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  1. #11
    cougarmeat's Avatar
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    Another consideration is your hammock connection point. Just because the vertical beams are “solid at the top” that doesn’t mean your best connection point - from the hammocks point of view, would be at that top. Use the hammock hang calculator to determine your connection point height given the distance of your trees (the pillars) and the hammock ridgeline (for the height you like to hang).

    http://theultimatehang.com/hammock-hang-calculator/
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  2. #12
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    The major forces on the structure will be pulling the corners out of square unless there is a beam between them to take the compression. That doesn’t mean it will collapse on you. It looks like the roof has enough cross members to handle that.

    I would consider looping chain or amsteel up through the roof gap, and around the post if possible. That avoids putting holes in things and redirects load a little bit.

  3. #13
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    i would agree with silvrsurfr here, that structure was definitely not designed for such loads, and we shouldn't expect it to be overbuilt/overdesigned to "cope with anything". i'd be very suspicious and assume it will eventually collapse in some interesting way, unless i am or have access to a structural engineer who can make a proper stress analysis. and the lack of proper footing is indeed additionally concerning in this case, as it will change how the legs are loaded (to simplify, it will put load on the joint on top, at the roof, trying to "fold it in", which is one thing the engineers of the structure were most likely not concerned with at all, so who knows how it would behave)

    the problem i see is not endangering the investment in said backyard furniture (or whatever it is called), but the potential of injury in case it fails, especially that it might fail at some unexpected time, it might not be you using it then, but kids or whatever.

    i agree with the advise to build a simple backyard tensa (great to have around anyway, and folds so nicely that you can easily stow it in some corner, unlike most other stands), or maybe you can consider "hiding" a stand in the structure of the gazebo (the hollow pilars can house some serious metal pipe, and under the roof, from pillar to pillar, you can have a similar pipe for the "top rail", effectively building a sort of turtle stand inside the structure; you still might want to clear the design and build with an engineer friend though if you're not confortable with such things)

    if you do decide to try it anyway, i suggest to first tie a rope with suitable slack between the two pillars you intend to use, and attach a load to it. load the rope while nobody is under or near the structure, with at least 2x your body weight, and see what happens (you can load it remotely in various ways, perhaps resting the load on a chair you can pull from underneath it from a distance, using another rope, or a number of other ways). do record it if you test, at least if it collapses, you'll have a video to show for it. but most importantly stay safe and out of the way, and remember that, even if it doesn't collapse at first test, it doesn't make it safe for use.

  4. #14
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    One method of reducing a LOT of stress is to use a solid ridge pole and attach the hammock to the ridge pole. The ridgepole is suspended from the structure, in this case the gazebo. The stress on the structure is then reduced to approximately half the hangers weight instead of the stronger angular forces pulling on the structure at the attachment points for a conventional hanging method. I use this type of system in my house. I have aluminum 4 foot camouflage netting poles that are suspended from the red iron trusses on pulleys so that I can alter the height of the hang depending on what hammock I'm using. I can also add or subtract poles depending on the hammock, e.g. 2 poles for a Hammocktent 90; 3 poles for a DH Sparrow or WBBB XLC; and 4 poles for a 12' SLD Trail Lair.

    I was actually thinking about suggesting this in the thread about campground hanging sites because this method, i.e. a solid top bar or ridgeline, is a lot safer, think less liability for the agencies, and would probably last longer due to the reduced stress on the hanging posts.

  5. #15
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlTrailDog View Post
    One method of reducing a LOT of stress is to use a solid ridge pole and attach the hammock to the ridge pole. The ridgepole is suspended from the structure, in this case the gazebo. The stress on the structure is then reduced to approximately half the hangers weight instead of the stronger angular forces pulling on the structure at the attachment points for a conventional hanging method. I use this type of system in my house. I have aluminum 4 foot camouflage netting poles that are suspended from the red iron trusses on pulleys so that I can alter the height of the hang depending on what hammock I'm using. I can also add or subtract poles depending on the hammock, e.g. 2 poles for a Hammocktent 90; 3 poles for a DH Sparrow or WBBB XLC; and 4 poles for a 12' SLD Trail Lair.

