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  1. #1

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    A little help with choosing material for a wookie

    Hey all,
    I am looking at picking up a wookie for my eldorado and wondering if I can get a little help with fabric types. I don't really know enough about them to discern the difference. Is there a discernible difference that a weekend camper close to home will notice?
    FYI-I am not going out on long hikes so weight is not really an issue.
    Am I ok to just choose the color I like and not worry about 15d vs 20d etc?

  2. #2
    Peppy's Avatar
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    If weight is no issue get the 20D. Slightly more durable.
    Hammock Tourist / Hammock Fiend / Hammock Therapist

  3. #3
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    I think the 20D nylon fabric is the nicest quilt fabric I have ever used. Sadly, it's not available in a lot of colors, and if you order non-custom, it's a gamble whether you receive 20D polyester, 20D nylon, or a mix of both. The 15D nylon is quite nice, too. Just not as soft as the 20D nylon. It's very similar to Argon 90, if you happen to know that. The 10D nylon I have seen so far looks and feels more synthetic to me. It wouldn't be my first or second choice. Also, I would not pick it for the inner layer of the Wooki, because that can be overstressed. Better use something stronger there. I don't like the 20D polyester at all, but then I generally don't like polyester. It produces more static electricity for me. That's probably why it always feels somewhat sticky.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    I think the 20D nylon fabric is the nicest quilt fabric I have ever used. Sadly, it's not available in a lot of colors, and if you order non-custom, it's a gamble whether you receive 20D polyester, 20D nylon, or a mix of both. The 15D nylon is quite nice, too. Just not as soft as the 20D nylon. It's very similar to Argon 90, if you happen to know that. The 10D nylon I have seen so far looks and feels more synthetic to me. It wouldn't be my first or second choice. Also, I would not pick it for the inner layer of the Wooki, because that can be overstressed. Better use something stronger there. I don't like the 20D polyester at all, but then I generally don't like polyester. It produces more static electricity for me. That's probably why it always feels somewhat sticky.
    Thanks for that perspective. I will most likely custom order since I am inTx and will be more suited to the 50 degree option. So the 20d nylon may well be an option!

  5. #5
    HandyRandy's Avatar
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    10D, 15D, and 20D are the most common fabric options for quilt shells. These numbers are referring to the size of the threads being used. So there are many brands of fabrics that fit into these categories, but they are typically pretty comparable in durability and weight if they fall into the same “D” category.

    10D is popular as an inner shell and 20D is popular for outer shells. That’s a fairly safe choice. Less than 20D for outer shells is not a good idea for anyone’s first top quilt or under quilt. You should know what you’re asking for before you go for a 15D or 10D outer shell. 10D is typically chosen for inner shells because it is lighter, more breathable, and softer feeling. Less durable too, but the argument is that the inner shell is more protected.

    As Hutzelbein pointed out, the Wooki’s inner shell is load bearing. Another point, with an UQ, the softer feel of a 10D inner shell would not be noticed. So it’s arguably worth the trade off in this case to get extra durability at the cost of extra weight and less breathability. The only real choice you should be contemplating is if you want a more durable inner shell for your top quilt or not. For the rest, you should stick with what’s generally recommended for a novice to this topic.

  6. #6

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    Contact Warbonnet and ask for a sample of each weight in colors you're considering. If you're like me and doing these purchases blind, having a bit of fabric in hand helps immensely with the decision. I have small samples of 10d in Fern Green, 15d in Dark Red and Ocean Blue, and 20d in Charcoal. This has gone a long way in informing my upcoming Wooki and Diamondback purchase, and I can tell you that for me there's no way I'd get anything in the 10d as it's just too thin, stretchy, and almost tissue-like in its translucency. I personally have concerns about its longevity and it seems like a poorly manicured fingernail would cause a run in it. I really like the 15 and 20d though and would have no problem with either one as an inner material, but I do think the 20d is better suited than the 15 for an outer.

    These are very expensive products with relatively long lead times, it can only help to be as informed as possible before taking the plunge.

  7. #7
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    I have four wookie underquilts and they are all 20d, three are ripstop nylon and one is polyester. If I close my eyes and feel the poly and the nylon, I wouldn't know the difference. Looking at them closely, you can see the square grid in the 20d nylon ripstop. If I had to choose any fabric WB offers, it would be the 20d ripstop nylon for an UQ. I do wish they had more color options in 20d nylon (I'm waiting for black). However, being an ultralight backpacker/gram weenie, after viewing this thread I might mix the fabric on the next quilt I order. I agree with Hutzelbein about using 20d as the inner, but, quit possibly may use 15d for the outer. 10D! save that for the topquilts.

  8. #8

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    Thanks y’all, this has been super helpful.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    Also, I would not pick it for the inner layer of the Wooki, because that can be overstressed. Better use something stronger there.
    Quote Originally Posted by HandyRandy View Post
    As Hutzelbein pointed out, the Wooki’s inner shell is load bearing.
    Doesn’t the rubber band stop the wooki from being over stressed? Will the 10D be damaged (overstressed) before the rubber band stretches?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbenny View Post
    Doesn’t the rubber band stop the wooki from being over stressed? Will the 10D be damaged (overstressed) before the rubber band stretches?
    It should, but it doesn't always work. I know at least one case, where a Wooki (made from 20D polyester) ripped when the user accidentally sat in it. The rubber band did not snap off completely, and the fabric ripped before the rubber band did. Obviously you shouldn't sit in your Wooki, but accidents happen. I have accidentally sat in mine several times, before I got the underquilt protector with double zipper track which prevents this kind of accident. Fortunately the rubber band or shock cord loop always broke as intended.

    Obviously the 10D nylon holds up well enough, otherwise Warbonnet would not offer it. However, 15D or 20D offers a bit of insurance for very little added weight. And after an accident with a thorn bush and two ripped 10D Incubators I stay away from 10D fabrics for underquilts.

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