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  1. #1
    New Member whoopie's Avatar
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    Ridgerunner vs blackbird XLC

    Instead of a second XLC ( changing from heavyweight DL to lightweight DL ) the Ridgerunner might be a alternative. Something different to experience and since I am also in the mood to buy a 3 season UQ ..., why not

    The weight of a Lynx seems to be equal to a Wooki, the weight of the ridge runner is very acceptable compared to a XLC.
    The double layer Ridgerunner without suspension would be around the same in weight for the double layer version.

    A question because I don't have any experience with this kind of hammocks :

    Is the ridgerunner also comfortabler in a double version instead of single layer ?
    Is the system with the spreader bar stable and durable?

    I also like the double storage capacity, handy

    Please comment from experts.
    thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    I own both. Whether that makes me an expert depends on whether I get paid or not. (spoiler: I am not paid for the following comments)

    To some degree, how much you weigh plays into the choice of a single-layer vs double-layer RR. I went with a double-layer since I weigh more than 200 lbs, but less than 250. The double-layer supports my carcass better and provides more comfort in doing so.

    When assembled properly and used appropriately, the spreader bar system is safe, stable and durable. I haven't heard of any "failures from the field" in the 4 years I've been hanging.

    And, yes, the saddlebags are awesome. Bottom line: Warbonnet designs great sleeping systems for outdoor/indoor use.
    The game is the best teacher.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    I have both a double-layer Ridgerunner and a single-layer XLC. Here is how they compare in my experience. Note, I don't own a Wooki (yet! I'm ordering one today!), so I've used an Incubator on my XLC, and I do have a Lynx for my Ridgerunner.

    1) Set-up. The Ridgerunner is practically fool-proof. The one time I had issues was when I had an extremely poor tree selection at a state park site where the forest sloped down steeply from the edge of a treeless campsite, and I ended up picking two trees that were too far apart because they were my best options to be able to hang a tarp. My back was killing me in the middle of the night because of a bend in the RR (due to the poor hang), so I got up and picked two trees which were closer together (ditching my tarp), and that solved the issue. A gathered end hammock is going to be more fiddly - at least for me, I end up testing it out, making adjustments, testing again, etc., for a few repetitions. I'm sure however that there are people on here experienced enough with their gathered ends that they can nail the hang straight away. But for me, the RR is quicker and easier to use.

    2) Bulk and packing. A gathered end hammock is going to probably pack a bit larger than a RR, but with a RR, you have to pack the poles. My previous pack (a Kelty 65) barely fit the RR poles, and in fact I had to buy the new version of the poles to get them in there, because my older poles would stick out the top. My new pack (without a sleeping bag compartment), can fit the poles without any issue. Obviously the poles do add some weight, but I don't worry about weight too much for my big 3. In terms of the underquilt, my Incubator is much bulkier than my Lynx (at the same rating), as there is a much wider area that it has to cover. I don't know how the weight compares. I also don't know how a Lynx would compare to a Wooki in terms of bulk, but I'm assuming the Wooki would still be a bit bulkier.

    3) Attaching an underquilt. This probably isn't very relevant given that I haven't used a Wooki, but obviously the Lynx is much easier to use than the Incubator. Almost zero set-up effort. It's on in about 15 seconds and that's that. No cold spots, no fiddling, no elastic support digging into your head. I'm hoping for the same experience with my future Wooki.

    4) Storage pockets. I LOVE the saddle bags on the Ridgerunner, and the small head-end pocket. I can shove my sleep clothes in the saddlebags when I'm setting up, and shove my day clothes in there when I'm going to bed. That lets me change inside the hammock (good for privacy and staying warm in cold weather). You can also shove any extra insulation in there that you aren't using at the moment but might want during the night. Above my head I keep my headlamp, a small nighttime pull-out pouch, and a book/Kindle. I have heard some people say they preferr the BB shelf to the RR saddlebags, but I am not one of them. I find the shelf much more awkward to use. When I'm inside the hammock I can't look down inside of it because it's too far above my head, and it can be tricky to retrieve things from the bottom. I also don't think it can fit as much as the saddlebags can. Plus, there is no extra pocket at the head end. I've added a little organizer to my ridgeline on my XLC for easy accessibility to small things, basically replicating the head-end pocket, but I don't find it as nice to use, especially as it tends to shift around when it has heavier items inside.

    5) Ridgeline. The XLC has one, the RR doesn't (unless you manage to rig something up custom). I started out with the RR, and used that for a couple of years before I got my first serious gathered-end hammock, so that has never bothered me. If you make use of the ridgeline, this is something to consider.

    6) Comfort. A lot of people prefer the flat lay of the RR, but my back is weird and messed up, and I actually sleep more comfortably in a gathered end (the reason I switched in the first place). There is no hanging out in the RR before bed for me, because my back can tolerate only a certain numbers of hours in it without pain (same as a regular bed). I don't have the same restriction with the XLC (or any gathered end, even cheap ones). However, this is very individual, and YMMV. You are definitely more restricted in your sleep positions in the RR. I get into all sort of crazy contortions in my XLC that I couldn't do in my RR, particularly with how it narrows in the middle. Some people find they can sleep more easily on their sides in the RR, but I can sleep easily on my side in both hammocks. If you stick to sleeping on your back, the RR does eliminate calf ridge, which can definitely be an issue with the XLC. I like to have a bit of extra insulation in the XLC to stick under my knees to alleviate any problems with calf ridge or knee hyperextension.

