Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
  1. #21
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    3,668
    Images
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by Pop_Eye View Post
    Would you agree that 30Degs is a good jumping off point for trial and error of figuring out how to hang your own hang?
    No doubt 30 is a good starting point, although many seem to think it's sacrosanct and demands critical precision. It doesn't.
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ) Instagram (me!)

    To equip a pedestrian with shelter, bedding, utensils, food, and other necessities, in a pack so light and small that he can carry it without overstrain, is really a fine art. ~ Horace Kephart, 1906

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Pop_Eye View Post
    Would you agree that 30Degs is a good jumping off point for trial and error of figuring out how to hang your own hang?
    No, hears why. The 30 degrees is with you lying in the hammock. Unless you have a friend to measure, starting at 30 degrees in an empty hammock is useless. Even with a friend, your gonna be chasing your tail trying to get the correct angle. Heres what I do. I look for a span that is as close to 15 feet as I can. I find this is the best for hanging a gathered end hammock. Then I set the straps, the height depends on the hammock, but a good place to start would be eye level for a stiffer hammock, like a double layer Blackbird XLC, and around a foot above my head for a stretchy one, like a 1.6 single layer Darien (Im 61). I also make sure the foot end is around six inches higher than the head. Next I look at the ridgeline. If its got a bit of sag to it (not too tight, not too loose), then Im nearly home free. Get in, check out the lay, make a few adjustments and your done. After doing this a few times, it becomes second nature. It also helps to have a brightly colored ridgeline (I use yellow 2.2mm zing-it), and make sure the ridgeline length is 109.5 (assuming you have an 11 hammock). Youd be surprised how off some of them are.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  3. #23
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    2,633
    IF YOU HAVE A STURCTURAL RIDGE LINE - then you dont have to worry about the 30 degrees as much because your ridgeline keeps the sag and absorbs force that would be imparted to the hammock fabric. Rex Cliftons calculation puts his sag at about 83% of hammock length - as much a rule of thumb as the 30 degree hang angle. So they are all a bit related - often you will see 83% of physical hammock length for the hung hammock length. Sometimes hammock calculators use 86%. The idea is it is a zone of comfort, not an absolute number. The 30 degrees comes in because it results in a minimum additional force on the hammock material.

    For example, if you weigh 200 lbs., an angle of 30 degrees will put about 200 lbs force on the hammock and suspension. But if your angle is 20 degrees, that force can jump up to 300 lbs for 200 lbs. in the hammock. So if the hammock is rated at 250 lbs, you can easy exceed that rating by ignoring the 30 degree recommendation.

    If you have a structural ridgeline on your hammock, it will keep that extra force from exerting its destructive force on the hammock but do know it will be felt by the suspension and anchor - like if its an indoor hang using a 2 x 4 behind sheet rock.

    In short - the 30-ish degree angle is the kindest angle for your hammock, suspension, anchor - even if your ridgeline keeps the 83% sag.
    Last edited by cougarmeat; 11-30-2020 at 18:13.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    SLD Voyageur / TL
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    SLD UQ, HG TQ
    Suspension
    Buckles/Becket
    Posts
    300
    Ridgeline makes it much easier to get a great setup. If I am in a hurry (rain, tired, hungry, whatever) I will just synch both ends tight-ish with the straps on the tree at about head height. By the time I get in and factoring in the stretch/settling of the straps, knots, and hammock, it usually comes in about right and is always comfortable.

  5. #25
    Member Pop_Eye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Hammock
    Wide Chameleon
    Suspension
    Straps & Buckles
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    No doubt 30 is a good starting point, although many seem to think it's sacrosanct and demands critical precision. It doesn't.

    I think this is one of the reasons I like hammocks. It's akin to photography and music. Hammock suspensions have "rules and guidelines" that can be understood, then if needed, broken and continually evolve to suit your comfort to make it your own.

    Hang failures by trial and error taught me more than my comfortable nights sleep!

