    and:
    https://www.practical-sailor.com/iss...h_11663-1.html

    Many of these tests are reaching breaking strengths of thousands of pounds, so virtually any pattern or amount of stitching its plenty good enough for your hammock suspension, even if you do a really bad job. I've been hanging on straps with a 1.5" Box-X pattern for several years and it's holding up great.

    Video highlights:


  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Great links leiavoia! Thanks for sharing.

  4. #14
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    i was playing around with this setup today and found a challenge; how to sinch the tightness on the webbing after i've fed it back thru the loop of the bowline on the end of one loop of it?

    image:

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/k6k1Qas6HEn9ejUT8

  5. #15
    cmoulder's Avatar
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    As somebody mentioned earlier, just tie a loop with a simple overhand knot. If you're into overkill, make it a figure 8.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  6. #16
    cmoulder's Avatar
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    And if you want something that cinches down nicely using just a plain flat piece of webbing and releases easily, look up slipped buntline hitch. Absolute simplicity.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  7. #17
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    Figure of 8 on a bight seems to be the most versatile to me.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradA72 View Post
    Figure of 8 on a bight seems to be the most versatile to me.
    Could be difficult to unite after loading, if that's a consideration, but I don't think I've ever tried that knot with webbing, so only speculating.

  9. #19
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    FWIW, the figure eight loop is purported to be the strongest/best for webbing.

  10. #20
    cmoulder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4free View Post
    Could be difficult to unite after loading, if that's a consideration, but I don't think I've ever tried that knot with webbing, so only speculating.
    My thinking there is that if it is being used in lieu of something permanent such as a stitched bar tack that untying it would not be a high priority.

    But I would imagine that something like inexpensive poly webbing (a perfectly fine material, just not the lightest) would be easier to untie than UHMWPE straps. Fig 8 with 11mm climbing rope and 6mm utility cord is used because with those materials it is easy to untie.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

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