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  1. #1
    New Member jrme1972's Avatar
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    Hennessy Hammock hangers

    Ok so I have hung in different hammocks and used the 30 deg rule, but now I have a HH expedition, I have viewed the Hennessy website and the others who rig up Hennessys and structural rideline hammocks they seem to hang them tight and be at a 30 deg angle when your full weight is in it, so Im a bit confused, I know the concept of a structural ridgeline (keeping the sag correct at all times) but little confused about how tight to rig my HH https://hennessyhammock.com/pages/set-up-instructions
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Sunny Bear's Avatar
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    I know how much everyone loves trigonometry!

    We need to establish that their are two different angles at work to think about.

    1. The "suspension angle": the angle measured from your anchor to the suspension. This measurement is taken from the ground up. The fulcrum of the angle is the attachment point of the anchor at the suspension.

    2. The "hang angle": is the amount of room in your hammock based on the level of taughtness in the hammock material itself. Pulled really tight, not a lot of room. Super loose, too much room.

    Hopefully diagram 1 will help if you have any questions about "suspension angle" and why it's important to always pay attention when setting up your suspension.

    A ridgeline is used to help keep your "hang angle". This angle is the one that effects how taught the hammock is and the amount of room inside the hammock when laying inside it. Diagram 2. Without a ridgeline your "hang angle" is directly effected by your "suspension angle" every hang everytime.

    Once you have found your perfect hang angle you will want to install a ridgeline that will maintain that hang angle regardless of suspension angle.
    This distance is generally about 83% of your hammocks finished length.

    Once the ridgeline is installed your "hang angle" is now established and will remain regardless of "suspension angle".

    Now when you set up with a not so favorable suspension angle you will still have your ideal hang angle to sleep in.

    With a Hennessy the hang angle is already established. You can pull your ridgeline tight or hang it at 30 degrees and you will have the same hang.
    The anchors will see many times greater forces applied to them if you hang tight but your comfort should remain the same.

    I'm sure I'm off on some of this but it'll get corrected lol.




    Sent from my SM-G930VL using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Sunny Bear; 11-25-2019 at 23:36.

  3. #3
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    My HH has a ridgeline. That means I can ignore hang angles pretty much and just check the ridgeline. I start out with a hang angle of roughly 30, get into the hammock and if the ridgeline is slack, I'll tighten the suspension. If the ridgeline is too tight, I'll loosen the suspension. The main thing you have to figure out is: when does your hammock feel most comfortable? When you found that setting, reach up and try to bend the ridgeline. Remember that tension for the next hang. It's fairly easy to replicate.

  4. #4
    oldpappy's Avatar
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    If the ridgeline is tight when you hang it unloaded you will probably experience calf ridge (a tight fabric ridge down the middle).
    Try hanging it with a little slack to the ridgeline so when you get in the ridgeline should be snug, but not bango tight.
    That's the way my bottom entry 'classic' HH works best.
    Enjoying the simple things in life -
    Own less, live more.

  5. #5
    New Member jrme1972's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply's and insight, looks like I was on the right track with checking ridge line tautness, but needed the advice of more experienced hangers...thanks again.

  6. #6
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldpappy View Post
    If the ridgeline is tight when you hang it unloaded you will probably experience calf ridge (a tight fabric ridge down the middle).
    Try hanging it with a little slack to the ridgeline so when you get in the ridgeline should be snug, but not bango tight.
    That's the way my bottom entry 'classic' HH works best.
    Quote Originally Posted by jrme1972 View Post
    Thanks for the reply's and insight, looks like I was on the right track with checking ridge line tautness, but needed the advice of more experienced hangers...thanks again.
    Like Pappy said, I find that most of my hammocks(including HH) with RLs tighten up a bit when I get in. So if I start out tight, they are guitar string tight once I am in. So I tend to hang them so that they are mostly straightened out, but with just a hint of sag in them. Then once I am in, I can flex the RL with my fingers pretty easy, and no guitar string.

    But here is something it took me a while to figure out. Mind you, this is just my opinion, but I'm still going by it and it is working over 12 years later: the tighter I pull my hammock suspension, the more it is going to sag when I get in, more or less. The closer the suspension rope is to being parallel to the tree, the less it is going to sag once weighted.

    I finally figured this out because the only trees I had in my back yard, for testing, were 21 feet apart and not really big enough for me to get the tree straps high enough. So I would try to make up for that by pulling my suspension rope tighter, giving me a really tight RL. Back then, that was common advice around here for the HH anyway, a lot of people liked a really tight RL. And, after all, the HH instructions right on the sack were to pull the RL snug. So some of us pulled it really snug.

    But this never helped me in my attempts to stay high enough off the ground. Using a device for tightening that was popular here for a while, I think I actually stretched the RL a bit, and the hammock was uncomfortable. Then one day I figured out that if I was able to get the tree straps high enough into the trees, shooting for the(these days) oft advised 30 degrees at the very tightest, then there was very little additional drop towards the ground once I got in. And the higher and the looser, the better. When I say looser, I don't mean the RL had to be sagging, I just mean that as the suspension rope heads for the tree, the more curve in that rope as it goes high up into the tree branches, as opposed to going straight towards the tree and being parallel to the ground, the better. Suspension rope or strap parallel to the ground, bad. More parallel to the tree, good. At least when it comes to NOT sagging down to the ground once I get in.

    Think about it like this: Take a good, strong suspension rope or webbing and stretch it between two trees, just tight enough to be straight, but not real tight. Now try to hang on it like doing a pull up. You probably can't do it unless it is real high up, because it is going to sag a whole bunch in the middle, and the further the trees are apart, the more it is going to sag. If the rope is at chair height on the trees, and you try to sit on the rope, you might end up on the ground unless the trees are pretty close.

    Now tighten that rope up a good bit and sit on or hang from it again. What is going to happen? That rope is still going to flex a whole bunch in the middle, and you might still end up close to the ground. Again, especially if those trees are far apart. So tight or hardly tight at all, the middle of that rope is going to flex way down towards the ground once you apply 200 lbs to the middle. Plus, if you pull the rope tight enough, at some point it is probably going to break when you add the weight.

    Now do the opposite. Hang a chair from that same rope, at normal chair height, from a limb straight over head. Sit in the chair. How much is the rope or webbing going to stretch and lower you towards the ground? Probably close to zero, or some very small percentage based on the stretch rating of the rope or webbing. You will not need to have the chair at all above normal chair height so that you don't end up on the ground. But with that same rope stretched straight between the trees, you are going down, probably a lot. Maybe on the ground.

    So, for that reason and a few others, it is just much better and easier(in my experience) to shoot for tree strap higher up in the tree, which will automatically require the rope to be at least a bit closer to parallel to the tree, which seems to result in way less stretch or sag.. Once you have done so, there will be no need to tighten your RL any more than just barely straight or even with just a bit of slack in it. Once it is about straight, it will be very close to the length/tightness it was designed for, and that is all you need. Any tighter is just putting useless stress on the suspension and trees. If it is just barely straight or close to it, and if it ends up straight but you can still flex it with your fingers easily once you get in, and the suspension ropes are heading up towards the top of the tree and NOT going straight out towards the tree before you get in, you are probably good to go.

    OTOH, if the RL is actually sagging after you get in, allowing the net to be too close to your face, you should probably tighten up a bit. Just enough to correct that RL sag and loose net once occupied.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 11-27-2019 at 10:18.

  7. #7
    New Member jrme1972's Avatar
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    even more great advice thank you... found this a while back ..... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSUn6zPuyFU

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