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  1. #1
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    0 degree bag not warm enough

    I bought a 0 degree loco libre top quilt last spring or so. I can only seem to get it down to 45 degrees and then I really have to start layering my clothes. I have accepted that I am a cold sleeper, but I'm beginning to wonder if the bag is really 0 degrees. I went camping at Red River Gorge last weekend and it got down to about 32 degrees. I had my top quilt, 2 blankets, a sweatshirt, a long sleeve shirt, a t-shirt, 2 long johns, flannel pants and a pair of lined sweat pants and was comfortable. Now, my top layer of clothes-shirt and sweeat shirt are all cotton. My bottom half I had a good quality base layer but then cotton clothing on top of that. So I wonder if wearing cotton affected the base layer? I am relatively new to this, it took me a year to gather info about sleep systems and purchas one. Now I am onto my clothing this winter, buying base and middle layers. But I am questioning how many base and middle layers to buy b/c in a zero degree bag I can't even get warm in 32 degrees. I don't want to think the quilt is defective b/c I truly LOVE it. I am actually saving for a 40 below bag b/c I want to winter camp, but the only company who sells that warm of a bag is loco libre and if the zero didn't work, will i be wasting money on a 40 below? or do I just need to get better clothes? I need any insight on what I can do here. This is an expensive hobby and I don't want to waste money on a 750 dollar quilt if it won't work or if i could simply save money by investing in more clothes....HELP!!!
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  2. #2
    Countrybois's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATGIRL2028 View Post
    I bought a 0 degree loco libre top quilt last spring or so. I can only seem to get it down to 45 degrees and then I really have to start layering my clothes. I have accepted that I am a cold sleeper, but I'm beginning to wonder if the bag is really 0 degrees. I went camping at Red River Gorge last weekend and it got down to about 32 degrees. I had my top quilt, 2 blankets, a sweatshirt, a long sleeve shirt, a t-shirt, 2 long johns, flannel pants and a pair of lined sweat pants and was comfortable. Now, my top layer of clothes-shirt and sweeat shirt are all cotton. My bottom half I had a good quality base layer but then cotton clothing on top of that. So I wonder if wearing cotton affected the base layer? I am relatively new to this, it took me a year to gather info about sleep systems and purchas one. Now I am onto my clothing this winter, buying base and middle layers. But I am questioning how many base and middle layers to buy b/c in a zero degree bag I can't even get warm in 32 degrees. I don't want to think the quilt is defective b/c I truly LOVE it. I am actually saving for a 40 below bag b/c I want to winter camp, but the only company who sells that warm of a bag is loco libre and if the zero didn't work, will i be wasting money on a 40 below? or do I just need to get better clothes? I need any insight on what I can do here. This is an expensive hobby and I don't want to waste money on a 750 dollar quilt if it won't work or if i could simply save money by investing in more clothes....HELP!!!
    What did you have UNDER you?

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  3. #3
    OneClick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrybois View Post
    What did you have UNDER you?
    Hopefully a 0 underquilt to match.

    Otherwise, that is a TON of clothing. Layering up may be the first thought to stay warm, but I think it makes things worse. Try a midweight base layer instead - bottoms and long sleeve top. Dedicated sleep clothes that are DRY, CLEAN AND UNWORN that day. Thick loose socks and a cozy cap for your head. Start there. Give it about 5 minutes lying there after getting in to "warm up". Make sure you're full and well hydrated all day. A warm drink before bed never hurts. Get into the hammock somewhat warm (i.e. if you're sitting around at night and think "I'm cold it's time to get into bed and warm up" it's not a good idea.)

    When the quilt is fluffed up and lying on the floor, how high is it? I can't remember the norm without looking at mine.

  4. #4
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
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    Sounds like you are over-insulated.
    Maybe sweating and getting chilled?
    Have you migrated the down in the TQ? Shaking and fluffing it.
    Are you warm when you crawl in? Make sure you are.
    A 0 bag should keep you warm at the temps you are in.
    Shug

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  5. #5
    Senior Member rweb82's Avatar
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    I've used my 20 Loco Libre TQ at -13F, and was still warm. If yours is a 0 quilt, you should have no issues staying warm at or near 0. Loco Libre is very generous with the amount of down they use, and all of my quilts from them have actually exceeded the stated comfort rating. As mentioned earlier, layering too much can have an opposite effect. Try going to bed with fewer layers and see what happens. And make sure your UQ is dialed-in properly. Where are you feeling the cold? From on top, or underneath you?

  6. #6
    Member Rusty Shackelford's Avatar
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    What type of bottom insulation are you using? Also as Shug said, too much insulation is just as bad as too little because it promotes sweating which will chill you no matter how warm you're dressed. Cotton is also generally the enemy when trying to stay warm in the cold during any kind of physical activity as it holds in moisture, look for a synthetic or wool for better results.

