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  1. #1
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    Poles vs tie outs for wind, snow, or rain

    Does anyone have experience or a link to a resource covering the advantages/disadvantages of some of the different types of winter tarp configurations such as internal end poles, external poles, center poles, or tie outs (UGQ and Dutchware both have examples). I would think that there are advantages to each type of system depending on the condition; heavy snow, driving rain, severe wind. Thanks
    Last edited by navbutler; 11-20-2019 at 14:18.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by navbutler View Post
    Does anyone have experience or a link to a resource covering the advantages/disadvantages of some of the different types of winter tarp configurations such as internal end poles, external poles, center poles, or tie outs (UGQ and Dutchware both have examples). I would think that there are advantages to each type of system depending on the condition; heavy snow, driving rain, severe wind. Thanks
    Shug has a video on that (and just about everything else hammock related) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGJxi5j6rGU

    I like Shug's videos, I learned a lot from them.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    cmc4free's Avatar
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    I have examples of all these options on various tarps.

    External poles are the lightest option.
    - If aluminum poles are used, they're significantly shorter and often smaller diameter than internal poles.
    - Trekking poles can be used instead of aluminum poles. Multitasking!
    - Maybe under ideal conditions, no poles are needed. Perhaps the panel pulls can be tied to surrounding trees, or fallen branches can be propped up to lift the panel pulls.
    - They're a good option for bridge hammocks with spreader bars at the ends.

    Internal center pole is the next lightest option.
    - Simpler to set up than external poles.
    - One downside is that the pole creates a "triangle" of lift at the center of both sides of the tarp, which can allow more wind through than external or end poles.

    Internal end poles are the heaviest, bulkiest, and most expensive option (aside from using end + center poles together).
    - They are a good option for bridge hammocks with spreader bars at the ends.
    - They open the tarp more than either of the other options.
    - Awesome feature in the "floating porch mode" that can be achieved just by loosening the guylines on one side. No trekking poles needed to support the raised side.
    - In some cases, these might create a sort of flat spot at the top of the tarp between the poles, which could collect snow that won't run off on its own.

    Photo shows the "triangle" of lift with internal center pole:


    Photo shows external poles bearing snow load:

  4. #4

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    I have the external pole mods on my my WB Superfly and Mountainfly and internal pole mods on my SLD Winter Haven and Wind Haven and I can say that I definitely prefer how much more open the internal pole mods make the tarp and the floating porch mode like cmc said. They are heavier, though, because they have to be the width of the tarp and you can't use trekking poles like you can with the external mods. It comes down to how much weight and money you want to spend to open up the tarp. I always take one of the internal mod tarps with a bridge hammock, but take one of the external mod tarps when I am trying to be more lightweight. Even when cutting weight, I still usually take the pole mod (which adds about 8 ounces for the two poles) because I like the extra room.

  5. #5
    aka 'Extra' MikekiM's Avatar
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    There is another post (you'll have to dig around) depicting a second under-tarp ridge line with a network of cordage crossing the sides of the tarp and going to the ground as a means of supporting snow. Sorry I don't have a link.
    * The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

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  6. #6
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikekiM View Post
    There is another post (you'll have to dig around) depicting a second under-tarp ridge line with a network of cordage crossing the sides of the tarp and going to the ground as a means of supporting snow. Sorry I don't have a link.
    This one? 11195782596_dff8a7bd87_z.jpg

    11213245816_2c62a4ee69_z.jpg

  7. #7
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
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    I did a lot of backyard testing a few years back. If you get a lot of snow overnight and don't want to keep knocking snow off all night long I'd stay away from anything that allows snow to build up on your tarp.



  8. #8
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    Thanks, the internal crossing line configuration looks like its worth looking for. I've never seen a system so simple like this, without modifications, that looks so effective.

  9. #9
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
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    One inner pole seems to work best for me here in Minnesota snow.
    Proper set-up in snow conditions is important too so the snow won't sink the tarp. Second video shows my tarp buried using pull-outs in a big snow we had.
    Shug



    Whooooo Buddy)))) All Secure in Sector Seven

  10. #10
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    Thanks Shug! for the 30ish windy wet weather we get in NE Ohio and Western PA, does the single pole have limitations in the wind, or is there very little difference?

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