    7) Visibility. This is a short section. The visibility from the RR is much better. You can see well on both sides. With the XLC, you can really only see out of one side.

    8) Ease of getting in and out/Stability. You can get in and out from either side of the RR, and you don't have to worry about putting strain on the zippers if you zip up partially as you are getting in (for mosquitoes). I find the XLC a little trickier, as when I've tried getting in on the shelf side, it seemed like it was putting a strain on the zippers, and when I get in on the other side, you get in with your body pointing in the wrong direction, and then have to readjust when you are inside. Maybe I'm doing it wrong? I never had any issue with my Dream Hammock (no shelf and much more robust zippers), and haven't really had the XLC that long. Plus I always worry about the XLC zippers in general, which are much smaller and more delicate than the ones on my gathered end Dream Hammock, and have a tendency to catch. I never worried about the zippers on my RR - I don't know whether they are using different zippers now, or if it's just that there is no strain on the RR zippers as you are getting in and out. I should note that the RR is very slightly tippier than the XLC, but I've never felt in danger of actually tipping over in my RR. I've even knelt in it (carefully). You just keep your weight low, same as if you were in a boat. So I haven't noticed any issues with either stability or durability with the RR.

    9) Using a pad. You probably likely know this, but a pad is super easy to use with the RR. I don't use a pad, but will slip a space blanket between my RR layers in winter. I never had any luck doing the same with my previous double-layered gathered end, which is why I went single-layer with the XLC. People do use pads with gathered-end hammocks, but the RR makes it much easier.

    Well, that was super long. I hope it was helpful. Feel free to ask further questions!
    Last edited by bansheekitty; 01-02-2021 at 12:26.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Hard to follow the previous posts which are great comparisons. I own both a double layer RR and a double layer BB XLC. I prefer the BB XLC slivhtly for comfort but both are excellent hammocks. I don’t find one more or less difficult to hang, just a little different.

  5. #5
    gunner76's Avatar
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    A gathered end hammock is going to be more fiddly - at least for me,
    While I use a BlackBird and the wife uses a RR ( she has been using her RR's for about 5 years now ), I end up setting having to set up both of them. I find the BB ( a gathered end ) much less fiddley to set up. I use Dutch Clips and straps for both and not Whoopie Slings. I found that Whoopie Slings require much more fiddling to set up and at times actually limited where I could set up a hammock due to spacing requirements of the whoopies.
    I am still 18 but with 49 years of experience !

  6. #6
    cougarmeat's Avatar
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    gunner76, because the RR likes a 13 ft distance between apex connectors, I made an Amsteel 13 ft structural ridgeline for it - it’s above the bug net. So I just have to clip one end, then pull the RR to the other connection and clip in at the best daisy chain loop. My friend likes hers less taut, so I made a 12 ft ridgeline for her. I may switch from daisy chain to webbing adjustment this summer - at least for me. But the added ridgeline above the bug net reduces the fiddley factor a bit.

    My next step is to note the height of the spreader bars when I stand next to them so I learn a sense of where they need to be to give the desired sit height and the foot/head height difference.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  7. #7
    New Member whoopie's Avatar
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    Interesting feedback , thank you so much to all.

    @ bansheekitty :
    You won't regret the wooki !
    After a few cold nights, I replaced the sleeping pad with an incubator.
    Unfortunately I was never able to hang this UQ nicely due a lot of hassle with the shock cords. And woken up to twice at night because the incubator was just hanging next to the hammock. Well, I maneuver too much during my sleep and apparently the incubator is just not right for me. I have been using the wooki for 3 years now and this UQ is perfect. The wooki insulation follows the diagonal position and this seems to me a lot more logical than the adjustment cords with the incubator. Hanging the wooki is therefore super easy.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoopie View Post
    @ bansheekitty :
    You won't regret the wooki !
    After a few cold nights, I replaced the sleeping pad with an incubator.
    Unfortunately I was never able to hang this UQ nicely due a lot of hassle with the shock cords. And woken up to twice at night because the incubator was just hanging next to the hammock. Well, I maneuver too much during my sleep and apparently the incubator is just not right for me. I have been using the wooki for 3 years now and this UQ is perfect. The wooki insulation follows the diagonal position and this seems to me a lot more logical than the adjustment cords with the incubator. Hanging the wooki is therefore super easy.

    Excellent, thanks! I purchased a 0 degree custom Wooki a few days ago. I also ponied up for the reverse lay. I've always been a left layer, but when I bought my XLC last year I had decided to try a right lay, as the previous year WB had included stock Wookis in the Black Friday sale, and I didn't want to miss out on those kind of savings in future sales. But I think that's the first time that underquilts have been on sale, and when they weren't included in the sale this year, I figured that underquilt sales weren't going to be a new trend, and if I'm not missing out on sales, $25 is worth it to go back to a left lay. I've already flipped my bug-netting, and I'm super excited for my new Wooki to come.

  9. #9
    New Member whoopie's Avatar
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    Still interested in every experience between the xlc and the ridgerunner. But thanks again for your wel detailed initial reply.
    If I cancel the purchase of a ridgerunner, I would dare to buy a second wooki. Probably 10 or 20 degrees.
    Can you also upload pictures of your winter wooki in the stuff sack?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoopie View Post
    Still interested in every experience between the xlc and the ridgerunner. But thanks again for your wel detailed initial reply.
    If I cancel the purchase of a ridgerunner, I would dare to buy a second wooki. Probably 10 or 20 degrees.
    Can you also upload pictures of your winter wooki in the stuff sack?
    Sure, although it's probably going to be a while before it arrives.

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