  7. #7
    cmc4free's Avatar
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    I agree with what others have said. A LLG quilt is going to perform to its rating for most people. That sounds like WAY too much clothing, and that can have (and probably is having) the opposite effect compared to what you'd think. I can't imagine how you'd fit that much clothing AND two blankets inside a topquilt. If the blankets are on top of the quilt, they might be compressing the loft, which you don't want.

    What dimensions are the topquilt, compared to your size? You don't want a quilt to be excessively loose and roomy or it won't insulate as effectively.

    Part of your question was wondering if cotton is to blame - and no, it should not be unless the cotton is wet for some reason.

    And lastly, for sure I would suggest not going through with buying another topquilt that's that expensive until you find your groove with what you have.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cruiser51's Avatar
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    Like a few others, I was drawn to no mention of what underquilt was used.

    Typically, the underquilt does most of the heavy lifting to keeping you warm ... as the temp drops that is the first thing I look at swapping out.

    So ... inquiring minds want to know about the under quilt ot bottom insulation you use?

    Brian

  9. #9
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATGIRL2028 View Post
    I bought a 0 degree loco libre top quilt last spring or so. I can only seem to get it down to 45 degrees and then I really have to start layering my clothes. I have accepted that I am a cold sleeper, but I'm beginning to wonder if the bag is really 0 degrees. I went camping at Red River Gorge last weekend and it got down to about 32 degrees. I had my top quilt, 2 blankets, a sweatshirt, a long sleeve shirt, a t-shirt, 2 long johns, flannel pants and a pair of lined sweat pants and was comfortable. Now, my top layer of clothes-shirt and sweeat shirt are all cotton. My bottom half I had a good quality base layer but then cotton clothing on top of that. So I wonder if wearing cotton affected the base layer? I am relatively new to this, it took me a year to gather info about sleep systems and purchas one. Now I am onto my clothing this winter, buying base and middle layers. But I am questioning how many base and middle layers to buy b/c in a zero degree bag I can't even get warm in 32 degrees. I don't want to think the quilt is defective b/c I truly LOVE it. I am actually saving for a 40 below bag b/c I want to winter camp, but the only company who sells that warm of a bag is loco libre and if the zero didn't work, will i be wasting money on a 40 below? or do I just need to get better clothes? I need any insight on what I can do here. This is an expensive hobby and I don't want to waste money on a 750 dollar quilt if it won't work or if i could simply save money by investing in more clothes....HELP!!!
    As others have said, first things first: what are you using to insulate your back, butt and legs in contact with the hammock bottom?

    Once that is known, then several other possibilities can be discussed. All of that cotton clothing, you might be over insulating to the point of sweating and getting that cotton wet. Once cotton is wet or even damp, it is game over in my experience. Or, trying to get all of that cotton inside a bag or TQ, or lating it on top, might compress the down reducing th TQ effectiveness. I would think that, even a cold sleeper should be plenty warm almost naked inside a 0F TQ, to at least 30F or lower, assuming no drafts and adequate back insulation.

    Other possibilities: have you previously been warm enough using a sleeping bag in your hammock, zipped up inside the bag? When I first started trying to use my bag as a TQ, because it was so difficult for me to get zipped up inside the bag while in a hammock, I had a hard time being anywhere near a warm as in the bag. This was no doubt mostly due to drafts near the neck shoulder areas, or due to drafts that would develop elsewhere when I moved in my sleep. Another problem was the loss of the mummy bag's hood. I did find a dedicated TQ much easier to avoid drafts, but there was still a learning curve for me, but I got good at it. However, if my 2.5" thick UQ was really going to compete with my 2.5" top layer thickness sleeping bag- even after I got more skilled at avoiding drafts- I had to do something about that missing hood. Adding a separate JRB down hood dealt with that problem nicely. Much better than any caps or balaclavas or jacket hoods alone had been doing. Now, I usually have no problems being warm at the rated temps of my JRB quilts, even if sleeping in just a pair of cotton PJs.

    My 1st guess is- assuming adequate back insulation- you most likely have a draft problem, and/or inadequate head insulation. Mainly because I know a draft can turn a 0 TQ into a 50 TQ. That seems more likely that too much cotton clothing. (but all that cotton is not helping!). OTOH, if your back is not adequately insulated, you are not going to be warm enough with any available TQ. So, how about that back insulation, what are you using?
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 10-22-2020 at 09:39.

  10. #10
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    PS: if you are wondering about the rating of the TQ, measure it! Lay it out flat on a bed or the floor and measure how thick it is. I forget exactly what 0F should be, but I'm thinking 3.5" to 4" single layer? But I bet that TQ is at least 3.5" thick, SINGLE LAYER. ( a 0F sleeping bag would be about double thickness, due to two layers)

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