    I was actually thinking about suggesting this in the thread about campground hanging sites because this method, i.e. a solid top bar or ridgeline, is a lot safer, think less liability for the agencies, and would probably last longer due to the reduced stress on the hanging posts.
    An added top bar will definitely vastly improve the safety. I hung for several years from a single 2X4 upright on each end,with no problems at all, very solid. But, I had a top bar running between those uprights. Without that I'm sure my 2x4s would have snapped. I would either run my suspension around both the bar and the 2X4, or if I needed a lower hang around the 2X4 only, with some bolts thru the 2X4, which were enough to prevent my suspension straps from sliding down the uprights. I could not tell that those 2X4s ever flexed. If they did so, it was very minimal.

    So, I figure an added top rail ( fence post, EMT or wood) will keep you safe. ( I used 2 fence top rails with one cut off and the two joined together for 15 ft, with a section of wider diameter fence upright around the joint to beef it up) Or, build a stand such as the Tensa style.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 01-26-2021 at 13:48.

  6. #16
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    I would second and third what people are saying. The instruction manual (although most manual will say that 'just in case' anyway) say that this was not designed to take any sort of load.

    "Product is NOT INTENDED for the following: As load bearing support for a ... heavy objects or swings"

    It even says you should clear snow off the roof.

    You can see all over the place where people ask whether they can hang a hammock from 4x4 posts and are told NOT to do it. These are not 4x4 posts. They're not even posts at all. They're hollow like you said. Basically it's a top (and I guess bottom too?) of wood blocks (solid or pressed wood fibre?) with basically 2x6 cladding holding up a roof somehow if I read you correctly. Don't be fooled by the "7x7" look of the outside.

    As people have said, the tapcons don't do much. Sure the tapcons might be rated for 'enough load' (I've used them for a wall in the basement). But a basement floor is usually about 4" of solid concrete w/ rebar and it's one huge slab that's not gonna go anywhere. Since we don't have a picture of the 'patio stones' you put this on, I'd assume something like maybe made up of individual 24x24x2 patio slabs on a sand/gravel base. I'd be worried about that holding up just the gazebo itself, if you didn't do concrete footings for it.

    Now that said, you can hang from fence posts, as you can see from Shug's videos. Those are probably 6x6 posts anchored in at least 4ft concrete footing though (I don't really know, but since he's in Minnesota I'd assume his frost line is either the same or even lower than here in Montreal and we have it at 4ft.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by HomerJ View Post
    Stock pics as in "from the manufacturer's website", but they are from my gazebo model, which looks identical.

    Not sure what is frightening about tapcons in patio stones as the goal is to prevent the base of the posts from moving laterally. If I were in tornado alley this would be a different story.

    Anyway, I can take pics tomorrow, but I figured they'd be the same as the manufacturer's, except worst quality since I'm such a bad photographer.
    Hi, I faced with the similar issue with my cedar gazebo. Spent about $6000 totally and I'm afraid too. What is your decision finally and where are the photos? Hope you did it!
    Thanks in advance

  8. #18
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    Haven't hung from it. Built a tensa stand and using that instead.

  9. #19
    Senior Member old4hats's Avatar
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    If I had that structure I would long since have been hanging there. Looks plenty strong to me.
    If you prepare for failure you will probably succeed.

  10. #20

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    Lovely area.

    I would be tempted to add 2 posts to the right of the Gazebo to the right of the Downspout and hang there.

    Otherwise, this nice area will almost always have a hammock in it.

    I have a permanent-ish spot out by the patio for my hammock. I love it. Use it probably 3-4 times per day for a cup of coffee, just a short sit, or a full on nap. Itís my favorite part of the house!

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