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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ylnfrt View Post
    Also look around for already fallen branchs in the site area- branchs don't fall from live trees.
    Unfortunately they do! I have many live trees in my garden and around on the neighbor's lots. Branches still fall, even large ones. It's caused by competition. The lower branches die off and eventually fall if the conditions are right. We had two large limbs fall from our trees in a recent wet snow event. From trees on opposite places on our lot. And I see some more up there ready to fall at some point.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    And birch trees? I'm not going near a birch tree.
    Absolutely seconded. They're the first to lean onto the streets here in ice rain or wet snow and walking through the wooded areas, the species that I see most if one just snapped. And right about/above the height one might have attached a hammock.

  2. #12
    cougarmeat's Avatar
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    I’d be careful around Aspens too. Around here, the roots are very shallow. The one in a backyard I used to have would only get so tall, then the wind load they’d take would be stronger than their root hold and over they’d go. Of course new stringers would be sprouting up within week or so. Maybe the taller ones, in the wild, are stronger. But in the PNW, pine, fir, cedar are not hard to come by. What ever the case, be sure to look up at the branches first.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ylnfrt View Post
    When your looking up check for any signs of mistletoe - a bushy looking waxy leafy fungus that grows on dead/ dying hardwood. We have a lot of it in the area right now. Some of these trees are 4'+ in diameter and 60'+ high- no telling which way they will fall. Also look around for already fallen branchs in the site area- branchs don't fall from live trees.
    I have 4 maple trees, an apple tree, a white pine and a blue spruce in my yard. Every week before I mow, I have to pick up all the shed branches from beneath the maples and apple tree. They're not very big (they rarely exceed the thickness of my thumb), but they shed CONSTANTLY throughout the summer.

  4. #14
    Senior Member ibgary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cougarmeat View Post
    I’d be careful around Aspens too. Around here, the roots are very shallow. The one in a backyard I used to have would only get so tall, then the wind load they’d take would be stronger than their root hold and over they’d go. Of course new stringers would be sprouting up within week or so. Maybe the taller ones, in the wild, are stronger. But in the PNW, pine, fir, cedar are not hard to come by. What ever the case, be sure to look up at the branches first.
    Aspins seem to have very shallow roots. I tied off to one about 5" in diameter. Sit test in the hammock pulled it over.
    Trees can drop branches or fall on tents too. Just try to make it a habit to look the trees over before setting up camp. Ive seen plenty of demolished picnic tables.

    Sent from my couch

  5. #15
    alt.thomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantom Grappler View Post
    Many experienced hammock campers hang from smallest diameter and height trees, that are strong enough to be safe. Less chance of dead and rotting limbs on young trees. And if a limb does fall, since it’s from a smaller tree, that limb might be smaller too.
    Very solid advice. Also the taller the tree, the more it will sway in the winds.

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