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB XLC
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    Incubator + SLD TW
    Suspension
    WB webbing
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Pop_Eye View Post
    I think this is one of the reasons I like hammocks. It's akin to photography and music. Hammock suspensions have "rules and guidelines" that can be understood, then if needed, broken and continually evolve to suit your comfort to make it your own.

    Hang failures by trial and error taught me more than my comfortable nights sleep!
    So true and really true almost everything in life. This kind of thing always makes me think about the tradition guild system and the whole apprentice/master system. You teach the apprentices to just follow the rules. Sometimes (often?) blindly. And that works. But the true master emerges when he just ignores the rules and still gets good or even better results using his own method(s). Of course you'll have some masters that won't allow their apprentices these "transgressions" and just stick to "but we've always done it that way" and many (most?) apprentices never truly master their craft and just keep to the way they learned it.

  7. #27
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    2,633
    The thing about there “rules” is they aren’t random. They’ve been developed over years of trial and error. That doesn’t mean they can’t be improved upon - they came about by “breaking” a previous rule. But I think that before breaking a rule, a person should at least try it and understand how it came to be - not just ignore it because “you’re not the boss of me”. It took many, many, many lessons in my work history where, new to a job, I’d see lots of things people were doing “wrong”. But then, after a few months on the job, I’d start to see why things were done the way they were. Often there were elements, important elements, I hadn’t even considered.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  8. #28
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    3,668
    Images
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by cougarmeat View Post
    The thing about there “rules” is they aren’t random. They’ve been developed over years of trial and error. That doesn’t mean they can’t be improved upon - they came about by “breaking” a previous rule. But I think that before breaking a rule, a person should at least try it and understand how it came to be - not just ignore it because “you’re not the boss of me”. It took many, many, many lessons in my work history where, new to a job, I’d see lots of things people were doing “wrong”. But then, after a few months on the job, I’d start to see why things were done the way they were. Often there were elements, important elements, I hadn’t even considered.
    I was happy to discover that much of what I was led to believe is necessary is in fact not required at all.

    However, the journey to simplicity took a fair amount of effort.
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ) Instagram (me!)

    To equip a pedestrian with shelter, bedding, utensils, food, and other necessities, in a pack so light and small that he can carry it without overstrain, is really a fine art. ~ Horace Kephart, 1906

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    SLD Voyageur / TL
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    SLD UQ, HG TQ
    Suspension
    Buckles/Becket
    Posts
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    I was happy to discover that much of what I was led to believe is necessary is in fact not required at all.

    However, the journey to simplicity took a fair amount of effort.

    I took a friend hammock camping last summer. We both setup our hammocks, etc - he said he wanted to figure it out. After I was done and relaxed a bit I checked out his setup. He had everything up - tarp, hammock, UQ, and was lying in the hammock. I asked him how it felt and he said it was amazing. I saw lots of ‘rules’ broken but I said that’s awesome and started the fire.

    Remember the point is to have fun and enjoy yourself. If you do everything correctly but don’t do that, then what’s the point?

  10. #30
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    2,633
    Yah but you know those videos where someone used a masonry pillar as an anchor for their hammock. . who cares about physics, just a bunch of rules.

    I guess the key here is Tpatter checked out his friends setup. Im sure if he saw something off that would be dangerous, he would have said something. There is absolutely a wide road of setups and many times the most efficient isnt the goal.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  • + New Posts
  • Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. Absolutely impressed!
      By Samuel4130 in forum UGQ Outdoor Equipment
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 03-21-2015, 14:13
    2. Absolutely best Underinsulation for <=$100
      By Insaniac99 in forum Archived WTB
      Replies: 9
      Last Post: 06-09-2014, 10:37
    3. Hammock While Hunting...ABSOLUTELY!
      By rhinoman in forum Trip Reports
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 11-12-2012, 19:25
    4. Do I absolutely need both spreader bars?
      By Joz in forum Jacks-R-Better
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 06-05-2009, 23:37

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •